Brain tests at age of 3 can predict child’s future success

first_imgDaily Mail 13 December 2016Family First Comment: Based on the Dunedin longitudinal study, but here’s a key point…In the at-risk group, “77 per cent of children brought up without fathers”This is what our recent report on child abuse and also our report on child abuse highlighted! A simple test at the age of three can predict if children will grow up to be a burden on society, scientists claim.A study has found roughly a fifth of the population are responsible for 81 per cent of criminal convictions, 77 per cent of children brought up without fathers, two-thirds of benefits claimed and more than half of nights spent in hospital.This small group of people drain the public purse, but researchers at King’s College London say their troubled lives could be forecast from early childhood.It takes just 45 minutes to give three-year-olds a battery of tests, on their language abilities, motor skills, frustration and impulsivity.Decades after taking the test, children who scored low were far more likely to fall within the most burdensome group.They were also more likely to smoke, be obese and take prescription drugs.The findings, while controversial for indicating that someone’s life path is set in their early years, suggests reaching these at-risk children young could turn things around.READ MORE: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4026274/Brain-tests-age-THREE-predict-child-s-future-Scientists-say-scores-reveal-kids-burden-society.htmllast_img read more

Bulldogs MS Golfers Victorious At North Branch 3-Way Meet

first_imgIn a three-way meet with North Decatur and St. Louis, the Batesville Middle School Golfers came out victorious at North Branch Golf Course.In a close team battle the Bulldogs earned the top spot with a team score of 215. North Decatur followed closely with a 221, and St. Louis was only ten strokes back with a 225.Andy Gutzwiller and Meredith McCreary helped lead the Bulldogs to victory once again with the team’s #1 and #2 each shooting 51’s. Kelly Gole had a great outing with a 54, and Zach Stoneburner rounded out the top four scores with a 59. Shane Meer brought in a respectable 60 to help the Bulldogs improve to a team record of 16 – 3.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Chase Mears,last_img read more

Leafs bounce back to take the Steam out of Summerland

first_imgOne day after blowing a two-goal lead in a demoralizing loss to Murdoch Division rival Beaver Valley Nitehawks, the Nelson Leafs rebounded to double the Summerland Steam 4-2 in Kootenay International Junior Hockey League action Sunday afternoon at the NDCC Arena.Team captain Rayce Miller, who was very critical of his team following Saturday’s meltdown, provided the heroics for the Green and White by scoring the winning goal with seven minutes remaining in the game.The win allowed Nelson to nail down two of three wins during a three-game home stand. Summerland took a 1-0 lead after one period when Riley Pettitt scored 12 minutes into the frame.Nelson took a 2-1 lead after 40 minutes on goals by Nolan Percival, his first of the season, and Nicholas Ketola.Summerland tied the game two minutes into the third before Miller combined with Tyler Garcia and Levi Hulston to beat Matthew Huber in the Steam nets for the game-winning goal.Eamonn Miller scored into the empty net to secure the home-ice win for the Leafs.Patrick Ostermann was solid between the pipes to register the win in goal for Nelson.The Leafs, 6-5 on the season, now face Castlegar Rebels Wednesday in the Sunflower City.LEAF NOTES: Nolan Percival’s strong play earned the Nelson Minor Hockey grad the Leafs game star honour. Riley Pettitt was the game star for Summerland. . . . Nick Novin and Tyler Garcia each finished the game with two assists. . . . For the second time in two games, Nelson was out shot 33-29 by Summerland, including a 15-6 margin in the third period.last_img read more

GAA SFC QUARTER FINAL: MICHAELS BRUSH ASIDE MALIN TO BOOK SEMI-FINAL SPOT

first_imgThe men from St Michael’s have booked their championship semi-final berth with ease after easily overcoming the men from Malin at O’Donnell Park this afternoon.Colm McFaddenIn the end, the Creeslough side had a whopping 16 points to spare over an Inishowen outfit who were never really allowed to get into the game which finished on a scoreline of 3-15 to 1-05.Early goals by Andrew Kelly and Ciaran Gallgher had finished this game as a contest long before referee Seamus McGonagle blew even the half-time whistle. Many sensed that Malin might put it up to Michaels after dumping Gaoth Dobhair out of the competition but on the day they were no match for their opponents.Kelly, who was voted man of the match, also grabbed St Michaels third goal in the 55th minute from the penalty spot when Daniel McLaughlin was pulled down as he was going through on goal.Scores from no less than eleven different St Michaels’ men showed the authority which they stamped on this game.Many of the Creeslough team’s bigger players such as Martin McElhinney, Colm McFadden and Christy Toye all stood up to the plate to do their bit. As well s McFadden and Toye, others including Liam Paul Ferry, Michael Langan, Michael Cannon, Lee Carr and even the evergreen Brian McLaughlin got on the scoresheet.Paul McLaughlin scored a late gol for Malin but it was merely a consolation score in name and nature.There was no question it was Michaels day but it was just a question of by what margin.Declan Bonner, brought in to assist the St Michaels club in their surge for championship glory, knows it won’t be as easy the next day out.GAA SFC QUARTER FINAL: MICHAELS BRUSH ASIDE MALIN TO BOOK SEMI-FINAL SPOT was last modified: September 13th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:CreesloughMalinSt Michaelslast_img read more

Employment equity body named

first_img28 July 2005Labour Minister Membathisi Mdladlana has expressed confidence at the establishment of a second Commission for Employment Equity.He said that the appointment of the commission, to be chaired by Jimmy Manyi, would add impetus to the quest of achieving equality in the country’s workplaces.The commission’s members are Marlene Bossett and Lebogang Montjane from business, Tefo Raditapole and Neva Makgetla from organised labour, Mzolisi kaToni and Khulu Mbongo from the community sector, and Alfred Tau representing the state.Like the first commission – appointed in 1999 under the leadership of Mapule Ramashala – the second commission is mandated to advise the minister on codes of good practice, regulations, policy and other matters concerning the Employment Equity Act.Mdladlana said the establishment of the commission came at a time when compliance with the law was moving too slowly, with recent statistics indicating that blacks, African women and disabled people were still discriminated against in relation to appointments to influential positions.“The new commission will develop, adopt and implement strategies that vigorously respond to the very slow pace at which we are reaching the overall objectives of the Act,” Mdladlana said.He said his department was balancing enforcement of employment equity compliance with strengthening collaboration with social partners, as well as aligning employment equity with broad-based black economic empowerment, skills development and preferential procurement.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

State corn grower leaders to Trump: Uphold commitment to farmers and RFS

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest State leaders of corn grower organizations in 23 states sent a letter to President Trump, calling on him to follow the law and keep the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) whole. The letter to the President comes on the heels of the Trump Administration’s most recent approval of 31 new RFS waivers to big oil companies. The 85 total waivers approved under the Trump Administration amount to 4.04 billion gallons, resulting in reduced corn demand due to lower ethanol blending and consumption and a rising number of ethanol producers slowing or idling production.The state corn grower leaders urge the President to stop the harm caused by waivers and restore integrity to the RFS by directing the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to account for projected waivers beginning with the pending 2020 RFS volume rule.The full text of the letter is below.Dear President Trump,We are writing on behalf of the more than 300,000 corn farmers across the country who are being negatively impacted by a perfect storm of challenges in rural America. The 31 new Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) waivers to big oil companies, recently approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and bringing total waivers issued under your Administration to 85, could not have come at a worse time for agriculture.Ethanol plants in several states, including Iowa, Ohio, Wisconsin, Michigan, Indiana, Minnesota and Mississippi have closed or idled. These closures have cost 2,700 rural jobs and impacted demand for more than 300 million bushels of corn. Corn farmers are beginning harvest and continuing to lose markets to deliver their corn. Frustration in the countryside is growing.Corn farmers are not asking for a special deal. We are simply asking, as we have been for the past two years, that your EPA uphold the law.To effectively stop the harm caused by RFS waivers, EPA needs to account for projected waivers beginning with the pending 2020 RFS volume rule. Accounting for waivers in the annual RFS volume process restores integrity to the RFS. It also allows your Administration to continue granting waivers, as allowed by the law, while keeping the RFS whole.While adding gallons and improving market access for higher blends of ethanol are all policies farmers appreciate and support, future waivers will continue to minimize the RFS, unless your Administration acts to account for waivers beginning this coming year first.We were pleased to see press reports indicating that, following a meeting with farm-state lawmakers, an agreement had been reached to address the harm caused by waivers. With more than 4 billion gallons waived out of the RFS, we appreciate you listening to our elected representatives about what is needed to restore meaning to the RFS. Farmers across the country are anxiously awaiting the release of more details about this agreement. Ethanol plants will continue to close if you don’t act soon, creating a rippling effect throughout the rural economy.Corn farmers are appreciative of your past support for agriculture and ethanol. We especially appreciate your efforts to remove the barrier to year-round sales of E15, but EPA’s current use of waivers undermines growth potential for higher blends of ethanol, reduces demand, lowers the value of our crop, and puts the outlook for the rural economy in jeopardy.Mr. President, we firmly ask that you uphold your commitment to America’s farmers and the RFS.last_img read more

Safe Bulkers Pounces on Capesize amid Attractive Prices

first_imgzoomIllustration. Image Courtesy: Pixabay under CC0 Creative Commons license Monaco-based dry bulk shipping company Safe Bulkers has availed of attractive prices to expand its fleet with a Japanese-built Capesize vessel.The 181,000 dwt bulker was built in 2009 and its purchase was financed from cash on hand, the company said.The identity of the seller and the name of the vessel have not been revealed.Safe Bulkers said that the ship will be employed in the time charter market following a dry docking of the ship.As of August 13, 2018, the weighted time charter average of the Baltic Exchange Cape Index was USD 26,059 per day.“While we remain focused on the optimization of our capital structure by buying back later this month a Kamsarmax class vessel under sale and lease back agreement, our board has decided to invest opportunistically in a second-hand Capesize class vessel, the second acquisition since December 2017, which we believe will be accretive to our revenues and further expand our fleet and our operations in the Capesize market,” Loukas Barmparis, president of the company, said.Safe Bulkers’ operational fleet comprises around 40 drybulk vessels with an average age of 7.9 years.last_img read more

George Stephanopoulos And Ali Wentworth Honored At GLSEN Respect Awards – New

first_imgGLSEN, the leading national education organization focused on ensuring safe and affirming schools for all students, honored George Stephanopoulos and Ali Wentworth, Ilene Chaiken, Optimedia, Amber Schweitzer and the Academy for Young Writers Gender-Sexuality Alliance (GSA) at the 13th Annual GLSEN Respect Awards – New York on Monday, May 23 at Cipriani 42nd Street.Ali Wentworth and George Stephanopoulos arrive at the GLSEN Respect AwardsCredit/Copyright: Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for GLSEN Respect AwardsThe 2016 GLSEN Respect Awards – New York continues through June 2 with an online auction via Charitybuzz that features items such as tickets to a Rangers game in the Fox Networks’ Madison Level Suite in Madison Square Garden; tickets to Kinky Boots on Broadway, plus a backstage tour and gift bag; and VIP tickets to the Good Morning America 2016 Summer Concert Series in Central Park.Stephanopoulos and Wentworth were recognized for their dedication to improving the lives of young people and creating opportunities for marginalized communities. Accepting the award, Stephanopoulos said, “The great privilege we have to work at an organization like ABC News is that we have the chance to shine a light on issues where others might not go, to help bring people out of the shadows, to tell stories of people who are living their lives with courage and grace and grit in the face of incomprehension, in the face of hostility, in the face of a world which either doesn’t know how or doesn’t want to understand.”Ilene Chaiken, who was honored for providing LGBT young people with role models and increasing visibility through positive media representations of LGBT people in her work, said, “It’s disheartening that, even as we’ve made huge strides forward in the struggle for equality, our young people continue to face homophobic harassment, bullying and discrimination – not only at the hands of other students, but from teachers and parents and administrators. It’s enraging that we are again battling back ignorant efforts to enshrine new laws designed to deprive us of our human dignity. It’s disgusting – just disgusting – that our national politics is so rife with racist, misogynist, xenophobic, homophobic, reactionary and violent rhetoric. Our children deserve better. We all deserve better. That’s why we’re here tonight, standing with GLSEN.”The program also featured GLSEN National Student Council members from Michigan, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio and Texas, who shared their own stories of why GLSEN’s work is important and how it has helped each of them in creating more positive school climates in their own communities.Other speakers included GLSEN Executive Director Eliza Byard; Empire star Jussie Smollett; Dave Ehlers, President of Optimedia; Tim Jones, CEO – Publicis Media, The Americas; Educator of the Year and Colorado teacher Amber Schweitzer; model Andreja Pejić; Michelle Eisenberg, Spencer Washington, Daniel Collado, Dio Ayala and Dasia Flemming from the Academy for Young Writers GSA – the GSA of the Year; television anchors Brooke Baldwin, Robin Roberts and Thomas Roberts; Catherine Lhamon, Assistant Secretary, Office of Civil Rights, the U.S. Department of Education; Jordan Krantz, Abbie Faxon and Allie Faxon from Franklin County High School GSA; Del Ray Zimmerman, co-chair of GLSEN Middle Tennessee; Chief Control Officer of First Data Cindy Armine-Klein; and NYC Department of Education LGBTQ Liaison Jared Fox.The GLSEN Respect Awards, introduced in 2004 and held annually in Los Angeles and New York, showcase the work of students, educators, individuals and corporations who serve as exemplary role models and have made a significant impact on the lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth.The 2016 GLSEN Respect Awards – New York was co-chaired by Cindy Armine-Klein, Chely Blitzer-Wright, Barbara Frankel, Michel Mercure and Ryan Pedlow. Sponsors included Presenting Sponsors Optimedia, Target, The Walt Disney Company and Wells Fargo, as well as Senior Sponsors First Data and JPMorgan Chase & Co.GLSEN has led the way on LGBT issues in K-12 education since 1990. Through ground-breaking original research, innovative program development, student leadership and educator training, community organizing, and targeted state and federal advocacy, GLSEN has seen the impact of its work through the development of educational resources, direct engagement of youth and educators, and national programs like GLSEN’s Day of Silence, GLSEN’s No Name-Calling Week, GLSEN’s Ally Week.last_img read more

A WEINSTEININSPIRED HORROR MOVIE SET IN TORONTO TIFF IS WILLING TO TALK

first_imgAdvertisement Login/Register With: Director Brian De Palma, a regular at Toronto International Film Festival, photographed here in 2007 (CARLOS OSORIO / TORONTO STAR FILE PHOTO) Advertisement Advertisement Is Brian De Palma really going to make a Harvey Weinstein-inspired horror movie and set it at the Toronto International Film Festival? If so, it could help serve as a reminder of the need to fight sexual harassment and to empower women, says TIFF artistic director Cameron Bailey.“It reminds us of just the real importance and the urgency of making a change in the film industry when it comes to gender parity,” Bailey told the Star.Online reports this week, drawing from interviews De Palma is doing while on a European book tour, say the writer/director plans to make a horror film called Predator in Toronto based on the alleged sex crimes of disgraced producer Weinstein. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

THOR LOVE AND THUNDER DIRECTOR TAIKA WAITITI MEETS WITH RYAN GOSLING

first_imgActor Ryan Gosling prior to a news conference at the Toronto International Film Festival on Sept. 11, 2018. – Andrew Francis Wallace , Toronto Star LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement RYAN GOSLING MEETS UP WITH ‘THOR 4’ DIRECTOR TAIKA WAITITI FOR LUNCH IN LARyan Gosling may have an exciting project in the works!The 38-year-old actor was spotted meeting up with Thor 4 director Taika Waititi on Friday afternoon (August 16) in Los Angeles. READ MORETHOR: LOVE AND THUNDER DIRECTOR TAIKA WAITITI MEETS WITH RYAN GOSLINGAfter making multiple cult-classic films as well as a fan-favorite entry in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, many movie fans are eager to follow the career of director Taika Waititi. With his new satire Jojo Rabbit set to premiere later this year, followed by the new project Next Goal Wins, he will finally turn his attention to Thor: Love and Thunder, which could be a bold new chapter in the MCU. READ MORE  Twitter Advertisementcenter_img RYAN GOSLING AND ‘THOR 4’ DIRECTOR TAIKA WAITITI SPOTTED HAVING LUNCH TOGETHER IN L.A.Ryan Gosling might be headed into the Marvel Universe. The Oscar-nominated actor, 38, was spotted eating lunch with “Thor 4” director Taika Waititi on Friday in Los Angeles.While the meaning of their meeting is unknown, many are speculating that Gosling will join Waititi and Chris Hemsworth (Thor) in the upcoming fourth installment of the franchise. READ MORE Advertisement Facebook Login/Register With:last_img read more

While memory serves

first_imgIf I remember correctly, it was Thursday, March 25, 1971. My M.A (History) final exam was round the corner. We in India then had the audible, omnipresent, omniscient and ubiquitous “All India Radio” but no electronic visuals. Hence hearing the evening radio “news” and reading morning newspaper was my childhood “addiction”, exam or no exam. My father – an extraordinary scholar of income tax law, English, Bengali & Sanskrit languages, with expertise in Mathematics, Astrology and Economics, and a senior civil servant of the government of India, was born in, and hailed from, 2 Toynbee Circular Road, Tikatuli, Dhaka (then India, in 1917) and was not the type to disturb his son for radio “news” in the exam season. That day, I too, seem to have something else in mind for emperor Ashoka and Buddhism as a possible question for my paper. Also Read – A special kind of bondNevertheless, there suddenly came a stentorian voice from our C-II 17 Wellesley Road, New Delhi-110003 “radio room”. “Come immediately” was the two-word command. Usually serene, serious yet ever-smiling, he suddenly lit upon hearing the All India Radio news that the charismatic Bengali leader, widely respected and revered as “Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rehman” had given a clarion call to the people of (then) East Pakistan, firing the first salvo at the West Pakistani Punjabi-speaking military junta, from Dhaka’s Ramna Maidan: “Aamago share shaat koti zanagan re tomra dabayya raakhte parbaanaa” (You oppressive rulers, you will never be able to suppress us seven and half crore Bangali people). We instantly felt the electrifying effect and potential tremor, almost after 24 years of the Partition days, in the “radio room” of the Hindu Bengali refugee in Lutyen’s zone of New Delhi. Also Read – Insider threat managementThereafter, things moved at high speed. Owing to his professionalism, probity and spotless past, my father was one of the two Bengali speaking senior civil servants whose residence was identified by the Government of India as an “informal meeting point”, should the need arise in future. My M.A exam ended on Saturday, May 15, 1971, and results were out on Monday, July 05, 1971. I was happy with my result, but was happier owing to the fast unfolding scenario of possible emancipation of an enlightened and inherently simple Bengali-speaking people in a geography which is so dear to our heart, mind and thought owing to shared history, culture, language and tradition. Soon, however, came Wednesday, August 18, 1971, the ‘appointed date’ of an “informal meeting”, closely coordinated by Shri Ashok Ray, then Joint Secretary of Ministry of External Affairs, and other organisations of the state. Commencing at 5:30 pm. and ending around midnight, it was a gala party; a reunion of sorts, high on emotions, love, tears of joy, passion, fraternity, feasting. A gathering of 150 people of whom at least 80 were from the land of Bangabandhu, including the first Prime Minister of Bangladesh Tajuddin Ahmed. The best (and most surprising) part of the gathering emerged from the fact that despite Ahmad being eight years younger to my father, they knew each other very well. It was an incredibly sensational scene. Also, half of the guests had escaped, God only knew how from the army junta’s clutches; and at least two families had driven down in their “Made in Japan” Nissan and Toyota cars which were a rare commodity in India of 1971. Some of us were mighty impressed. As we were then used to Ambassador of Calcutta; Fiat of Bombay; Standard Herald of Madras; watch of HMT; steel of Tata; and shoes from Bata. All “Made in India”. Indigenous. Not imported. The outcome of the meeting was essentially a commitment to do everything necessary. The government and the people of India were one with the Bengalis under Bangabandhu. All present in the meeting had the same goal, in different ways, irrespective of their nationality and ethnicity. I vividly recall the spontaneous, repeated and vociferous slogan “Joy Bangla”, reverberating through the hot, humid night of that 1971 “August day”. Two more meetings subsequently took place in two different places in Delhi, which I could not attend owing to my preparation for competitive examinations. As things were heating up, I travelled to spend the winter with my maternal aunts in Asansol and Calcutta. My stay in Asansol lasted five days as war broke out on Friday, December 03, 1971. I took a train the next day, December 4, for Calcutta. The three-hour journey was an experience by itself as the train moved with all “lights off” in the “chair car”. Howrah station was pitch dark but packed with passengers, police, and personnel of railways. Home guards were extra vigilant, navigating all and sundry, and the half an hour road to Alipore residence of aunt turned out like a two-hour air journey from Delhi to Kolkata, as I reached at 11 pm. The following day dawned with my frantic attempt to catch up with Major General Bishwa Nath Sirkar (whom I had known before) in Fort William, Headquarters of the Eastern Army Command. Major General Sirkar, a Second World War veteran, saw action on several fronts, was an armoured corps officer par excellence (belonging to Central India Horse). Being strict disciplinarian, with frugal habits and exemplary probity, he never sought publicity and was never flashy. The Major General was handpicked overnight (rather plucked) by Army Chief Sam Manekshaw and transferred from the post of Military Secretary (in Army Headquarters, New Delhi) to a newly created post in the Eastern Command Calcutta, exclusively for cooperation with the Mukti Bahini. Consequently, whereas world today knows who did what in 1971, hardly anyone can either remember or recall his invaluable contribution in the liberation movement of Bengalis in the east and role played in actual combat of the 14-day war. After the 1971 war, Sirkar became Lieutenant General but resigned after a serious difference of opinion with then Defence Minister of India. He had several years of service left at the time of his premature departure. I remain eternally grateful to that great soldier and noble soul for helping me to “see the front” for two days after Sunday, December 12, 1971, when the writings were already on the wall. After a resounding firing to deter me from “seeing is believing”, the gentleman in the General relented and “put me on” to II Corps operating from Krishnanagar. The rest, as they say, is history. At the age of 23 years, I had a remarkable, unforgettable side view of the moving procession of history, resulting in the crumbling of old (dis)order and the birth of a new nation, not in the distant horizon but in our vicinity. Between 1947 and 1971 came alive two nations: the first under bondage, second as an uncaged bird with the unrestricted horizon of thought and action as its domain. (The writer is an alumnus of National Defence College and author of ‘China in India’. The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

Welcome To The 2018 World Series Where Even SalevsKershaw Turns Into A

BOSTON — Tuesday night was billed as one of the greatest pitching matchups in World Series history: Clayton Kershaw versus Chris Sale — two of the elite starters of their generation. On a cool night in Boston, a sold-out Fenway Park was well-aware of the pedigree of its foe and greeted the Los Angeles Dodgers ace with chants of “Ker-Shaaawww, Ker-Shaaawww,” drawing out the last syllable of his surname as he pitched. But the lyrical taunting was short-lived as Kershaw didn’t make it far into Game 1 — and neither did Sale, for that matter.We didn’t get a classic pitching duel. Instead, we received a heavy dose of 2018 baseball. And that style of play — namely bullpenning — favored the Red Sox en route to an 8-4, series-opening victory.Six Red Sox relievers combined to allow just one run over five innings, and Boston pinch-hitter Eduardo Nunez broke the game open with a three-run homer off Dodger reliever Alex Wood in the seventh inning.That both of the starting pitchers lasted only four innings is telling of how quickly the game is changing. Tuesday marked just the fourth Game 1 — the game that often features a pair of aces — in World Series history in which neither starting pitcher recorded an out in the fifth inning. In the three previous occasions — in 1923, 1966 and 2004 — all but one of the starters allowed as many or more runs as Sale or Kershaw did in fewer innings prior to departing.1And that other starter — Baltimore’s Dave McNally in 1966 — had walked the bases loaded in the third inning before getting the hook. In other words, those starters had been battered. That wasn’t the case Tuesday. Instead, Dodgers manager Dave Roberts and Red Sox manager Alex Cora had their aces on short leashes.Teams have become aware of how performance typically declines the deeper a starter pitches into a game, and teams are also eager to try to gain righty/lefty platoon advantages when they can find them in the later innings. Teams also monitor fatigue, and Sale was somewhat taxed in throwing 91 pitches.During the 232-minute game Tuesday, the two clubs combined to use 12 pitchers, who threw a total of 308 pitches. Through Tuesday, relievers have accounted for 50.5 percent of innings this postseason, which would be a record. That mark is up 4 percentage points from last postseason (46.5 percent) and significantly from the 2010 playoffs (32.3 percent). While bullpens have taken on more and more work in the regular season, their usage and importance in the postseason is reaching unprecedented levels.Dodger infielder Brian Dozier said “anything goes” in the World Series. But the urgent, anything-goes practices employed Tuesday were carryovers from the regular season. In fact, the Dodgers have already faced the most extreme form of pitching game strategy this postseason.While some traditionalists have bemoaned the move toward bullpens, Red Sox reliever and Game 1 winner Matt Barnes told FiveThirtyEight in a cramped postgame clubhouse that he is all for this style of play.“I’m about whatever it takes to get wins in the World Series,” Barnes said. “How you do it? It doesn’t matter to me. You just have to win 11 games before anyone else does.”Cora began the Red Sox parade of relievers in the top of the fifth when he summoned Barnes out of the right-field bullpen to replace Sale, who had walked the lead-off batter, Dozier. Barnes, who has become a trusted setup man, allowed a single to Justin Turner, and Dozier later scored on a Manny Machado groundout to tie the score at 3.Kershaw entered the game with questions about his postseason performances and left with a career ERA of 4.28 in 145 postseason innings. He also continues to suffer from declining fastball velocity, as the pitch sat between 90 and 91 mph Tuesday. He relied heavily on his breaking pitches. Only CC Sabathia owns a worse ERA among pitchers who have made at least 15 postseason starts. While Kershaw was hit hard at times on Tuesday — including a 105.9 mph single and a 109.1 mph double off the bat of J.D. Martinez — he wasn’t helped by his surrounding cast, either. L.A.’s starting first baseman, David Freese, failed to catch a foul pop-up in the first inning. It wasn’t ruled an error but was a play that could have been made — and it might have cost the Dodgers two runs.Kershaw allowed three runs through four innings. After walking Mookie Betts and allowing a single to Andrew Benintendi to begin the fifth, he was was pulled from the game. Roberts called on Ryan Madson, who allowed both inherited runners to score to give the Red Sox a 5-3 lead.More innings pitched by relievers requires lineups to remain flexible as offenses try to counter the platoon advantage gained by switching the handedness of pitchers. For instance, the Brewers had left-handed starter Wade Miley throw just five pitches in a start in Game 5 of the National League Championship Series before going to a right-handed-heavy cast of relievers against the platoon-heavy Dodgers. And on Tuesday, five of the six relievers that followed the lefty Sale were right-handed.In response to pitching strategies, Dozier joked Monday that the Dodgers have begun to pull hockey-style line changes in games. Los Angeles was the first club in World Series history to start nine right-handed batters with no switch-hitters. But by the seventh inning Tuesday, three L.A. lefties and a switch-hitter had joined the game, and only three Dodgers were playing positions they had occupied on the starting lineup card: Turner (third base), Machado (shortstop) and Yasiel Puig (right field).While the two managers traded chess pieces, it was Cora who seemed to win the most strategic battles, as he has done all October. He struck a decisive blow on Tuesday by pinch-hitting Nunez for left-handed hitter Rafael Devers when Roberts called the left-handed Wood into the game in the seventh.“Cora is prepared,” Barnes said. “Tonight is another example, pinch-hitting (Nunez). It’s a lot of fun playing for him. He knows exactly what he’s doing.”The Red Sox have won 116 games under Cora this season, a year in which the game seems to be changing so quickly. They are now three wins from a fourth championship this century.Check out our latest MLB predictions. read more

Catching up with Ohio State sports played over spring break

OSU junior pitcher Tanner Tully (16) during OSU’s 12-1 win over Hofstra on March 18 at Bill Davis Stadium. Credit: Giustino Bovenzi | Lantern reporterStudents and faculty might be just getting back in the swing of things after being relieved of their responsibilities from March 11 to Monday for spring break, but many Ohio State athletics teams did not enjoy that same luxury.Things were business as usual for these squads, with some even using the time off from classes to pick up the pace of schedule.While details about how the OSU wrestling and women’s basketball teams fared in their NCAA tournament action over the weekend can be found elsewhere in the section, here is a rundown of how six other Buckeye units fared.BaseballOSU baseball played seven games over a nine-game stretch, starting with a four-game series in Las Vegas against University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The Buckeyes split those four games, including a win in the final one before getting on the plane back to Columbus for their first home series.That series came against Hofstra, a team that came into the weekend just 5-11. That number became even worse, as OSU took care of business against the Pride with a three-game sweep.OSU allowed just four runs over the three games. The Friday home opener was marked by a 12-run offensive explosion, but things cooled down from there. The Buckeyes needed a late rally in Game 2 to grab a 4-2 win, while senior lefty John Havird tossed seven strong innings in the final game to lift the home team to a 2-1 victory and sweep.Now 11-6-1 on the year, eight of OSU’s next nine games are set to come at its home field at Bill Davis Stadium.Men’s basketballThe NCAA tournament might have been devoid of scarlet and gray this year, but that does not mean OSU didn’t have any postseason action after its quarterfinal exit from the Big Ten tournament.OSU players during a game against Penn State in the Big Ten tournament on March 10 in Indianapolis. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead | Photo EditorCoach Thad Matta and the Buckeyes accepted a bid into the National Invitational Tournament, where they were a No. 3 seed.Their first draw came at the Schottenstein Center against Mid-American Conference runner-up Akron. In a tight game that featured 10 ties and 23 lead changes, it was fitting that regulation ended with the teams tied at 62.The overtime period was all OSU, however, as the Buckeyes outscored the Zips 10-1 in the final five minutes to take a 72-63 win and earn a second-round meeting with Florida.The matchup against the Gators proved to be a sloppy contest, with OSU shooting just 39 percent. Junior forward Marc Loving and freshman guard JaQuan Lyle combined for 39 of OSU’s 66 points, but it was not enough to top the Gators, who won 74-66, ending OSU’s tumultuous season.Men’s ice hockeyIt was Big Ten tournament time in St. Paul, Minnesota, over spring break, and the OSU men’s hockey team had as much momentum as anyone, coming in unbeaten in seven straight contests.That momentum certainly carried over to the Buckeyes’ first-round matchup with Michigan State. A third-period goal by OSU sophomore forward Matthew Weis knotted the game up at 3, which it remained until overtime.In that extra session, it was freshman forward Mason Jobst collecting a rebound and firing it into the net to keep OSU’s season alive for at least one more night.But it did prove to just be one more night, as the Buckeyes were unable to hold onto a 1-0 third-period lead over top-seeded Minnesota. The Golden Gophers came alive in the final period, getting four pucks past OSU junior goalie Christian Frey. The Buckeyes tacked on a goal late, but it was not nearly enough to avoid the 4-2 season-ending defeat to the eventual Big Ten runner-ups.OSU junior midfielder Johnny Pearson (30) during a game on March 19 in Denver. Credit: Courtesy of OSUMen’s lacrosse After a promising 5-1 start, the then-No. 20 men’s lacrosse team faced a big test over spring break, as it had three ranked opponents on the schedule. The Buckeyes, who could have asserted themselves nationally with a strong showing, instead stumbled, losing all three of those games. They opened with an 8-5 loss on the road to then-No. 14 Hofstra before coming back to Columbus, where OSU fell to then-No. 10 Towson in overtime on March 15, 10-9. At that point, the most difficult matchup still awaited the Buckeyes. OSU headed west to take on the defending national champions and top-ranked Denver. The Scarlet and Gray trailed by just one goal early on in the second half, but the Pioneers pulled away to win 15-6. OSU, however, is set to get another chance to right the ship against a premier opponent on Saturday. The Buckeyes are scheduled to take on No. 2 Notre Dame at 1 p.m. inside Ohio Stadium. Softball The softball team had a successful trip to Southern California, winning four of the five games it played in San Diego, headlined by a win over then-No. 24 Fresno State. The 9-6 victory was OSU’s second over a top 25 team this season. Fueled by a quick start, OSU (14-7) took down San Diego State 4-3 on Wednesday before playing four games in the San Diego State Tournament. The Buckeyes dropped their opener against Long Beach State 5-3 after surrendering three runs to the 49ers in the bottom of the sixth inning. OSU bounced back, however, defeating San Jose State 8-3 on Friday.The crown jewel of the trip was the Buckeyes’ victory over Fresno State. OSU rallied to tie the game in the fifth inning before sealing the deal in the sixth with three more runs. OSU finished the trip off on the right note Sunday afternoon against Cal Poly. After falling behind 2-0, the Buckeyes rattled off seven unanswered runs en route to victory. In the most recent polls, OSU was unranked but it received a few votes. But following their showing in Southern California, the Buckeyes now might break into the top 25. Women’s lacrosseOf all the teams mentioned, it is hard to argue that any is playing better than the OSU women’s lacrosse team. The No. 17 Buckeyes finished off a perfect five-game homestand with three victories over the week and a half of spring break.OSU freshman attacker Avery Murphy (27) during a game against Cincinnati on March 11 at Ohio Stadium. Credit: Courtesy of OSUThe three wins were marked by stellar defense, as OSU gave up just 17 goals in the three games.Senior midfielder Cian Dabrowski was the standout during the stretch for the Scarlet and Gray, scoring eight goals over the three contests. Senior goalie Katie Frederick came up big defensively, stopping 17 shots overall.The wins were by scores of 11-5 over Cincinnati, 10-8 over Virginia Tech and 10-4 over Canisius.Now with a three-game road trip ahead of it, OSU will look to keep its home success going elsewhere. read more

Ohio States Braxton Miller named 2011 National Freshman Performer of the Year

Ohio State freshman quarterback Braxton Miller was chosen Friday as the 2011 National Freshman Performer of the Year. The College Football Performance Awards organization selects its honorees based on the player’s improvement to the overall effectiveness of his team. During the 2011 season, Miller, who was not made available for comment, threw for 1,159 yards and completed 54.1 percent of his passes. Thirteen passes led to touchdowns, a freshman school record. Miller closed his first 10 games as a starter for OSU with season-high records against Michigan and Florida despite losses in both games. He threw for 235 yards at Michigan Stadium and earned a 78.3 completion percentage in the Taxslayer.com Gator Bowl. He also led the team in rushing with 715 yards and seven touchdowns on the ground. He averaged 4.5 yards per carry on the season. Miller claimed team-best statistics when he ran for over 100 yards three times against Penn State, Indiana and Michigan. He also broke the record for the longest scoring run by a quarterback with 82 yards. Miller averaged 59.6 rushing yards and 96.6 passing yards per game. The award comes in the form of a crystal trophy that stands 22 inches tall and includes an eight-inch crystal football on top. Previous National Freshman Performer of the Year award winners include South Carolina’s Marcus Lattimore in 2010 and Oregon’s LaMichael James in 2009. The Huber Heights, Ohio, native has been honored more than once for his efforts in the 2011 season. In December, Miller was awarded OSU football’s Archie Griffin outstanding offensive player award and voted the team’s most outstanding first-year offensive player by OSU coaches. The Big Ten Conference announced in late November that Miller would be the recipient of the 2011 Thompson-Randle El Freshman of the Year award as well. Miller, a communication major, tweeted a simple “Thank u !!” early Saturday morning. read more

Football Ohio State lands commitment of 2019 fourstar running back Steele Chambers

Ohio State added another running back to its 2019 class.Four-star running back Steele Chambers committed to the Buckeyes, announcing it via Twitter Wednesday night.The 6-foot-2, 215-pound recruit played both running back and outside linebacker at Blessed Trinity Catholic High School in Rosewell, Georgia. Ranked as the 340th-best recruit in the nation, according to the 247 composite rankings. He is also listed as the No. 29 athlete and No. 37 recruit in the state of Georgia.Chambers is the sixth member of Ohio State’s 2019 class and is one of four in the class not from Ohio. The Georgia native will join four-star running back Sampson James in the class. read more

Undetected water main break floods businesses in Moreno

first_img Posted: December 7, 2018 December 7, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI)- The break in the eight inch water main was discovered this morning but it may have happened earlier and gone undetected due to the flooding from rainfall yesterday. Four businesses were flooded along Naples Place. Undetected water main break floods businesses in Moreno KUSI Newsroom last_img read more

Governor Dunleavy Recognizes Patriot Day

first_imgGovernor Dunleavy ended the message with proclaiming September 11, as Patriot Day in Alaska, and encouraged all Alaskans to take this day as one of service and compassion as we remember the events of that fateful day. “We will forever remember and honor the nearly 3,000 innocent Americans who lost their lives on that day, and remember their families, friends, and loved ones who continue to carry the memories of their lives forward. We recognize and honor the heroism of the first responders – the firefighters, police, emergency personnel, health care providers, and citizens who came to the aid of others during, and immediately following the attacks, some of whom laid down their lives while helping to evacuate and rescue others. He issued a video statement on Wednesday addressing the state of Alaska:“On September 11, 2001, the American people endured the worst terrorist attack on United States soil in the nation’s history, with courage and heroism. While the attacks were meant to divide our great nation, we responded by standing together in a remarkable display of the spirit of unity, resolve, and compassion for one another that represented the best of the American spirit. “On this day and every day, we as Americans reflect on the importance of freedom, liberty, patriotism, and love of our country, and are grateful for the privileges and rights that we hold as Americans. Let us honor and reflect on those we have lost, and stand firm in our resolve to defend and preserve our great nation and the freedom, which has made us so, and recommit to live in a spirit of unity and compassion that binds us together as Americans.”center_img Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Governor Mike Dunleavy has proclaimed today, September 11, as “Patriot Day” and has ordered all state and U.S. flags to fly at half-staff to honor victims and their families, first responders, caregivers, and service men and women. Flags are to return to full staff by sunrise on September 12.last_img read more

Bangladesh needs 12b fix fashion giants in rights drive

first_imgFive years ago this week, just after thousands of garment workers had settled in behind their sewing machines, a poorly built eight-story Bangladeshi factory complex called Rana Plaza buckled and collapsed. More than 1,130 people, mostly young women, died; 2,500 were injured, reports Reuters.In the years since the worst disaster ever in the apparel industry, Bangladesh has become a laboratory for testing factory safety. Western brands and retailers that source low-priced clothing in Bangladesh have inspected 2,300 active factories and pressured suppliers to make real improvements. Dozens of shoddily built facilities have closed altogether.But the Bangladesh experiment has been only partially successful. The European and American companies limited their reach and left thousands of factories untouched. The Bangladeshi government, meanwhile, has demonstrated little willingness to change its lackadaisical attitude toward regulation. Millions of garment workers remain at risk, especially those working for subcontractors-small second- and third-tier factories often completely unknown to Western brands.The turmoil in the wake of Rana Plaza constituted a public relations crisis for Western brands and retailers. Some 250 companies have formed a pair of initiatives: the European-dominated Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh, whose leadership includes trade unions, and the American-led Alliance for Bangladesh Worker Safety. These groups inspect factories, oversee remediation of safety problems, and collectively cut off any suppliers that fail to comply.Within their self-assigned jurisdictions – defined as the body of factories with which their members directly do business – the Accord and the Alliance have performed impressively. The Accord reports that 85 per cent of the hazards its inspectors identified have been fixed. These include blocked exits, inadequate sprinkler systems, faulty electrical wiring, and unstable support pillars. The Alliance reports an 88 per cent remediation rate.Catastrophic accidents have declined in Bangladesh. In 2013, there were 17 accidents, including Rana Plaza, that resulted in five or more deaths and/or 10 injured workers. Each year from 2014 through 2017, this number has hovered between two and five such accidents, according to data analysis contained in a new report by the NYU Stern Center for Business and Human Rights.But the mission of making factories safe in Bangladesh isn’t even close to done. The Accord and Alliance will not continue indefinitely. The Alliance plans to wrap up its work by the end of 2018. The Accord will renew its mandate every six months, but only through mid-2021. At some point, the factories that the two initiatives have overseen will return to the supervision of the Bangladeshi government, which is notorious for having ignored death traps like Rana Plaza and Tazreen Fashions, where a November 2012 fire killed 112.Subcontractors present a big challenge. These smaller shops help “mother” factories handle sudden volume increases and changed orders. No one has an exact count of subcontractors, most of which operate with little or no regulation. While the NYU Stern Center estimates that there may be as many as 3,000 of these factories, the government denies a subcontracting system even exists.But on a recent fact-finding trip, researchers from the NYU Stern Center visited two subcontracting factories of 150 and 200 workers each. They weren’t hard to find. At one, the owner told of receiving a list of fire-safety mandates from a government inspector. The owner said he’d lost the list and, in any event, didn’t have the money to install sprinklers or a fire alarm. He didn’t seem in the least concerned.It’s vital that the Bangladeshi government recognises the presence of garment subcontractors – as well as its larger long-term duty to regulate the industry with vigour. In the short term, though, those with an interest in the country’s apparel business ought to band together and finance a task force devoted to finishing the work the Accord and Alliance have begun.A “shared responsibility” task force could seek to address human rights challenges by means of the collective action of major stakeholders. Variations on the model have been used for years by international organizations that convene donor conferences to respond to refugee crises. In the supply-chain context, the goal ought to be protecting workers and spreading the benefits of globalisation more evenly.The task force should be Bangladeshi-led and include Western brands and retailers that have profited from selling Bangladeshi-made clothes. Western governments also need to step up, recognizing that their citizens benefit from the opportunity to buy these clothes at low prices. Traditional international funding agencies like the World Bank also ought to do much more to protect the workers in this sector. There is a role for private philanthropies, too.A rough estimate of how much such a task force should seek to raise is $1.2 billion. This represents an approximation of the number of factories that haven’t been renovated multiplied by $250,000 – a ballpark figure for an average remediation.Whatever budget the task force sets for itself, the amount should be understood as paying for the attainment of safety today. Once current gaps have been addressed, responsibility ought to shift to the government of Bangladesh. The fifth anniversary of Rana Plaza calls for a renewed and collective commitment to a safe and secure garment industry.According to British charity War on Want, garments exports account for 80 per cent of Bangladesh’s total export revenue, reports AFP.But even today, garments workers’ rights remain far from guaranteed, with many working 14 to 16 hour days at some of Bangladesh’s 4,500 factories, the organisation says.- ‘Never again’? -As Western consumers grow more socially and environmentally conscious, the fashion houses that have long relied on factories like those in the Rana Plaza have battled to redeem themselves.Primark, for one, says it “continues to support those who were affected and … has contributed a total of over $14 million in aid and compensation”.It also says it launched a programme of building inspections “to assess its suppliers’ factories against international standards” six weeks after the building collapse, and that it “remains committed” to improving the Bangladeshi garment industry as a whole.Swedish retail giant H&M, which says it never used the Rana Plaza factories to produce garments, is nonetheless committed to ensuring greater “social and environmental progress” in Bangladesh.On 19 April, H&M said in a statement that 450,000 textile workers at 227 factories in Bangladesh that produce garments for its stores worldwide “are now represented by democratically elected representatives”.The role of these representatives is to “speak on behalf of the workers when discussions are held about for example working hours, working conditions, health and security issues”, the statement said.- ‘Appalling’ conditions -More broadly, the International Labour Organisation launched a programme following the disaster, to “enhance safety in factories so that the country should never again experience a tragedy like the Rana Plaza collapse”.The ILO programme includes training for local producers in chemical safety, inspection of over 1,500 factories for building and fire safety, labour inspection, and an improved culture of safety in the workplace.Celine Choain, a garment industry specialist at the Paris-based Kea Partners consultancy, said that while there has definitely been progress, much remains to be done.”The incident definitely acted as a catalyst for brands” to put in place changes in the way they produce their garments, Choain told AFP.She noted that two thirds of the 1,700 Bangladeshi factories inspected following an ILO-sponsored safety agreement successfully corrected 75 per cent of the breaches that were identified.However, wages remain dismally low, according to War on Want, which last week described working conditions for the vast majority of Bangladesh’s garment factory workers as “appalling”.Many garment workers earn little more than the minimum wage of 5,300 taka ($65, 53 euros) per month.last_img read more

One year on Rohingya facing an uncertain fate

first_imgRohingya refugees make their way to a refugee camp after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border in Palong Khali, near Cox`s Bazar.File photo ReutersDoctors without Borders (MSF) in a statement on Friday said the denial of Rohingya’s legal status, coupled with unacceptable living conditions in haphazard makeshift camps, continues to trap refugees in a cycle of suffering and poor health.While Bangladesh showed extraordinary generosity by opening its doors to the refugees, 12 months on, the Rohingya’s fate remains very uncertain, said MSF, a Paris-based international humanitarian non-government organisation.“It is unacceptable that watery diarrhoea remains one of the biggest health issues we see in the camps,” says Pavlo Kolovos, MSF head of mission in Bangladesh.Host states in the region deny them any formal legal status, despite the fact that they are refugees and have been made stateless by Myanmar.Many of the refugees that MSF teams speak to are very anxious about the future.”I’ve lost my strength, my ability to work. I always have so many worries, worries about the future,” says Abu Ahmad, a Rohingya father of eight. “I think about food, clothes, peace and our suffering… If I stay in this place for 10 years … or even for one month, I will have to suffer this pain.”On 25 August 2017, the Myanmar Army launched renewed ‘clearance operations’ against the Rohingya people causing widespread violence and destruction, and forcing more than 706,000 to flee into neighbouring Bangladesh.They joined over 200,000 others that had fled to Bangladesh after previous waves of violence, bringing the total number of Rohingya hosted in Cox’s Bazar district to over 919,000.In the 12 months since, MSF has provided over 656,200 consultations, equivalent to more than two-thirds of Rohingya refugees, in 19 health facilities or mobile clinics.At first, more than half of MSF’s patients were treated for violence-related injuries, but other health concerns soon emerged that were linked to the overcrowded and unhygienic conditions in the camps. “The infrastructure to meet even the most basic needs of the population is still not in place, and that seriously affects people’s wellbeing.”  Donors and governments with influence over the Government of Myanmar have failed to show the necessary leadership by not pressuring it to end persecution against the Rohingya, which is the cause of their displacement.The UN-led humanitarian response in Bangladesh is, to date, only 31.7 per cent funded. The health care funding stands at a mere 16.9 per cent, leaving significant gaps in the provision of vital medical services.The Rohingya have long been excluded from healthcare in Myanmar, meaning they have very low immunisation coverage. Preventative health measures are therefore crucial. Vaccination campaigns, supported by MSF, have been instrumental in preventing outbreaks of cholera and measles, and in containing the spread of diphtheria.Under the pretext that the Rohingya will soon be returning to Myanmar, the humanitarian response has been hampered by restrictions placed on the provision of long term or substantial aid.The conditions endured by the Rohingya in the haphazard, makeshift camps fall far short of accepted international humanitarian standards, with the refugees still living in the same temporary plastic and bamboo shelters that were built when they first arrived.“In an area where cyclones and monsoons are common, there are almost no stable structures for Rohingya refugees, which has a tangible impact on their security and dignity,” says Kolovos.One refugee that MSF spoke to described how vulnerable his family felt in the camp: “When it rains we sit together, all our family members, [holding the house down] so the house won’t blow away. At night it is very dark here, we have no lights.”Considering the level of violence that the Rohingya faced in Myanmar and the trauma this will have caused, services to treat mental health issues and sexual and gender-based violence injuries remain inadequate.They are also complicated by the lack of legal status, which prevents people from reasonable access to justice and the rule of law.The Rohingya remain forcibly confined to the camps, and most of the refugee population in the camps has poor access to clean water, latrines, education, job opportunities and healthcare.“These restrictions not only limit the quality and scale of aid, but also force the Rohingya to depend entirely on humanitarian aid. It deprives them of any chance to build a dignified future for themselves and makes every day an unnecessary struggle for survival,” says Kolovos.More durable solutions must be found to respond to what is likely to be a protracted period of displacement.“The reality is that hundreds of thousands of Rohingya have been displaced in Bangladesh and elsewhere for decades, and it may be decades until they can safely return to Myanmar, if ever. The scale and scope of the Rohingya’s suffering merits a much more robust response – locally, regionally and globally,” says Kolovos.“Pressure must meanwhile continue to be exerted on the Myanmar government to halt its campaign against the Rohingya.”last_img

Full Show The Generation Gap in Technology And The Good The Bad

first_img 00:00 /50:43 X Listen On Friday’s Houston Matters: We talk with a journalist in Southeast Asia who’s been following the case of William Nguyen, a Houston man who was detained in Vietnam last month and convicted and deported. Nguyen now is on his way to the U.S.A. Lawmakers are praising the outcome.Then, technology develops at a rapid pace these days. For digital natives like Millennials and Generation Z, these advancements might feel somewhat routine… but what about those older generations who didn’t grow up with all this advanced technology? We find out how much of a disadvantage being computer literate is these days and how are schools integrating technology and making it accessible to both students and teachers.Also this hour: When faced with intriguing developments in the week’s news, we turn to a rotating panel of “non-experts” to parse The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly of it all.Then, News 88.7 catches up with Tour de France cyclist Lawson Craddock, a Houston cyclist who gained attention after he crashed during the first stage of the famed cycling race, and wound up badly injured. Craddock tells us what happened next and who he’s donating money to for each stage of the Tour de France he completes. WATCH: Today’s Houston Matters 360-Degree Facebook Live Video.We also offer a free daily, downloadable podcast here, on iTunes, Stitcher and various other podcasting apps. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:  This article is part of the Houston Matters podcast Sharelast_img read more

University Plagued By Racial Issues to Host Event at Black Museum

first_imgWhen American University (AU) revealed the venue for its Annual Founder’s Day Ball, students at the predominately White institution in Washington, D.C., had mixed reactions. The dance party is scheduled at the National Museum of African American History & Culture on the evening of Mar. 3.Founder’s Day Ball is an annual party that celebrates the founding of AU. The Student Government takes the lead on hosting the dance party every year. Both the president and vice president of Student Government for this year are African Americans.The National Museum of African American History & Culture, which was recently featured on a stamp, will host an American University party. The school has had a number of troubling racial incidents. (Courtesy photo)In recent years, the event has been held at museums such as the Newseum, the National Portrait Gallery and National Air and Space Museum. But this year’s venue has faced some criticism from both faculty and students alike.Merdie Nzanga, a former African American AU student who now attends Howard University, told the AFRO she had “mixed feelings.”“I think it could be an opportunity for the African American community to really educate people,” Nzanga said, “while at the same time I see a bunch of spoiled, rich racist White liberal AU kids not really understanding the meaning of Emmett Till’s casket.”Nzanga acknowledges the different sides of the situation.“On one side, I think it’s bad because … I don’t really think people understand or take African American history and culture seriously at AU due to the racial tension, and the other part of me … I genuinely think it could be an opportunity for people to learn from their ignorance,” Nzanga told the AFRO.AU has had a number of racial-bias incidents on its campus. In May 2017, multiple bananas were hung from nooses on the first day the first African American woman took office as Student Government President. In September 2017, 10 Confederate flag fliers were found across AU with cotton stuck to them.For these reasons, Nzanga said having “closeted racists” at the museum is not appropriate. “I don’t appreciate people using [the museum] solely for entertainment… having these kids there is really not appropriate.”Nzanga added it would be a different scenario if an HBCU had its parties at the museums. “Because … African Americans at HBUC’s understand the history of our culture.”But Tamara Young, an African American student at AU, didn’t expect the negative reaction from people when the venue was announced.“I love the location…It’s a really hard museum to get into, and so it’s the opportunity for people who haven’t been to the museum to visit,” Young told the AFRO.  “The museum has events all the time so I didn’t really see an issue about the location.”Young added that even if some students at AU don’t respect the culture, their attendance to the dance couldn’t be regulated. “It’s a slippery slope, and it’s [kind of] hard to navigate that,” Young said.Like Nzanga, Young said she hopes it’ll be an educational experience for some people who are not aware about Black culture.Thery Sanon, an African American student at AU, shares Young’s sentiments on the location for the dance.“I feel like we’re spending too much time worrying about our white peers being problematic and forgetting the fact that we are still going to have fun,” Sanon told the {AFRO} in a statement.Sanon added that he knows students from all races who don’t feel comfortable going to the dance because of the venue, fearing something will go wrong. “Everyone [who’s] going knows that this is a possibility, but this should not detract from how lit this year’s Founders is going to be,” Sanon said.last_img read more

Player Spotlight on Blaire Bass

first_img The University of Louisville Softball Player Spotlight series features short interviews with each of the Cardinals’ players. Episode 16 features senior Blaire Bass. Episode 16: Blaire BassThe Bass FileNumber: 3Full name: Blaire Elisabeth BassNickname: BeezyPosition: OFBats/Throws: R/RHometown:  New Roads, La.High School: Catholic High School of Pointe CoupeeTravel Team: Birmingham ThunderboltsMajor: CommunicationsFun Fact: Her left pupil is always bigger than her right.   Print Friendly Version Story Linkslast_img read more

Eat up Dilli style

first_imgThe festival will be inaugurated by D.M Spolia, Chief Secretary, Govt. of NCT of Delhi on 23 December.This festival will offer culinary delights of Purani Dilli. The festival was started in the year 2010 and, since then Delhi Tourism organises Dilli Ke Pakwaan every year. The event has been receiving encouraging response from Delhiites and foreign tourists alike. The festival will have vendors from Purani Dilli who will showcase their expertise in grafting some of the most delectable, mouth watering cuisines. Visitors will be able to savor the Mutton Korma, Chicken Tikka, Kabab, Special Chaat, Hot Jalebi, Ice Candy, various flavors of kulfi, Daulat ki chaat, puri aloo chaat, rabri falooda, firni and many more. There will be more than 150 varieties of food on offer for the visitors. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The entrance gates of the Dilli ke Pakwaan venue will be designed in the shape of a samosa and malai tikka. There will be theme corners where visitors will be able to enjoy the taste and also get a vivid glimpse of its culture and tradition.Renowned chefs will be giving interactive sessions on cooking besides various competitions for the visitors, such as best recipe and best food lover will also be held during the seven day event.Another addition to this year’s Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixDilli Ke Pakwaan Festival is that a special kid’s zone will be designed for the children. Various competitions will also be held for children in that zone.To embark the history of Delhi the entire venue will be redefined with the Old Delhi charm. Cultural performances will bring Dilli Ke Pakwaan alive along with appetizing regional food and street food.Delhi food has always been an amalgamation brought in by people who have migrated to the city and settled. The original food of Delhi mainly refers to the days of Shahjahanabad. This festival is the celebration of this social and cultural diversity.Dilli Ke Pakwaan Festival is one event that is a testimony that despite modernity and the thriving fast food culture, traditional street food is still the flavor any day.last_img read more