India bans 118 Chinese apps in new backlash over border dispute

first_imgIn June, 20 Indian soldiers were killed in hand-to-hand combat in the Ladakh region. An Indian special forces member was killed in one of two incidents at the weekend.China has also suffered casualties in the high-altitude battle at more than 4,200 meters but has not given figures.India had already banned 59 Chinese apps — including the video-sharing platform TikTok — after the June battle. Another 47 were added in July.The PUBG mobile app has millions of young users in India. The company said it had been made aware of the government action but had no comment. PUBG was developed by a South Korean company, but the mobile version that has taken off around the world was developed by Tencent. India on Wednesday banned 118 more Chinese apps as the backlash intensified against Beijing over an increasingly bitter border showdown between the giant neighbors.The government said the apps — including the popular video game PUBG and other services provided by Chinese internet giant Tencent — promoted activities “prejudicial to sovereignty and integrity of India, defense of India, security of state and public order”.India and China, which fought a border war in 1962, have been embroiled in a series of deadly clashes and showdowns on their disputed Himalayan frontier in recent weeks. Chinese selfies banned Other apps targeted by India include games, online payment services, dating sites and even software to edit selfies.The IT ministry accused the apps of stealing user data and moving it abroad.The “mining and profiling by elements hostile to national security and defense of India, which ultimately impinges upon the sovereignty and integrity of India, is a matter of very deep and immediate concern which requires emergency measures”, it said.India has increasingly used economic weapons against its neighbor in the dispute.On top of banning the apps, India has frozen Chinese companies out of contracts including for its 5G mobile phone infrastructure and blocked Chinese goods at ports and customs posts.India has warned that relations risk permanent damage unless China pulls its troops back to positions they held before May.Tensions at the border are now at some of the highest levels since the 1962 war.Both sides have sent tens of thousands of troops to the region with India dispatching more since the weekend, according to sources in Ladakh.Indian and Chinese military officers held a third day of emergency talks at the border Wednesday but no progress in easing tensions has been reported.India accused Chinese forces of seeking to take more territory at the weekend, but its troops, including special forces, seized a number of hills that dominate a strategic valley.China reacted with anger again Wednesday.”Since the start of this year, India has repeatedly violated bilateral agreements and important consensus” on the frontier, foreign ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying said in Beijing.”It has tried to unilaterally change the status quo by force, undermined the peace and stability of the border area, and caused tension in the border area. The responsibility is undoubtedly solely on the Indian side.” Topics :last_img read more

Arthur Johnson, 87, Oxford: Feb. 4, 1929 – June 25, 2016

first_imgArthur JohnsonArthur M. Johnson, 87, of Oxford died Saturday, June 25, 2016 at the Kansas Veterans Home in Winfield.Funeral Services will be held at 10 a.m., Wednesday, June 29, 2016 at the Oxford Christian Church. Visitation will be held on June 28, 2016 from 12 until 8 p.m., with the family receiving friends from 5 to 7 p.m. at Oxford Funeral Service Chapel. Memorials have been established with the Kansas Veterans Home and Oxford Church of Christ and may be left with Oxford Funeral Service. Burial will be at the Oxford Cemetery. Arrangements are with Oxford Funeral Service. For further information please visit www.oxfordfuneralservice.com.Arthur Milton Johnson was born on February 4, 1929, the son of John and Ruth (Putnam) Johnson in Spencer, NE. He was known to his family and friends as Art or Johnny. He graduated from Spencer Nebraska High School in 1946 and joined the U.S. Air Force in 1948 and was a training mechanics instructor. Following service he worked briefly for O’Neill Outlaw Grocery and then for H.C. Leach Oil Field Construction. He worked on in-flight refueling and rebuilding helicopters during the Vietnam War.Art was also a defense contractor administrator as the regional manager of DCA’s quality assurance completing 33 years of civil service. On March 3, 1951 Art was united in marriage to Margaret Leach. They lived in Electra, TX, O’Neill, NE, Holliday, TX, and Amarillo before moving to Oxford, KS in 1973. Art was a member of the Oxford Church of Christ.Art is survived by his three children: Larry Johnson and his wife Linda of Winfield, Gary Johnson and his wife Susan of Oxford, and Susan Spoon and her husband Robert of Oxford; grandchildren: Jonathan Johnson and his wife Abby of  Dexter, Daniel Spoon and his wife Stephanie of Oxford, Kaly Spoon of Oxford, Seth Johnson of Derby, Aaron Johnson and his wife Eden of Clearwater, Kaydee Johnson and Laura Riggs of Winfield, and Zac Johnson of Oxford, Jessica Lucas of Lawrence, Nick Lucas of Wellington, and Mary Lucas of Winfield; great grandchildren: Keaton and Charlee Johnson, Grayson Drake, Kase and Kale Johnson, Reignor Abasolo, Mary Tyler, Corbin and Carson Lucas; two sisters: Helen and Duane Bolliger and Caroline Rossi and one brother, Leo Johnson.He is preceded in death by his parents, his loving wife, Margaret, two brothers: Carlton “Buck” Johnson and Kenny Johnson, and 3 sisters: Evelyn Liable, Nancy Gamble and Opal “Soapy” Miller.last_img read more