MLB legend Rod Carew discusses ‘the gift of time’ and the 2018 Rose Parade

first_imgFor Mary and Ralf Reuland, the image of their son Konrad Reuland’s face appearing on this year’s Donate Life Rose Parade float is bittersweet.PreviousRhonda Carew and her husband Rod Carew adjacent to a Donate Life Float exhibit at Pasadena Hilton in Pasadena Friday December 29, 2017. Transplant recipient Carew will be among the floatÕs 17 riders. In December 2016 Carew received a heart and kidney transplant and these two organs helped him regain health after suffering a massive heart attack the prior year. His donor was former NFL tight end Konrad Reuland, who will be present on the float through one of 44 floragraphs honoring donors whose generous act gave others a second chance at life. (Photo by Walt Mancini/Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Former NFL Coach Sam Wyche and Rod Carew, sports legends, meeting at Pasadena Hilton Friday, December 29, 2017. They will be among the riders on the Donate Life Float at the 2018 Tournament of Roses Parade. sports legends. San Wyche received a donated heat and Rod Carew received a donated heart and kidney. (Photo by Walt Mancini/Pasadena Star-News/SCNG) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsDeceased NFL tight end Konrad Reuland, donated a heart and kidney to Baseball Hall of Famer Rod Carew, who will ride on the Donate Life float in the Rose Parade. Parents met Rod Carew at Pasadena Hilton Friday, December 29, 2017.Mary and Ralf Reuland adjacent to a photo of their deceased son, NFL tight end Konrad Reuland. Konrad Reuland donated a heart and kidney to Baseball Hall of Famer Rod Carew, who will ride on the Donate Life float in the Rose Parade. Parents met Rod Carew at Pasadena Hilton Friday, December 29, 2017. (Photo by Walt Mancini/Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Rhonda Carew and her husband Rod Carew adjacent to a Donate Life Float exhibit at Pasadena Hilton in Pasadena Friday December 29, 2017. Transplant recipient Carew will be among the floatÕs 17 riders. In December 2016 Carew received a heart and kidney transplant and these two organs helped him regain health after suffering a massive heart attack the prior year. His donor was former NFL tight end Konrad Reuland, who will be present on the float through one of 44 floragraphs honoring donors whose generous act gave others a second chance at life. (Photo by Walt Mancini/Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 4Rhonda Carew and her husband Rod Carew adjacent to a Donate Life Float exhibit at Pasadena Hilton in Pasadena Friday December 29, 2017. Transplant recipient Carew will be among the floatÕs 17 riders. In December 2016 Carew received a heart and kidney transplant and these two organs helped him regain health after suffering a massive heart attack the prior year. His donor was former NFL tight end Konrad Reuland, who will be present on the float through one of 44 floragraphs honoring donors whose generous act gave others a second chance at life. (Photo by Walt Mancini/Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)ExpandOn one hand, it’s a reminder that Konrad is gone. On the other hand, it’s an opportunity to remember his generosity — and inspire viewers worldwide to designate their organs for donation.“Coming to these bigger events, it’s not like a dream world, it’s reality, and it hits us emotionally,” said Ralf Reuland, of San Juan Capistrano. “By the same token, it’s a very wonderful thing he’s being recognized among other donors, and bringing awareness to organ donation with such a huge platform like the Rose Parade is a phenomenal thing.”This year’s Donate Life float’s theme is “The Gift of Time,” and that’s exactly the gift that Konrad Reuland gave about a year ago to baseball legend Rod Carew, who will ride on the float New Year’s Day. A football player at Mater Dei and Mission Viejo high schools, Stanford and the NFL, Konrad suffered a brain aneurysm at age 29 that claimed his life. Because he was a registered organ donor, his heart went to Carew. Carew said he’s feeling strong these days, and he attributes that to Konrad’s heart beating in his chest.“We’re always together, and we’re going to do good things together by spreading the word about organ and tissue donation,” Carew, 72, said.With his physical therapy assignment mostly done, Carew said he’d like to travel with his wife, Rhonda, and continue to use his name and presence to promote organ and tissue donation. The Carews said they hope to get either or both MLB and the NFL to officially support the Donate Life campaign.Carew also promotes heart health education via his “The Heart of 29” campaign in partnership with the American Heart Association. The campaign was named after Carew’s uniform number with the Minnesota Twins and California Angels, but it holds an even greater significance now because Konrad was 29 years old when he died.Carew and Konrad met about 15 years ago at a middle school basketball game in Rancho Santa Margarita. Carew’s son and Konrad’s younger brother were teammates, and at one point teenage Konrad went up to Carew to introduce himself and to say that one day he hoped to be a professional athlete like him. Mary Reuland told Carew later that Konrad was elated to have met him.For Carew, the gift of time has several meanings — in this case, many years after Carew showed Konrad kindness by spending a few moments with him, Konrad gave Carew the greatest gift any person can give to another, Carew said.Including Carew, a total of 75 people received organ and tissue donations from Konrad.“I believe in the saying that if you do good, good will come back to you,” Carew said. “I hope people can come back into the lives of others to help.”Those interested in becoming organ, eye or tissue donors can visit donatelife.net.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Kobe’s homecoming soiled with poor play in Lakers’ 103-91 loss to Sixers

first_imgPHILADELPHIA >> The night started with Kobe Bryant receiving loud cheers and performing as if Father Time never became an issue. But it ended with the 37-year-old Bryant showing his age and the Lakers showing their ineptitude.The Lakers hit a new low in a season full of them. They lost to the Philadelphia 76ers 103-91 on Tuesday at Wells Fargo Center, an outcome that handed the Sixers their first victory after 19 games and soiled Bryant’s last game before a hometown crowd that suddenly loved him. It also raised questions about the Lakers (2-15) amid a six-game losing streak and the worst record in the Western Conference. Will the 37-year-old Bryant ever figure out how to manage his health? Bryant finished with 20 points while shooting 7 of 26 from the field and 4 of 17 from 3-point range in 31 minutes. He has attempted 16 or more 3-pointers only two other times in his 20-year NBA career. Bryant lamented his legs stiffening up on him despite altering his routine on when to stretch, take ice baths and lift weights. Yet, Bryant maintained he will try to play as many games as possible, including today’s game in Washington. “I’m not going to save myself for pickup basketball at Equinox in December. I’m going to play,” Bryant said. “I’m not coming back to these venues anymore. God willing, I’m healthy and I can walk and run, I’ll be out there.”Will Bryant ever change his shot selection? Bryant made three of his first four shots within the first two minutes. That sparked Bryant to say, “I’m just playing possum because I know my legs can’t carry this energy for 48 minutes.” That sparked Lakers coach Byron Scott to say, “I was hoping he could keep it up.” But after ending the first quarter with 13 points on 5-of-10 shooting, Bryant missed 14 of his next 16 shots. Scott conceded Bryant took some 3-pointers that were “ill-advised.” But the coach quickly said, “I didn’t do a good job” in setting Bryant up for shots in the mid-post. Yet, Bryant also shot a few airballs and even attempted a left-handed layup that just hit the backboard. “I do trust he’ll get to a point where he will make them on a much more consistent basis. But it’s just not happening yet,” Scott said. “There’s going to be some games like that where you live and die with it. You just hope you don’t die too much.”Will the Lakers’ patience with the team’s X’s and O’s wear thin?No one in the Lakers’ locker room criticized Bryant’s shot selection. Guards Jordan Clarkson and Nick Young actually defended it. But Clarkson, Young and Lou Williams all lamented the team’s struggles with making adjustments.“We have to make the game easier on (Kobe) instead of trying to iso,” said Clarkson, who had 19 points on 9-of-19 shooting. “We can get screens for him. We put more emphasis on that instead of having all eyes on him the whole game, that’s taxing.But what will it take for that to happen?“You can’t blame (Kobe). He takes a lot of shots. But it’s everybody,” Young said. “From the coaches to the players, we have to get on one page and on the same page. I can’t tell you why that’s not happening right now. All I know is the circus came to town today and we did what we normally do.”The circus featured an extra element in Philadelphia. Bryant’s first road game since announcing his retirement happened to be his hometown, which he admitted became a “cherry on top” and partly planned. He had sparked boos during the 2001 NBA Finals and the 2002 NBA All-Star game, but the overwhelmingly partisan Lakers crowd cheered and yelled his name during starting lineup introductions.Bryant then met his high school coach, Gregg Downer of Lower Merion High, and Sixers luminary Julius Erving at center court. Then, Bryant was presented with a No. 24 Lower Merion jersey. After the game ended, Bryant touched his chest twice near his heart and waved to the crowd as he walked off the court. “They got me. I wasn’t expecting that,” Bryant said. “It was emotional. I’m deeply appreciative beyond belief.”Then Bryant spoke in a bizarre press conference where non-media members asked him questions after drinking beverages. Others told Bryant they loved him. Bryant soon thanked reporters when the press conference ended. The vibes in the Lakers’ locker room were not as pleasant.“We’re a circus,” Young said. “We’re playing terrible. We lost to Philly. Philly! What does that make us?”center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Vlado Zadro – new player of Široki Brijeg

first_imgFormer football player of Široki Brijeg, Zrinjski, and Zagreb Vlado Zadro will again play for BIH premier league team of Široki Brijeg, reports sportsport.baFootball club Široki Brijeg by winning the Cup of BIH has qualified to play at the European Championship.Zadro confirmed to sportsport.ba that he has signed a two-year contract with Široki Brijeg and added he hopes that his team will do well in Europe.(photo:  prvaliga.tportal)last_img