Tara Page and David Aho

first_imgJim and Judy Page of Interlaken announce the engagement of their daughter Tara Page to David Aho, son of Amy Aho and the late Mike Aho of Little Silver.The bride-to-be is a student at the City University of New York. She is employed as a model at Ford Models of New York.The future groom received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Pennsylvania. He is a partner of Colbeck Capital Management.The couple met at Felix Restaurant in New York City. They live in Manhattan with their three cats: Gus of New York, and Ophelia and L.A., both of Anguilla, BVI.A fall 2012 wedding is planned.last_img read more

Microgrid Study To Determine Middletown’s Future Resiliency

first_imgBy Jay Cook |MIDDLETOWN – An effort to make the township more storm resilient while protecting many essential services is advancing.On Nov. 13 the governing body agreed to spend a $150,000 grant from the state Board of Public Utilities on a 12-month microgrid feasibility study. The goal is to explore the creation of a backup power source on a portion of Naval Weapons Station Earle’s waterfront base in Leonardo which would connect to more than a dozen municipal, county and federal services.“It’s a pretty big deal for us, when you think about what happened to Middletown after Sandy,” said Middletown Mayor Gerry Scharfenberger.A microgrid is defined by the BPU as “a group of interconnected loads and distributed energy resources (DER) within clearly defined electrical boundaries that acts as a single controllable entity with respect to the grid.” Microgrids have the ability to connect and disconnect from the electrical grid to enable it to operate in both grid-connected or island mode.The wish list of services being sought for connection to the microgrid are NWS Earle’s Waterfront Administration Area, Township of Middletown Sewage Authority, NY Waterways Ferry Terminal, Middletown Public Works and CNG Fueling Facilities, Middletown’s municipal complex, Leonardo Elementary School, Bayview Elementary School, Bayshore Middle School, Monmouth County Highway Department, Middletown Fire Stations 3, 4 and 7 and the Monmouth County Bayshore Outfall Authority, according to the BPU.Middletown was one of 13 entities in New Jersey awarded grant money in January by the BPU for the studies, which totaled over $2 million. Neptune Township was the only other Monmouth County town given a grant.Middletown officials are supporting the study, hoping it can provide significant backup to flood-prone areas along the Bayshore.Scharfenberger compared the township to a checkerboard with the microgrid protecting one or a few of the squares in a specific area.“I think we submitted a good proposal,” added township administrator Anthony Mercantante. “Because we were partnering with a federal agency, particularly the military, that made it attractive. We were also a town that was significantly impacted by the last two hurricanes, so clearly there’s a need for power resiliency along the coast.”Mercantante noted two specific areas in Middletown which could benefit the most: the Route 36 corridor and Port Monmouth. He said Route 36 is a key evacuation route out from the Bayshore which should have a backup.Also, Phase II of the $110 million Port Monmouth Flood Wall is under construction. “Reliable power to that during a storm is important,” Mercantante said, considering it would protect low-lying areas in the event of another major hurricane.Cooperation with NWS Earle was necessary for the study to go forward as preliminary plans have the microgrid positioned inside the base’s Leonardo post.Continuing to invest in storm resiliency is important for the United States Navy, said Dennis Blazak, NWS Earle’s community plans and liaison officer. He said NWS Earle suffered more than $50 million in damages and was out of power for a week after Super Storm Sandy.“It would mean that if we had another Hurricane Sandy, we’d still be able to operate and do our mission and work with our partners in the community,” Blazak said.William Addison, NWS Earle’s spokesman, said keeping military operations open is of utmost importance. He said NWS Earle is unique along the East Coast because of its ability to quickly supply ordnance to the Atlantic Fleet’s Carrier and Expeditionary Strike Groups.“Nobody can do it on the scale that we do it, and nobody can do it with the speed that we can,” Addison said. “That’s really where it comes into play for us.”Blazak also said microgrid consideration is laid out in the Joint Land Use Study, a federally funded project by the Department of Defense looking at how NWS Earle and its neighboring Monmouth County communities coexist.Mercantante said a microgrid would have no connection to the Monmouth County Reliability Project, a proposed 230-kV transmission line travelling from Aberdeen through Hazlet, Holmdel and Middletown before terminating in Red Bank. The Jersey Central Power & Light proposal currently sits before an Office of Administrative Law judge for a preliminary decision.Middletown awarded the $150,000 grant money to Leidos Engineering, a Massachusetts-based firm, and Scharfenberger anticipates a contract will be signed this week. Mercantante added a public hearing would ensue once the 12-month study is concluded. He also said it’s too early to tell what the cost of a microgrid would be if it’s found feasible, but said grant money and help from different agencies would be important.Addison echoed those statements, saying the study is a “joint effort.”“It can’t just be the Navy or the townships,” he said. “We certainly have to work together. We share that shoreline and we share that need.”This article was first published in the Nov. 16-23, 2017 print edition of the Two River Times.last_img read more

Red Bank Human Rights Advocates Urge Respect at Rally

first_imgBy Chris RotoloRED BANK –When he was practicing law on the social justice front, Rabbi Marc Kline spent the better part of a decade in Columbia, South Carolina, where he stood side by side with giants of the field like attorney Morris Dees and Martin Luther King III.Kline said that experience of working, advocating and going toe-to-toe with the Klu Klux Klan during a spree of mid-to-late ’90s church burnings has informed the way he approaches the battle against hatred and bigotry still being fought today in the Two River area, though frustration and exasperation are setting in.“I’m tired of combating the same force over and over and over again,” Kline said to a congregation of approximately 150 demonstrators, including state Sen. Vin Gopal (D-11) and Red Bank Mayor Pasquale Menna, who gathered outside Red Bank’s borough hall Aug. 30 to rally in support of the borough’s Human Relations Advisory Committee (HRAC) and the launch of its “No Hate at Home” campaign.“I’ve been fighting the Klan for many years, too long, and I’m tired of the hate,” Kline said. “It’s gotten uglier and uglier. And the Klan is code word for all hate speech right now.”Demonstrators gathered outside Red Bank’s Town Hall Aug. 31 to support a rally for the “No Hate at Home” campaign. Photo by Chris Rotolo.According to Kline, who leads the Monmouth Reform Temple in Tinton Falls, the initiative is a response to pro-KKK fliers distributed on Hudson Avenue Aug. 14 and KKK recruitment literature containing candy that was discovered on Leighton Avenue the week prior.Kline made it clear this campaign was comprehensive of all hate speech, including racial, religious and political prejudices he said are tearing society apart at the seams.“I’m tired of the fact that we can’t talk with each other without screaming at each other. We’re at a point where, if you don’t agree with me politically or religiously, you don’t have value. And then everyone goes about their business assuming they’re right…It really doesn’t matter what your politics are. There are some things that we’ve made partisan politics that are still about the human. And we’ve forgotten the human piece of it.”Leading the effort with Kline is David Pascal, who has served as the HRAC chair since 2006, and who hopes “No Hate at Home” can become a movement focused on respect and understanding between individuals, even if positions and ideas may not align.“For those who believe that another person can’t have value if you don’t agree, today that has to stop,” Pascal said. “This is about bringing respect for one another back into our homes, our communities, our places of business, schools, everywhere. It has to happen everywhere if we’re going to change the conversation and change the culture.”Kline and Pascal were adamant that this movement can only take hold if community members in attendance were willing to carry the message back into their own communities, a sentiment shared by Menna.According to Menna, the borough has a history of assisting the general community by providing an avenue for expression, quite literally providing a route through town earlier this year for the “March for our Lives” demonstration March 24 and again in July for the “Families Belong Together” protests. But he believes the key to ensuring “No Hate at Home” makes an impact is carrying the messaging beyond Red Bank’s borders.“The sense that I get is that people who participate in events like today’s are overwhelmingly from outside of Red Bank,” Menna said. “It tells me that the people we need to reach need to be reached in their own communities. For each person in the crowd today who is from Rumson or Little Silver, there are a thousand people who are not reached.”Menna said surrounding municipalities can’t be forced to form a committee similar to HRAC, but individuals from those communities should be making applications to their respective governing bodies to host the types of events “where people can voice their collective sentiments about human rights.”“The people (HRAC) is trying to reach are not the people who are living in Red Bank,” Menna said. “We already know about it. The people (HRAC) is trying to reach are the people who are living in the leafy communities of Rumson, Fair Haven, Little Silver, Monmouth Beach, Interlaken. That’s where the message has to go.”Kline called the Aug. 30 rally a good start, but said the work to ensure this is not a “one-off” begins now.“Rallies and marches are nice because you get to wave your flag and hold your sign and go home feeling good about it. But then what?” Kline said. “We need to have signs in yards, decals on cars and conversation in our communities. We need to create a change in our culture. With this rally, we’ve started the conversation.”This article was first published in the Sept. 6 – 13, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

Leafs bounce back to take the Steam out of Summerland

first_imgOne day after blowing a two-goal lead in a demoralizing loss to Murdoch Division rival Beaver Valley Nitehawks, the Nelson Leafs rebounded to double the Summerland Steam 4-2 in Kootenay International Junior Hockey League action Sunday afternoon at the NDCC Arena.Team captain Rayce Miller, who was very critical of his team following Saturday’s meltdown, provided the heroics for the Green and White by scoring the winning goal with seven minutes remaining in the game.The win allowed Nelson to nail down two of three wins during a three-game home stand. Summerland took a 1-0 lead after one period when Riley Pettitt scored 12 minutes into the frame.Nelson took a 2-1 lead after 40 minutes on goals by Nolan Percival, his first of the season, and Nicholas Ketola.Summerland tied the game two minutes into the third before Miller combined with Tyler Garcia and Levi Hulston to beat Matthew Huber in the Steam nets for the game-winning goal.Eamonn Miller scored into the empty net to secure the home-ice win for the Leafs.Patrick Ostermann was solid between the pipes to register the win in goal for Nelson.The Leafs, 6-5 on the season, now face Castlegar Rebels Wednesday in the Sunflower City.LEAF NOTES: Nolan Percival’s strong play earned the Nelson Minor Hockey grad the Leafs game star honour. Riley Pettitt was the game star for Summerland. . . . Nick Novin and Tyler Garcia each finished the game with two assists. . . . For the second time in two games, Nelson was out shot 33-29 by Summerland, including a 15-6 margin in the third period.last_img read more

HEAVILY FAVORED SILENT BIRD WINS FIFTH IN A ROW AS HE TAKES $63,000 SANTA ANITA ALLOWANCE FEATURE BY A NECK UNDER PRAT; TRAINED BY GLATT, HE GETS FLAT MILE ON MUDDY TRACK IN 1:36.52

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (Jan. 6, 2017)–In his first try around two turns, heavily favored Silent Bird ran down longshot El Huerfano late to take Friday’s $63,000 Santa Anita allowance feature by a neck under Flavien Prat.  Trained by Mark Glatt, the 5-year-old horse by Summer Bird got a flat mile in 1:36.52.In hand under Prat around the Club House turn, Silent Bird raced a close fifth past the half mile pole and was on the move in high gear while caught four-wide turning for home, giving punters momentary pause as he veered toward the middle of the track while straightening for home.“He was a little green once he made the lead,” said Prat.  “Once we straightened away, he was fine.”The 3-5 favorite in a field of six older horses, Silent Bird paid $3.60, $2.80 and $2.40.Owned by Norman Stables, LLC, Silent Bird was a winner of the seven furlong Damascus Stakes here two starts back on Nov. 4, and he was a game allowance winner at the same distance on Dec. 1 at Del Mar.  He now has five wins from six starts and with the winner’s share of $37,800, he increased his earnings to $208,800.“I was a little concerned that with this being his first time going long, he might get a little keen, but it was the opposite of that,” said Glatt.  When asked what might be next for the streaking Silent Bird, Glatt responded, “We’ll look at the San Antonio (Grade II, 1 1/16 miles on Feb. 4).  With all the heavy hitters seemingly out of town…Hopefully, he comes back good and we’ll go from there.Sent from the gate by Victor Espinoza, El Huerfano dictated terms throughout through fractions of 23.14, 45.96, 1:10.52 and 1:23.40 and battled back gamely at the rail when challenged a furlong out to finish five lengths in front of Avanti Bello.Off at 6-1, El Huerfano paid $5.20 and $3.60.Ridden by Mario Gutierrez, Avanti Bello was off at 5-1 and paid $3.60 to show.First post time for a nine-race card on Saturday at Santa Anita is at 12:30 p.m.  Admission gates open at 10:30 a.m.last_img read more

Bangladesh needs 12b fix fashion giants in rights drive

first_imgFive years ago this week, just after thousands of garment workers had settled in behind their sewing machines, a poorly built eight-story Bangladeshi factory complex called Rana Plaza buckled and collapsed. More than 1,130 people, mostly young women, died; 2,500 were injured, reports Reuters.In the years since the worst disaster ever in the apparel industry, Bangladesh has become a laboratory for testing factory safety. Western brands and retailers that source low-priced clothing in Bangladesh have inspected 2,300 active factories and pressured suppliers to make real improvements. Dozens of shoddily built facilities have closed altogether.But the Bangladesh experiment has been only partially successful. The European and American companies limited their reach and left thousands of factories untouched. The Bangladeshi government, meanwhile, has demonstrated little willingness to change its lackadaisical attitude toward regulation. Millions of garment workers remain at risk, especially those working for subcontractors-small second- and third-tier factories often completely unknown to Western brands.The turmoil in the wake of Rana Plaza constituted a public relations crisis for Western brands and retailers. Some 250 companies have formed a pair of initiatives: the European-dominated Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh, whose leadership includes trade unions, and the American-led Alliance for Bangladesh Worker Safety. These groups inspect factories, oversee remediation of safety problems, and collectively cut off any suppliers that fail to comply.Within their self-assigned jurisdictions – defined as the body of factories with which their members directly do business – the Accord and the Alliance have performed impressively. The Accord reports that 85 per cent of the hazards its inspectors identified have been fixed. These include blocked exits, inadequate sprinkler systems, faulty electrical wiring, and unstable support pillars. The Alliance reports an 88 per cent remediation rate.Catastrophic accidents have declined in Bangladesh. In 2013, there were 17 accidents, including Rana Plaza, that resulted in five or more deaths and/or 10 injured workers. Each year from 2014 through 2017, this number has hovered between two and five such accidents, according to data analysis contained in a new report by the NYU Stern Center for Business and Human Rights.But the mission of making factories safe in Bangladesh isn’t even close to done. The Accord and Alliance will not continue indefinitely. The Alliance plans to wrap up its work by the end of 2018. The Accord will renew its mandate every six months, but only through mid-2021. At some point, the factories that the two initiatives have overseen will return to the supervision of the Bangladeshi government, which is notorious for having ignored death traps like Rana Plaza and Tazreen Fashions, where a November 2012 fire killed 112.Subcontractors present a big challenge. These smaller shops help “mother” factories handle sudden volume increases and changed orders. No one has an exact count of subcontractors, most of which operate with little or no regulation. While the NYU Stern Center estimates that there may be as many as 3,000 of these factories, the government denies a subcontracting system even exists.But on a recent fact-finding trip, researchers from the NYU Stern Center visited two subcontracting factories of 150 and 200 workers each. They weren’t hard to find. At one, the owner told of receiving a list of fire-safety mandates from a government inspector. The owner said he’d lost the list and, in any event, didn’t have the money to install sprinklers or a fire alarm. He didn’t seem in the least concerned.It’s vital that the Bangladeshi government recognises the presence of garment subcontractors – as well as its larger long-term duty to regulate the industry with vigour. In the short term, though, those with an interest in the country’s apparel business ought to band together and finance a task force devoted to finishing the work the Accord and Alliance have begun.A “shared responsibility” task force could seek to address human rights challenges by means of the collective action of major stakeholders. Variations on the model have been used for years by international organizations that convene donor conferences to respond to refugee crises. In the supply-chain context, the goal ought to be protecting workers and spreading the benefits of globalisation more evenly.The task force should be Bangladeshi-led and include Western brands and retailers that have profited from selling Bangladeshi-made clothes. Western governments also need to step up, recognizing that their citizens benefit from the opportunity to buy these clothes at low prices. Traditional international funding agencies like the World Bank also ought to do much more to protect the workers in this sector. There is a role for private philanthropies, too.A rough estimate of how much such a task force should seek to raise is $1.2 billion. This represents an approximation of the number of factories that haven’t been renovated multiplied by $250,000 – a ballpark figure for an average remediation.Whatever budget the task force sets for itself, the amount should be understood as paying for the attainment of safety today. Once current gaps have been addressed, responsibility ought to shift to the government of Bangladesh. The fifth anniversary of Rana Plaza calls for a renewed and collective commitment to a safe and secure garment industry.According to British charity War on Want, garments exports account for 80 per cent of Bangladesh’s total export revenue, reports AFP.But even today, garments workers’ rights remain far from guaranteed, with many working 14 to 16 hour days at some of Bangladesh’s 4,500 factories, the organisation says.- ‘Never again’? -As Western consumers grow more socially and environmentally conscious, the fashion houses that have long relied on factories like those in the Rana Plaza have battled to redeem themselves.Primark, for one, says it “continues to support those who were affected and … has contributed a total of over $14 million in aid and compensation”.It also says it launched a programme of building inspections “to assess its suppliers’ factories against international standards” six weeks after the building collapse, and that it “remains committed” to improving the Bangladeshi garment industry as a whole.Swedish retail giant H&M, which says it never used the Rana Plaza factories to produce garments, is nonetheless committed to ensuring greater “social and environmental progress” in Bangladesh.On 19 April, H&M said in a statement that 450,000 textile workers at 227 factories in Bangladesh that produce garments for its stores worldwide “are now represented by democratically elected representatives”.The role of these representatives is to “speak on behalf of the workers when discussions are held about for example working hours, working conditions, health and security issues”, the statement said.- ‘Appalling’ conditions -More broadly, the International Labour Organisation launched a programme following the disaster, to “enhance safety in factories so that the country should never again experience a tragedy like the Rana Plaza collapse”.The ILO programme includes training for local producers in chemical safety, inspection of over 1,500 factories for building and fire safety, labour inspection, and an improved culture of safety in the workplace.Celine Choain, a garment industry specialist at the Paris-based Kea Partners consultancy, said that while there has definitely been progress, much remains to be done.”The incident definitely acted as a catalyst for brands” to put in place changes in the way they produce their garments, Choain told AFP.She noted that two thirds of the 1,700 Bangladeshi factories inspected following an ILO-sponsored safety agreement successfully corrected 75 per cent of the breaches that were identified.However, wages remain dismally low, according to War on Want, which last week described working conditions for the vast majority of Bangladesh’s garment factory workers as “appalling”.Many garment workers earn little more than the minimum wage of 5,300 taka ($65, 53 euros) per month.last_img read more

Hearst Magazines Plans Clevver Relaunch From New Production Studio at Santa Monica

first_img ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 New York-based Hearst Magazines has established an L.A. outpost for video production — where Clevver, its recently acquired network of entertainment news YouTube channels, will be gearing up for a relaunch within the next few weeks.The publishing group opened a new, 20,000-square-foot multimedia production studio in Santa Monica, Calif., which will serve as a hub for its magazine brands’ original productions and Clevver, which was left stranded after former parent company Defy Media shut down last fall.Clevver’s YouTube channels have largely been dormant since early November, when its employees were let go with Defy’s shuttering. The Clevver team that Hearst Magazines has rehired will resume producing videos within the next two weeks, according to a company rep. Those staffers include Jill Irvin Burriss, senior creative director of Clevver Style; the Hearst rep declined to identify which Clevver hosts are on board. (Pictured above: The set of Clevver News’ “Daily Hollywood Rundown” in the new Santa Monica facility.) The studio space, located at the Santa Monica Airport, will build on Hearst Magazines’ original entertainment projects. Those have included TV series like “Ready, Set, Pet” for the CW Network, and digital series including “This Is How I Made It,” “The Braid Up,” “Song Association” and “Go to Bed With Me.” The company also will use the studio for photo shoots and video productions across Hearst Magazines’ portfolio of titles including Cosmopolitan, Elle, Esquire and Harper’s Bazaar.“A robust presence on the West Coast is a natural next step for us as we continue to expand our creative capabilities and deepen our talent pool,” Hearst Magazines president Troy Young said in a statement. “Video has been a consistent growth driver for us and this studio will further enhance the quality and quantity of our entertainment offerings.”Michael Mraz, VP of Hearst originals and development, is heading the new studio. He’ll remain based in New York and split his time between NYC and in Los Angeles. He joined the company in 2014 and previously led digital content teams for Esquire, Esquire U.K., Road & Track, Car and Driver, Popular Mechanics and Town & Country before joining development team in 2016.“The new studio — and having the Clevver teams based there — will be a game-changer for us,” Mraz said. “It will enable us to be more ambitious with our development slate for Hearst Originals, learn from some of the very best of YouTube natives, and find new ways to cross pollinate ideas, talent, and brands between New York and L.A.”Hearst Magazines, a unit of Hearst, claims its print and digital properties reach a combined audience of 146 million readers and visitors monthly, including 73% of U.S. women. The company publishes more than 300 editions and 240 websites around the world, with more than 25 brands in the U.S.center_img Popular on Variety last_img read more