Julian Jacobs named a Jerry West award finalist

first_imgJunior shooting guard Julian Jacobs was named to the top ten finalists list for the Jerry West Shooting Guard of the Year Award. The watch list, selected by the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, narrows down the competition for the final award, which will be announced on April 8.Named after Hall of Famer and 1959 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player Jerry West, the award recognizes the top shooting guards in Division I men’s college basketball. This is only the second year that the award has been given out by the Naismith Hall of Fame. Last year, it was given to former Ohio State University guard D’Angelo Russell.Averaging 12.1 points, 5.9 assists and 5.2 rebounds, Jacobs has played an integral part in leading the Trojans to a 17-5 record. This season has been the best start since 1991. Jacobs isn’t just a scoring leader for the USC offense — he’s also an offensive leader throughout the entirety of the Pac-12. He leads the division in assists per game and ranks sixth in steals per game, with an average of 1.5.His dynamic energy on the offense has garnered 22 dunks this season, providing an explosiveness that the Trojans need in order to stay competitive throughout the rest of their season. Jacobs will be key in solidifying an already strong season for the Trojans.This honor ranks Jacobs right alongside national superstars from powerhouse programs, such as Buddy Hield from the University of Oklahoma and Grayson Allen from Duke University. The pair will provide stiff competition. Hield has averaged 26.2 points per game while leading his Oklahoma squad to take the number one spot and put up a staggering 46 points and seven assists in the team’s triple-overtime loss to the University of Kansas. Allen, meanwhile, averages 20.3 points and 3.7 assists despite a disappointing season for the recently unranked Blue Devils.The competition will be narrowed down to five finalists in March before the final announcement at the ESPN College Basketball Awards Show in April. The show is also in its second year and will take place at the Nokia Theater, where the Hall of Fame will also present the Bob Cousy Point Guard of the Year Award, the Julius Erving Small Forward of the Year Award and the Karl Malone Power Forward of the Year Award.last_img read more

Educators come together for annual National Education Association meeting

first_imgEducators from across the nation are currently meeting in Boston for the annual meeting of the National Education Association, the largest teacher’s union in the country.Listen nowAlaska NEA president Tim Parker is attending along with 64 other state members to learn about education initiatives around the country and to discuss how to improve education in Alaska.Parker said that his biggest concern is the uncertain future of the state’s education budget.“We’re going to be in exactly the same spot next year,” Parker said. “Teacher lay-offs and program cuts continue.”Among the topics discussed at the meeting was this year’s roll out of the Every Student Succeeds Act or ESSA. ESSA replaces the No Child Left Behind Act and gives states more power over setting standards for their schools and for evaluating teachers.Parker said he has been speaking with educators from other states about how to improve methods for evaluating student progress.“Some of them are super creative,” Parker said. “They actually have to investigate an oil spill.”The NEA annual meeting ends on July 5.last_img read more

This famous tortoise lived for 100 years His genome may reveal how

first_img Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe This famous tortoise lived for 100 years. His genome may reveal how he did it However, the study offers no insight into why George remained lonesome to the end, unable to father any offspring. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Lonesome George, the Galápagos tortoise who became famous as the sole survivor of his species, may have had a souped-up immune system, top-flight DNA repair, and increased resistance to cancer, according to an analysis of his genome.George, the last member of the tortoise species that formerly lived on the Galápagos island of Pinta, was about 100 when he died in 2012. Researchers have now sequenced his genome and that of a giant tortoise from a different species that inhabits the Aldabra Atoll in the Indian Ocean. The results, reported today in Nature Ecology and Evolution, divulge some clues about why the reptiles can live so long.For one thing, the immune systems of both tortoises appeared to be anything but sluggish. Mammals harbor one copy of a gene that enables immune cells to punch holes in invading or abnormal cells; the two giant tortoises carried 12 copies. George and his giant counterpart also sported a version of a DNA-fixing enzyme that may be more efficient, one of the signs that they are particularly good at mending genome damage. Duplications of two genes that may quell tumor growth, along with other genomic differences from mammals, suggest the tortoises may have evolved stronger defenses against cancer, which older animals are susceptible to. Other turtles share some of these adaptations, but some are unique to the giant species. By Mitch LeslieDec. 3, 2018 , 11:00 AM JAD DAVENPORT/National Geographic Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more