Dortmund defender Delaney urges Sancho to resist Man Utd move

first_imgBorussia Dortmund defender, Thomas Delaney, has urged Jadon Sancho to resist Manchester United move. The winger remains a big-money target for Manchester United, though BVB directors are insisting he now won’t be sold. Delaney says: “We have better opportunities when Jadon stays. He is one of the best players in the Bundesliga. One just has to look at his goals and assists last season.Advertisement Promoted ContentA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic BombsWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?20+ Albino Animals That Are Very Rare And UniqueTop 10 Disney Male Role Models6 Unusual Facts About Bollywood, Pollywood And Tollywood7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The UniverseWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?Contemplate Life At These 10 Stargazing Locations9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A Tattoo5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks7 Enigmatic Discoveries That Left Everyone BaffledThe Models Of Paintings Whom The Artists Were Madly In Love With Loading… center_img read also:Man Utd vow not to give up on Sancho signing despite Dortmund claims “He’s still very young and I do not know if he will get even better. But I expect a lot from him next season. “He’s just extraordinarily talented.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

Keck offers new biology elective

first_imgPhoto courtesy of USCBeginning Spring 2018, the Keck School of Medicine will offer a new two-unit elective course, “SCRM 517: Historical and Contemporary Stem Cell Research.” The course, which is geared toward master’s students, will be taught by Professor Rong Lu in the Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine. Lu plans to cover significant developments in stem cell research history. Unlike other courses, she says SCRM 517 will also emphasize the experimental techniques and methods used in past developments, allowing students to gain applicable skills for future research.“[The course’s] idea is to think about how to address the question, how to design the experiment and to understand the goal of the experiment, the potential problem, and what are the new knowledge we can gain from the experiment,” Lu said. “[This will give] them an overview of experimental design and … a platform to discuss the research and potential problems.”While Lu will start teaching the course in her third year at USC, the idea for the course came years prior during her postdoctoral work under Professor Irving Weissman at Stanford’s Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine. Weissman noted that while many classes involved research, few taught students how to do so. With that, an idea was born.“[Research is the] kind of a thing we are doing everyday but there’s not … a direct thing [to teach that],” Lu said. “Most of the courses just teach you what we learn from those studies, but exactly how those studies came about, why people do this study … how does those specific study … give us the new knowledge [isn’t taught].”Although Lu is unsure how many will take the course, she hopes to have between 10 and 20 students enrolled to ensure a workshop-style feel in the class. To provide a refreshing and entertaining perspective on course materials, Lu will also utilize in-class discussions and exercises based on the research conducted to allow students to practice their skills. And for Lu, there’s no better discussion topic than stem cells. She’s been fascinated with them since 1997, when Dolly the sheep became the world’s first cloned mammal, during her senior year of high school. “I feel like this is a very interesting question, a very interesting problem and also has enormous medical potential,” she said. She hopes the class will spark in her students the same inquisitive interest that’s driven her for the past 20 years. “I want it to be a little bit more interactive … [with] more experimental and more exploring in class,” Lu said.last_img read more