Joshua reveals why he visited Nigeria as a non-champion

first_imgRead Also: Four-goal Shakhtar set up Europa League semi against Inter“I’ve just got a bit more of a Nigerian accent behind me now. Yeah, it was a good experience. And that was the last time I went since last year and this time I went back as a champion.“So it was important. I took my belts out there, connected with the people. So yeah, it means a lot that we went there. My cousin went there. My son went there for the first time, stuff like that. So it was good.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Previously, Anthony Joshua had visited Nigeria for six months when he was just eleven.“So what happened I think where parents find it difficult is that let’s say you’re earning a thousand pounds a month in the UK. But rather than just getting the best things here in the UK and establishing yourself, there’ll be a situation where they’re still trying to build back home.“So there was going back and forth. So my mum wanted to go back and do some business there. So what I thought was a holiday was actually me going to school.“So that’s just the way it is in a lot of these communities where it’s home to my mum, but for me, I remember just crying, walking down this long stretch of about 300 meters into boarding school. A complete culture shock.“And when I say culture shock is because of the way of the Nigerians. When you land at Nigerian Airport, you know you’re in Nigeria. You know you’re on your own. No police can save you. I mean, you got to make sure you’ve got your people, you know who you’re dealing with, someone’s coming to pick you up, that type of vibe.“So when I got there, it was just a massive culture shock that this isn’t a territory I’m familiar with. So I just had to pick it up quickly and I settled in quick.“And before I know it, I was back in the UK because my mum’s business didn’t go to plan. And here we are, again, we’re back to the estate with my friends. Advertisement Loading… Anthony Joshua has revealed why he opted to visit Nigeria after losing his world titles in devastating fashion on June 1, 2019, in the US. Across the boxing world AJ’s defeat to Andy Ruiz Jr. was seen as an opportunity for the Olympic gold medalist to undergo a firm reality check. Although,  Joshua later regained his world titles months later,but in between, he decided to visit his homeland in Nigeria. Speaking during an interview on Apple’s ‘Songs for Life’ recently, the 30-year-old Joshua explained why he opted for the moment after leaving Nigeria for the UK as a child. “When I went to Nigeria the first time in maybe 17 years, I went there as a non-champion. And it was fine to go back, but people say, “Why did you come back as a non-champion?” I say, “Because you respect me as a person whether I have the belts or not. Don’t ever judge me for that. You respect me first,” said Joshua. “So that was my message as well and it was just the right time. When you’re winning, everyone wants a piece of you. When I had lost, I had more time to do what I wanted to do. “So it was just a time to go back and see family or friends. Promoted ContentThe Highest Paid Football Players In The WorldCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?The 10 Best Secondary Education Systems In The WorldWhat Are The Most Delicious Foods Out There?Most Beloved First Ladies Of All TimeWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right Now5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks10 Of The Best Places Around The World To Go StargazingThese Hilariously Creative Shower Curtains Will Make Your Day7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty Pennylast_img read more

NSAIDs use may increase cardiovascular risk associated with osteoarthritis

first_imgJun 13 2018Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cornerstone of pain management in patients with osteoarthritisThe results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) suggest that over two thirds of the increased cardiovascular risk associated with osteoarthritis is linked to the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).Osteoarthritis is a common condition that makes a person’s joints stiff and painful, particularly in the morning. It is caused by, amongst others, thinning of the cartilage within the joints, which allows the bones to rub against each. Joint swelling and pain are frequent symptoms. It is the most common of all the different types of arthritis, and typically becomes more common as people get older.”The examination of cardiovascular risk among individuals with osteoarthritis is an important area of research as very little is known about the association, despite osteoarthritis being the most common rheumatic disease with high prevalence among the elderly,” said Professor Thomas Dörner, Chairperson of the Abstract Selection Committee, EULAR. “This study is important because it provides new information about the potential causal role of NSAIDs for the observed cardiovascular complications among individuals with osteoarthritis.”Recent research suggests that osteoarthritis is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and several mechanisms have been suggested to account for this association. One of these is the frequent use of NSAIDs in the treatment of osteoarthritis as they have been shown to be a proven risk factor for CVD.Related StoriesResearchers report new regenerative medicine approach for treating osteoarthritis of the kneeDaily life disability before hip replacement may predict poor post-operative outcomesUsing gene therapy strategies to rejuvenate aging cells and treat osteoarthritis”To the best of our knowledge, this is the first longitudinal study to evaluate the mediating role of NSAID use in the relationship between osteoarthritis and CVD in a large population‐based sample,” said Professor Aslam Anis, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia (study author). “Our results indicate that osteoarthritis is an independent risk factor for CVD and suggest a substantial proportion of the increased risk is due to the use of NSAIDs. This is highly relevant because NSAIDs are some of the most commonly used drugs to manage pain in patients with osteoarthritis.”Results of the study demonstrate that people with osteoarthritis had a 23% higher risk of developing CVD. The increased risk of congestive heart failure (CHF), ischemic heart disease (IHD), and stroke was 42%, 17% and 14% respectively. Investigators then calculated the impact of NSAID use on the increased risk and found that 68% of the total effect of osteoarthritis on CVD risk was due to NSAID use. The proportion of the increased risk due to NSAIDs seen in CHF was calculated at 45% and more than 90% for IHD and stroke respectively.This population-based cohort study used data from 7,743 osteoarthritis patients and 23,229 non-osteoarthritis controls matched for age and gender from health administrative data from British Columbia, Canada. Statistical analysis was used which adjusted the results for age, gender, socioeconomic status, body mass index, and several conditions known to be associated with CVD, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, and Romano comorbidity score. Source:https://www.congress.eular.org/last_img read more