Richard “Dick” McDaniel, age 61

first_imgRichard “Dick” McDaniel, 61, of Metamora, IN died Saturday, January 16, 2016 at Christ Hospital, Cincinnati, where he had been a patient for several months.He was born June 20, 1954 in Laurel, IN, one of ten children of Richard and Etta Gumm McDaniel and was a lifelong resident of Franklin County.A 1972 graduate of Laurel High School, in July of 1972 he enlisted in the U. S. Navy and served a tour of duty in Vietnam. He was awarded the National Defense Service Medal and Meritorious Unit Commendation. He was honorably discharged in 1974.On January 18, 1975, he was married to Anita Reece of Metamora in Rushville, IN. Mrs. McDaniel survives.He had been employed for several years at Sperry Rubber in Brookville and had also managed Gulley’s Sunoco Station in Metamora. For many years, he was employed by the U. S. Postal Service in both Brookville and Connersville. After his retirement, he worked as an assessor in Greensburg.In his leisure, he enjoyed watching sports, coaching basketball and was a car enthusiast. He loved spending time with his nieces and nephews.Survivors besides his wife include three brothers, Clarence McDaniel and wife, Malvery, of Ft. Wayne, IN, Walker McDaniel, of Milroy, IN and Marvin McDaniel and wife, Cheryl, of Laurel; and a number of nieces and nephews and great nieces and nephews.He was preceded in death by his parents; three brothers, Bill, Charlie and James and three sisters, Ginny, Gladys and Ann.Funeral services will be conducted by Reverend Wayne Ison and Reverend Tom Marshall at 2 PM Friday, January 22, 2016 at the Metamora Church of God, 20152 US 52, where friends may call from 4 until 8 PM Thursday. Burial, with military rites will be in Cupps Chapel Cemetery.Memorial contributions are requested to the American Diabetes Association.Miller, Moster, Robbins Funeral home is in charge of the arrangements and friends may also visit anytime at millermosterrobbins.com.last_img read more

Students advocate for solar panel installation

first_imgStudents marched on Trousdale Parkway Wednesday afternoon to advocate for the installation of solar panels on USC roofs as part of a protest organized by the USC Go Solar Campaign, a branch of the Environmental Core.Connor Mitchell, a freshman majoring in business administration, said the University has a unique opportunity to reduce its carbon footprint of because of Los Angeles’s commonly sunny weather.“USC should adopt solar because we have days like this all year long, and there is this energy out there that can power our planet,” Mitchell said.The protest began at the Annenberg Amphitheater as dozens of students convened to distribute posters emblazoned with slogans like “USC is Bright, Let’s Use the Light” and “Why Aren’t We Using Our Roofs.” Environmental Core co-directors Ethan Bialick and Zach Manta gave brief speeches detailing the group’s efforts to bring solar panels to the University, as well as the goals of the protest.“Today we’re coming here with a proposal that literally says this company will pay USC to put solar on these roofs,” Bialick said. “We’re bringing this to them, and we’re going to protest that they need to do this now [and] they need to make a commitment now.”Demonstrators then marched down Trousdale Parkway, before circling in front of Tommy Trojan. Students, led by Manta, chanted slogans such as “This is the hour for solar power” and “Solar makes sense.” Afterward, students shared their own reasons for why they thought solar power was a top priority for USC.“I support USC switching to solar because, as a world-class University at a time when renewable is readily available, there is no reason why we should be relying on dirty fossil fuels,” said Olivia Pearson, a freshman majoring in environmental engineering.After the protest, the Environmental Core presented administration officials with a proposal from the energy company SolarCity to lease USC’s unused rooftops to install solar panels owned and maintained by the company. The University will only need to host the panels and collect the lease payments from Solar City, which will alleviate the financial burden of the solar panels.“We’ve repeatedly been told by administrators that they’re not willing to put the money down and invest in solar systems because the payback period is too long for their high-risk, high-reward financial strategies,” Manta said. “Although solar does financially make sense, we want to be very clear that this is not primarily a financial decision.”Bialick hopes that the protest will show the University’s administration that installing solar panels is both socially responsible and financially feasible.“Ideally, they would recognize that they have a sustainability plan that says they’ll procure renewable energy when economic, and this [proposal] literally pays them to get renewable energy,” Bialick said. “If they refuse this, they’re essentially breaking from what they said.”last_img read more