Packers lost Khalil Mack bid because Raiders didn’t like draft pick, says Green Bay CEO

first_img NFL decision on Tyreek Hill ‘stuns’ league observers NFL free agency news: Bills add veteran safety Kurt Coleman as Rafael Bush retires Green Bay really wanted to trade for Khalil Mack last year, but Oakland apparently thought the Packers were too good, so to speak.A little explanation is in order. As reported last summer, Green Bay was one of the front-runners to land the former NFL Defensive Player of the Year. The Raiders, of course, ended up trading Mack to the Bears for first-round picks in 2019 and 2020, a third-round pick in 2020 and a sixth-round pick in 2019. Sean McVay says Rams’ Super Bowl loss on his mind ‘every minute’ Green Bay President and CEO Mark Murphy told 105.7 The Fan in Milwaukee that the Packers “aggressively” pursued Mack, but he thinks the Raiders assumed the Packers would finish with a better record than the Bears last year, and thus the Bears would have a better draft position.“Well the whole Khalil Mack thing. It’s not that we didn’t try,” Murphy said. “We were aggressive. We wanted to sign him. I think, ironically, the Raiders took the Bears offer because they thought they would be a better draft pick.” Related News We all know what happened after the trade. The Bears, thanks in large part to Mack, went on to finish 12-4 and win the NFC Central. The Packers finished 6-9-1. As a result, Green Bay had the 12th overall pick, while the Raiders ended up picking 24th with the pick they acquired from Chicago for Mack.Murphy did concede that it might not have made financial sense for the Packers to acquire Mack, who ended up signing a six-year deal reportedly worth $141 million, after signing quarterback Aaron Rodgers to a record-breaking four-year, $134 million deal.“I don’t know if it is good to have the highest-paid offensive player in the league, and the highest-paid defensive player in the league,” Murphy said. “Is that a good way to build a team?”last_img read more

Arthur Johnson, 87, Oxford: Feb. 4, 1929 – June 25, 2016

first_imgArthur JohnsonArthur M. Johnson, 87, of Oxford died Saturday, June 25, 2016 at the Kansas Veterans Home in Winfield.Funeral Services will be held at 10 a.m., Wednesday, June 29, 2016 at the Oxford Christian Church. Visitation will be held on June 28, 2016 from 12 until 8 p.m., with the family receiving friends from 5 to 7 p.m. at Oxford Funeral Service Chapel. Memorials have been established with the Kansas Veterans Home and Oxford Church of Christ and may be left with Oxford Funeral Service. Burial will be at the Oxford Cemetery. Arrangements are with Oxford Funeral Service. For further information please visit www.oxfordfuneralservice.com.Arthur Milton Johnson was born on February 4, 1929, the son of John and Ruth (Putnam) Johnson in Spencer, NE. He was known to his family and friends as Art or Johnny. He graduated from Spencer Nebraska High School in 1946 and joined the U.S. Air Force in 1948 and was a training mechanics instructor. Following service he worked briefly for O’Neill Outlaw Grocery and then for H.C. Leach Oil Field Construction. He worked on in-flight refueling and rebuilding helicopters during the Vietnam War.Art was also a defense contractor administrator as the regional manager of DCA’s quality assurance completing 33 years of civil service. On March 3, 1951 Art was united in marriage to Margaret Leach. They lived in Electra, TX, O’Neill, NE, Holliday, TX, and Amarillo before moving to Oxford, KS in 1973. Art was a member of the Oxford Church of Christ.Art is survived by his three children: Larry Johnson and his wife Linda of Winfield, Gary Johnson and his wife Susan of Oxford, and Susan Spoon and her husband Robert of Oxford; grandchildren: Jonathan Johnson and his wife Abby of  Dexter, Daniel Spoon and his wife Stephanie of Oxford, Kaly Spoon of Oxford, Seth Johnson of Derby, Aaron Johnson and his wife Eden of Clearwater, Kaydee Johnson and Laura Riggs of Winfield, and Zac Johnson of Oxford, Jessica Lucas of Lawrence, Nick Lucas of Wellington, and Mary Lucas of Winfield; great grandchildren: Keaton and Charlee Johnson, Grayson Drake, Kase and Kale Johnson, Reignor Abasolo, Mary Tyler, Corbin and Carson Lucas; two sisters: Helen and Duane Bolliger and Caroline Rossi and one brother, Leo Johnson.He is preceded in death by his parents, his loving wife, Margaret, two brothers: Carlton “Buck” Johnson and Kenny Johnson, and 3 sisters: Evelyn Liable, Nancy Gamble and Opal “Soapy” Miller.last_img read more

Facebook Google Apple and Amazon will answer questions from regulators during a

first_imgThe Fed Has Concerns About Facebook’s LibraFed Chairman Jerome Powell explains why.ShareVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.04%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time –:- Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PauseMuteCurrent Time 0:10/Duration 0:15Loaded: 0%0:10Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:05 Playback Rate1xFullscreenAmid calls for big tech to be regulated—and even broken up—Facebook, Google, Apple, and Amazon will face questions from lawmakers at several hearings on Tuesday that could serve as a flashpoint for how regulators deal with big tech in the future.”These are the early stage discussions focused on understanding the underlying issues to solve the right problems,” says Jason Kint, CEO of Digital Content Next, a trade group that represents media organizations.On Tuesday at 2 p.m. ET, the four tech giants will send representatives to answer questions in front of the House Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee. Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI), the leader of the panel, has pledged to review the alleged anti-competitive practices of the tech giants and “how consolidation is hurting entrepreneurs.”In terms of antitrust, Kint thinks the hearing will show Congress taking a step away from the tech companies. “Look at the long, documented history of Facebook making decisions that benefit the company over consumers,” he says. “Despite growing distrust, and in light of that, can we envision giving them that sort of role over the future?”While the four tech giants will testify together, Kint says he expects they’ll be quick to point out their differences and perhaps some will put distance between themselves and Facebook.”There is a lot of momentum in antitrust around the platforms’ use of data privacy,” Kint says. “Apple has a pro-consumer viewpoint that is different than Facebook and Google, for instance.”In addition, the Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a hearing called “Google and Censorship Through Search Engines” on Tuesday afternoon. Karan Bhatia, Google’s vice president for government affairs and public policy, will answer questions in the hearing, which will be presided over by Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), who has been a vocal critic about perceived conservative censorship. Kint will testify during this hearing, along with a panel of other experts, including Andy Parker, the father of slain journalist Alison Parker, and Dennis Prager, founder of the conservative site PragerU.In two hearings this week, Facebook’s plan to release its Libra cryptocurrency will be scrutinized on Capitol Hill. David Marcus, head of Facebook’s cryptocurrency initiative, will testify before the Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday at 10 a.m., and the House Financial Services Committee on Wednesday at 10 a.m.”Our first goal is to create utility and adoption, enabling people around the world—especially the unbanked and underbanked—to take part in the financial ecosystem,” he plans to tell lawmakers, according to prepared remarks released on Monday.Marcus’s testimony comes as politicians and government officials have expressed scrutiny about Facebook’s plan to release its Calibra digital wallet and Libra cryptocurrency in 2020.In his remarks, Marcus says Facebook won’t release Libra until all regulatory concerns are “fully addressed.” He added that it will be registered with the Department of the Treasury and won’t compete with sovereign currencies.Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.) is working on a proposal called the “Keep Big Tech Out of Finance Act,” which would prohibit large internet companies from becoming a financial institution or offering cryptocurrencies.Last week, Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell told the House Financial Services Committee he’s concerned about Libra.”While the project’s sponsors hold out the possibility of public benefits, including improved financial access for consumers, Libra raises many serious concerns regarding privacy, money laundering, consumer protection and financial stability,” Powell says. “These are concerns that should be thoroughly and publicly addressed before proceeding.”Ultimately, this week will be about taking another step toward ensuring big tech is accountable, learns from its mistakes of the past, and moves forward with an approach that respects the rights of consumers, Kint says.”These companies are the most powerful, most valuable and most innovative companies on the planet,” he says. “They do have unbelievable amounts of resources and engineering talent and ideas and employee capital to do things better.”More must-read stories from Fortune:—The fall and rise of VR: The struggle to make virtual reality get real—A new A.I. is running the table against poker pros. Is business strategy next?—Video game addiction: These are the warning signs to look out for—Apple has new MacBooks. Here’s what you need to know—Listen to our new audio briefing, Fortune 500 DailyCatch up with Data Sheet, Fortune’s daily digest on the business of tech.Catch up with Data Sheet, Fortune’s daily digest on the business of tech.You May LikeEntertainmentSass as a Strategy: How Netflix’s Twitter Became Just as Entertaining as Its Shows and MoviesHealthFormer GE CEO Jeff Immelt: To Combat Costs, CEOs Should Run Health Care Like a BusinessHealthFor Edie Falco, an ‘Attitude of Gratitude’ After Surviving Breast CancerLeadershipGhosn Back, Tesla Drop, Boeing Report: CEO Daily for April 4, 2019AutosElon Musk’s Plan to Boost Tesla Sales Is Dealt a SetbackMPWJoe Biden, Netflix Pregnancy Lawsuit, Lesley McSpadden: Broadsheet April 4last_img read more