Students to start bike share program

first_imgFive USC students plan to launch the bike-share program, Ryde, on campus this upcoming fall semester.Ryde allows students to use bikes located all over campus. Ryde is controlled by an app where users can pay by use or through subscription. The app allows users to locate bikes near them and also reserve a bike when they are on the way to receive it. The team is also developing a feature that allows the bike to lock itself after use or when left idle.The Ryde team includes Pranav Sudesh, a senior majoring in mechanical engineering; Ashan Marla, a freshman majoring in computer science; Caroline Zhong, a senior majoring in international relations (global business); Jon Koehmstedt, a junior majoring in computer science; and Spencer Pearlman, a freshman majoring in business cinematic arts.The team has received help from Paul Orlando, an adjunct professor who runs the USC Incubator, during their program’s development.According to Sudesh, Ryde will improve student transportation on campus.“You don’t have to worry about owning a bike [or] maintaining it, but it’s always there when you need it,” Sudesh said.Sudesh said bike sharing can help free up space on campus.“Administration is not so pleased with the number of bikes on campus,” Sudesh said. “Bike sharing has a lot more potential than just giving out free bikes, because … it’s pretty easy for people to share 100 bikes.  On the other side, you’re removing 200 bikes from campus, because all of those people, instead of owning their own bike[s] … are sharing a system that declutters the area.”Ryde was a finalist in the USC New Venture Seed Competition and is still waiting to hear back on who won. Ryde also participated in Startup Equinox and and a SparkSC event: Arts, Grooves and Food.Marla said Ryde will begin in fall 2015.“We’re aiming to roll out a soft launch in this coming fall,” Marla said. “We will be somewhere supplying somewhere between 10 to 20 bikes and just seeing whether USC is ready for bike sharing and whether this bike-sharing system that we’ve developed [can] work on campus. We also want to see how students react to it, because at the end of the day, this is for the students.”The bike share program also worked with USG to create a plan to implement the sharing system that targets future freshmen.Marla said USG’s help has been important for program development.“USG has been the leading advocacy for Ryde up until now and we’re here and we’re going to be launching as a result of them supporting us so much,” Marla saidMarla said Ryde could possibly branch to other campuses if the USC system is successful“We’re first trying to see ‘does USC respond well to it’,” Marla said. “We’re trying to really tailor … [this] service to the Trojans [but] later on if it works, awesome, that’s something we can share with a lot more people, but right now our focus is just enhancing and making it optional for a USC student just to hop on a bike.”last_img read more

USC qualifies for championship with late-round push

first_imgThe No. 3 USC men’s golf team, playing without the injured Jamie Lovemark and on the brink of having a promising season end prematurely, shot a final round four-under par 284 to grab the last NCAA national championship qualification spot by one shot over New Mexico. The Trojans were led by freshman Steve Lim, whose last day 66 was deemed “hands down, the best round of the year” by coach Chris Zambri.  Lovemark, a two-time All-American, sustained a muscle tear in his rib section two weeks ago during practice and was clearly not his usual self in the first two rounds of the NCAA West Regional at Lake Merced Golf Course, shooting 76 and 83. He withdrew from the tournament before Saturday’s final round, meaning that all four of USC’s other golfers would have their scores count, severely limiting the Trojans’ room for error. “The safety net [of the fifth player] makes it a lot easier,” sophomore Matt Giles said. “It’s difficult playing with only four guys.”The Trojans got off to a rough start, with senior Tom Glissmeyer six-over par after his first five holes and no other player under par at the time. “Even though I was struggling early on, I knew that I needed to grind it out,” Glissmeyer said. “Every stroke could be the difference and it turned out it was, one stroke.”Glissmeyer settled down and was one-under par on his remaining 12 holes, finishing with a 77. Giles had two birdies in his last five holes to shoot 72, while sophomore Tim Sluiter birdied four of his last seven holes to shoot 69. Lim, the only non All-American regular starter for USC, was the unexpected source of the low round on Saturday, making six birdies and an eagle over his last 13 holes.  “He’s been a great addition to our team all year,” Zambri said. “The only thing he hadn’t been doing was finishing off good rounds that he had started. On Saturday, our assistant coach [Josh] Brewer walked the course with him the whole time and just kind of talked him through every shot because the decision making can be tough when [you’re under pressure].” The decision to have Brewer basically caddy for the freshman proved huge down the stretch when Lim shook off a bogey on an easy 16th hole to finish birdie-birdie and help USC qualify for the NCAA finals to be held at Inverness Country Club in Toledo, Ohio. The focus for the Trojans now turns to fine tuning their games and waiting to see if Lovemark will be healthy enough to play in less than two weeks. Even without Lovemark, the Trojans believe they have as good of a chance as anyone at taking home the national title. “Every guy on our team, of the four that are going for sure, has proven that they can play big time golf on a big stage,” Zambri said.  “Everything else was just preparation,” Glissmeyer added. “I don’t really care if we went the whole season without winning if we get this next one. That’s all that matters.”last_img read more

Carlisle continues to impress coaches

first_imgAmir Carlisle isn’t an ordinary freshman.Through nearly three full weeks of fall camp, the first-year tailback from Sunnyvale, Calif., has continued to impress coaches and teammates alike, namely USC coach Lane Kiffin, who has likened him to a pair of successful freshmen from last season.“[His] maturity, preparation for the game are very similar to the two guys that had the great freshman years in [wide receiver] Robert Woods and [cornerback] Nickell Robey,” Kiffin said. “It’s so rare for a true freshman to make an impact regardless of how physically talented they are unless they are mentally prepared and driven and focused, because there are so many distractions as a freshman.”Standout · Though just a freshman, running back Amir Carlisle has shown in fall camp he is capable of starting the season opener. – Carlo Acenas | Daily TrojanFollowing senior tailback Marc Tyler’s suspension in late July, the Trojans have been without a proven tailback to start the year. Of the team’s four running backs competing to start the Sept. 3 season opener against Minnesota, only sophomore tailback Dillon Baxter appeared in a game for the Trojans in 2010.Carlisle, as a result, remains fortunate to be in such a position.“I just bring energy to it and determination,” Carlisle said. “The other backs are great backs. I’m just going to go out there and give it my all each and every play and leave the rest up to the coaches.”With the opener little more than a week away, Kiffin confirmed that the race to replace Tyler had not been settled.“No, we still haven’t figured it out,” Kiffin said of the competition.Carlisle routinely broke through the line for big plays during snaps against the second team defense, and despite his small stature — 5-foot-10, 180 pounds — Carlisle believes his determination compensates for what he lacks in size.“You know I’m a competitor,” Carlisle said. “I’m going to go out there and give it my all each and every play. I really pride myself on toughness.”Yet Carlisle also admitted he still has plenty to learn.“I try to learn the playbook as best I can. I’m new to it,” Carlisle said. “I have made mistakes, but I make it a point to get extra time in the playbook, really try to learn it.For the first time this camp, Tyler made an appearance in pads at Wednesday’s practice, largely playing with the scout team, but Kiffin downplayed the event.“It’s the next step in the process of [Tyler] hopefully coming back,” Kiffin said. “This isn’t a major step; he’s not cleared for the second game. It’s just something that we had in place as he goes through this process.”Though the Trojans gained one player in Tyler on Wednesday, they lost others.Kiffin announced that freshman fullback Charles Burks was injured earlier this week and will require knee surgery, forcing him to miss the entire season. Other injuries, however, were not as serious.Junior guard Abe Markowitz left practice with a foot injury and was replaced by freshman Marcus Martin.“Marcus has a great future here,” Kiffin said. “I think he’s a very talented athlete who really loves football.”The team’s oldest eligible tailback, Curtis McNeal also sat out during Wednesday’s practice, complicating some of the team’s position battles.During special teams drills, the punt return squad appeared confident in a variety of drills early, often pressuring freshman punter Kyle Albarado.In the field goal and extra point drills, junior safety T.J. McDonald also blocked two attempts, while the kicking team converted the rest.last_img read more