Airport operators pivot to cargo services to survive pandemic

first_imgThe company also reduced its operational costs at storage facilities across the AP II airports by 40 percent compared to normal operations, Riyanto added.In addition, AP II provided warehouse facilities for airlines via its subsidiaries PT Angkasa Pura Kargo and PT Gapura Angkasa. For example, Gapura Angkasa, which owns a warehouse more than 8,900 square meters in size at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Tangerang, Banten, provides access to facilities like cold storage and animal storage.Tapping into these aspects of the cargo business line, as opposed to relying on air passenger traffic, has allowed the airport operator to begin softening the impact COVID-19 has had on the industry.According to Statistics Indonesia (BPS), domestic air passengers fell 85.18 percent yoy in April to around 840,000 people, while international air passengers fell 98.26 percent yoy.The drop in passenger traffic has hit airport revenues hard, as data from the 2019 Airports Economics Report, released by Airports Council International (ACI), shows that 54.6 percent of total airport income in the Asia-Pacific comes from passenger-related revenues.AP I cited revenue diversification through the establishment of an airport ecosystem that includes a cargo village as part of its survival strategy during the pandemic. It aims to create a new business stream that depends little on aircraft and passenger traffic, it stated.“Angkasa Pura I has prepared a rebound strategy to anticipate the new normal and to prepare for a jump in the company’s growth in 2021 through a multidimensional performance improvement program,” AP I president director Faik Fahmi said on Saturday in a press release, adding that the current situation was “challenging for airport operators”.AP I logistics subsidiary Angkasa Pura Logistics (APL) launched its own air freight service on June 4.It aims to provide logistics services that can reach areas that are difficult for commercial planes to access due to short runways. For its operation, APL would focus on the delivery of marine and perishable goods, which require quick shipping times to ensure freshness.Transportation expert Djoko Setijowarno told the Post that the companies made the right decision by focusing their business on the cargo sector.“It’s a step that must be taken during the pandemic as passenger numbers are slumping. Logistics could serve as a source of income for the airports and there is also huge potential for domestic cargo in Indonesia,” Djoko said in a phone interview on Monday.Topics : State-owned airport operators Angkasa Pura I and II are turning to cargo and warehousing services to shift their revenue source as the government’s social restrictions continue to affect air passenger numbers.Operating in an archipelagic nation, where air transportation is essential to connect far-flung islands, Angkasa Pura (AP) II sees potential for growth in the air cargo industry in Indonesia, despite having recorded a decline in cargo volume at its airports during the pandemic.Air freight volume at its 19 airports fell 34 percent year-on-year (yoy) to 79,556 tons between April 1 and June 7, data from AP II cargo subsidiary Angkasa Pura Kargo (APK) show. However, the operator managed to record 34,000 tons of cargo traffic between May 7 and June 7 alone. “The cargo volume is not as high as in normal conditions. But the shipment volume, which still stands at 34,000 tons, shows that business prospects in air shipment remain stable and have the potential to grow this year,” AP II president director Muhammad Awaluddin said in a press statement on Sunday.Awaluddin also noted the absence of restrictions for air cargo amid the pandemic, as well as the decision by commercial airlines to modify their fleets with freighters to support the airport cargo business.To further capitalize its air cargo business, AP II through APK established a partnership with cargo agents while also employing cost-efficiency measures at its storage facilities.“We are consolidating cargo loads from several sub-agents and bundling them together so they can be shipped using a chartered carrier. We already established charter cargo flights twice a week in June, and we aim to double it to four flights per week,” APK operational director Riyanto Cahyono told The Jakarta Post via text message on Monday.last_img read more

Thanks for the amazing goals,Guingamp write Oparanozie

first_img Promoted ContentThe 10 Best Secondary Education Systems In The World10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do8 Shows You Didn’t Want To Watch At The EndThis 1982 Movie Is Better Than Any Other Blockbuster Up Today8 Things To Expect If An Asteroid Hits Our PlanetA Soviet Shot Put Thrower’s Record Hasn’t Been Beaten To This Day6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually True10 Actors That Started Their Careers On Soaps6 TV Characters Whose Departures Have Made The Shows Better8 Shows That Went From “Funny” To “Why Am I Watching This”Who Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?8 Scenes That Prove TV Has Gone Too Far After the premature end of the remaining matches in France due to the coronavirus pandemic, Oparanozie ended her six-year-long career with the French outfit. Goal broke the news a week ago following reports the club released six players, including the former Super Falcons captain in preparation for their 2020-21 season, according to French tabloid the Telegram. Other players also affected alongside Oparanozie were Manon Toti, Juliette Merle, Ekaterina Tyryshkina, Carlin Hudson and Agathe Fauvel, while Mali striker Aissata Traore and Cameroon midfielder Jeannette Yango were retained. The 26-year-old joined the Division 1 Feminine side following a short spell at Turkish women’s top-flight club Ataşehir Belediyespor in 2014 and scored more than 45 goals in 106 appearances during her sojourn with the French side. And Guingamp, who the Super Falcons star captained to a French Women’s Cup semi-final before the Covid-19 outbreak, has now given their thanks to the Nigerian, who they believe will thrive with her next club. Loading… Guingamp have expressed their appreciation to Desire Oparanozie after the Nigeria striker left the French women’s top-flight club, thanking her for the ‘amazing goals’ she scored. “We’ll miss you Oparanozie. Thanks for your smile and all the amazing goals. Good luck with your new challenge,” the club wrote on Twitter. The club’s message was coming on the heels of Oparanozie’s confirmation of her departure from the club along with her farewell message where she scored six goals in 12 matches, including a 40m stunner against Paris. Before joining Guingamp from Turkey, she previously starred for Bayelsa and Delta Queens in Nigeria before launching her professional career in Europe with an initial loan to Turkish side Luleburgaz 39 Spor in 2011. In 2012, She later joined Russian giants Rossiyanka, where she scored twice in 11 games, with one of her goals for Rossiyanka coming in her first-ever Uefa Women’s Champions League campaign against Sparta Praha the same year. She moved on from the Russian side to German club Wolfsburg on a two-year deal, but only managed to feature in one match for the senior team and later being relegated to the B-team which saw her return to Turkey with Atasehir. “After six fantastic years playing in France for Guingamp, I won’t be continuing with them for the next season. I will be starting a new chapter,” Oparanozie said in a video message posted on Twitter. read also:Oparanozie: I have opened a new chapter in my career “I want to use this opportunity to thank the club, the board members, the coaching crew, my teammates and most importantly the fans. Thank you for those amazing years.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

Befred online bingo advertisement not upheld by ASA

first_img StumbleUpon UK gambling adopts toughest online advertising code to protect underage audiences August 27, 2020 Submit The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has decided against upholding a complaint against a recent Betfred advert, after an individual questioned whether the broadcast normalised gambling.The advert in question featured a woman in the bath, a man preparing a meal and a woman exercising, all while playing online bingo on mobile devices.A voice-over could be heard during the advert, stating: “Love to chill in the bath? Make it a thrill and a laugh with Betfred bingo. Forget those two little ducks, soak up the action and win big bucks. You can even join in whilst making the tea with games from as little as just 1p.“Play with Betfred bingo and enjoy top promotions such as daily free bingo games, bonus back and more. Put the fun back into [the] house. Kick back and bingo with Betfred.”The complaint pertained to whether or not the advert could be construed as irresponsible. Betfred, in response to the complaint, commented: the ad did not suggest that people should play bingo excessively, or that it should take priority over any other social interaction.”The bookmaker further added that there was no promotion of high stakes gambling, nor were any negative associated emotions displayed during the advert either. The advert was intended to imply that playing online bingo could become a part of a player’s leisure time, and not something that could be essential to someone’s enjoyment.Furthermore, Betfred emphasised that gambling was not shown as being indispensable, characters were not displayed as being isolated figures and the ad did not portray a taboo or forbidden act which people should be ashamed of or hide, but the community aspect of bingo.The ASA, in response to the complaint, stated “the ad focused on how people could gamble using Betfred bingo while also undertaking tasks or leisure activities around the house. The characters taking a bath and exercising were shown playing bingo in conjunction with doing those tasks, rather than instead of them. Gambling was therefore not portrayed as taking priority over those tasks or as indispensable.“During the section showing the character preparing a meal, he was seen throwing food in the air when he realised he had won a prize. While we considered the character’s exaggerated reaction to winning showed he was briefly distracted from his task, again we did not consider that this scene portrayed gambling as taking priority in life.“We concluded that the ad did not portray, condone or encourage gambling behaviour that was socially irresponsible, or portray gambling as indispensable or as taking priority in life.” Related Articles Betfred counters Oppenheimer bid in race to rescue Phumelela August 26, 2020 Share ASA monitoring sweep marks gambling as the worst underage advertising offender August 26, 2020 Sharelast_img read more