QPR v WBA: Zamora starts with Austin

first_imgQPR, who have Charlie Austin back after suspension, start with Bobby Zamora up front alongside their top scorer.Karl Henry plays and Jordon Mutch drops to the bench. Steven Caulker is also back in the starting line-up and Nedum Onuoha moves to right-back in place of Mauricio Isla, who has returned to his native Chile to attend the birth of his child.West Brom are without Jonas Olsson, Georgios Samaras, Chris Brunt and Victor Anichebe, who are all injured. QPR: Green, Onuoha, Dunne, Caulker, Yun, Vargas, Henry, Barton, Fer, Austin, Zamora.Subs: McCarthy, Ferdinand, Hill, Phillips. Mutch, Kranjcar, Hoilett. West Brom: Foster, Wisdom, Lescott, McAuley, Pocognoli, Gardner, Dorrans, Morrison, Varela, Sessegnon, Ideye.Subs: Myhill, Baird, Dawson, Gamboa, Yacob, Mulumbu, Berahino.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Human Evolution Falsified

first_imgThe title of this entry comes from the data, not from the claims being made about it.  The cover story in Cell1 this week has set off a flurry of startling headlines: EurekAlert pronounces, “Evidence that human brain evolution was a special event” and “University of Chicago researchers discovered that humans are a ‘privileged’ evolutionary lineage.”    The gist of the research by Dorus et al. from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and University of Chicago is that there is a huge genetic gap between human brains and those of our nearest alleged ancestors.  EurekAlert explains:One of the study’s major surprises is the relatively large number of genes that have contributed to human brain evolution.  “For a long time, people have debated about the genetic underpinning of human brain evolution,” said [Bruce] Lahn [HHMI}.  “Is it a few mutations in a few genes, a lot of mutations in a few genes, or a lot of mutations in a lot of genes?  The answer appears to be a lot of mutations in a lot of genes.  We’ve done a rough calculation that the evolution of the human brain probably involves hundreds if not thousands of mutations in perhaps hundreds or thousands of genes — and even that is a conservative estimate.”    It is nothing short of spectacular that so many mutations in so many genes were acquired during the mere 20-25 million years of time in the evolutionary lineage leading to humans, according to Lahn.  This means that selection has worked “extra-hard” during human evolution to create the powerful brain that exists in humans.1Dorus et al., “Accelerated Evolution of Nervous System Genes in the Origin of Homo sapiens,” Cell Volume 119, Issue 7, 29 December 2004, Pages 1027-1040, doi:10.1016/j.cell.2004.11.040.We are glad to be able to announce the downfall of Saddam Darwin to end this eventful year, 2004.  Now there are just a few Darwin Party insurgents to mop up, and the public will be free of this deadly totalitarian regime.  (Would that it were so easy; it would be like Bush’s premature victory speech.)    The science outlets are spinning this story without letting go of Darwinism.  They are throwing around phrases like strong selection, intensified selection and other nonsense as if random mutations conspired to sculpt the most complex piece of matter in the known universe.  They know better.  Orthogenesis (straight-line evolution) is out.  Teleology is out.  Personifying natural selection is out, so all they have to work with are thousands of random, undirected changes over thousands of different genes that have no ability to conspire with one another.  (In fact, they counteract one another; see 11/29/2004 and 10/19/2004 headlines).  But if even one beneficial mutation is hard to find (see 03/19/2002 headline), how is any rational person to believe that thousands – “and that is a conservative estimate” – accomplished such a feat?  The gig is up, Darwin Party: surrender.  It’s over.  Throw down your arms.    The award for Stupid Evolution Quote of the Week goes to Bruce Lahn for his one-liner that “selection has worked ‘extra-hard’ during human evolution to create the powerful brain that exists in humans.”  This can serve as USO entertainment for the liberation troops as they begin their clean-up operations.(Visited 27 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Portal to boost African music

first_imgNigerian hip hop artists, Yung L, Olamide, Ice Prince and Phyno, may be big in their home country but are little known outside of it. Music In Africa looks to change that, providing African musicians a platform to access network with artists around the world. (Image: Chocolate City Group) • Karoo music lends weight to TV series • South African jazz greats shine at London festival • Home-grown death metal helps ease Angolans’ pain • Music van de Caab keeps Khoi and San music alive • Voodoo funk: Ambassador of Afrobeat Shamin ChibbaMuch of the popular music coming out of Europe and the US today can trace its roots back to Africa, yet music from the continent is little known. Artists rarely find recognition beyond their own countries.But with the launch of Music In Africa, an online portal serving the continent’s music industry, African music may just get the international exposure it deserves.The South African editor of Music In Africa, David Durbach, explains that the resource is an information and exchange portal for the continent’s music sector, with a focus on education and networking among industry professionals. “We are trying to empower people working in the music industry by empowering the industry itself and by creating opportunities for the musicians. We are helping them expand their markets and their audiences not just in their own country but on the continent.”The Music In Africa Foundation is an NGO recently established with the support of the Goethe-Institute and Siemens Stiftung, two German cultural organisations with a large presence on the continent. “The plan is that these two institutes can give us a push start to becoming an independent organisation,” says Durbach. Born out of a needThough launched in July this year, the project took three years to come into existence. It was established out of a need to improve communication and reliable information between the various music industries in Africa. Because of lacks in these areas, Durbach says, African artists typically have to “crack it in Europe or the US before they [could] expand their market to the rest of Africa”.Such examples are the Ghanaian Afro-pop group, Osibisa, and South Africa’s Ladysmith Black Mambazo, both of which became popular overseas before they became widely known in Africa. “There is a huge need for networking opportunities in the industry, not just between musicians but anyone working in the industry, from producers to songwriters.“People in South Africa know very little about what is going on in Zimbabwe let alone Nigeria and East Africa. Yet there is a growing amount of interest. So there is no reason why people working in the music industry should not see themselves as part of a larger pan-African industry.”Those artists who go to the US and Europe struggle to keep in touch with their fans back home, he adds. “This is another way to bridge these two international and national markets.” Open to everyoneThe networking is not only restricted to those living in Africa; rather, it is open to the African diaspora. It is not limited by genre either. “We are not trying to discriminate. We are not saying to a rock musician in Bloemfontein or to someone making African music in New York, ‘You don’t belong on this website’. [It is for everybody who is] involved in African music in any kind of way. We try to be as inclusive as possible.”And Music In Africa is also a perfect tool for those international musicians looking to expand their reach into Africa, Durbach adds. Musicians are finding it more difficult to sell records nowadays and to make a living, they have to perform live. Africa presents local and international musicians with a lot of opportunities to make money at concerts and corporate events.With the internet, musicians are able to take more control over their careers without having to rely heavily on labels. Music In Africa therefore presents to these musicians a unique online portal to promote themselves and even link with promoters and operators for free, explains Durbach. Finding artistsMusic In Africa’s intention is to promote artists from all over Africa. It employs five full-time regional editors – based in Kinshasa, Lagos, Dakar, Nairobi and Johannesburg – whose mission is to find and chronicle music from their areas. These editors also commission articles from contributors.The website includes a directory, a magazine, news articles, updated artist biographies and educational resources. Durbach says the music education portal, which was set up in collaboration the Global Music Academy, will have multimedia tutorials on how to play instruments, music production, royalty collection and copyright law in various countries.The overview texts feature static content on specific aspects of the music industry in a particular country, such as the history of hip hop in Senegal or jazz in South Africa. “They are not written in a way that is opinionated. They are objective, Wikipedia-style entries that are simply written. Whether or not English or French is [the reader’s] first language, they will understand the content.” The futureThe organisation is already widening its reach. On 21 November, it staged launch events at the Salon International de la Musique Africaine in Dakar, Senegal and in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.Next year, Durbach says, Music In Africa will host more events such as workshops and competitions. And after all the countries of sub-Saharan Africa have been covered, it will look to break into North Africa, a region it has not covered yet.“It is a massive task and we are taking it step by step,” Durbach says of the organisation’s attempts at gathering as much information on African music as there is. “The continent is blessed with a lot of musical diversity and talented musicians and it is something that needs to be offered to the world. Music is something that we share.”last_img read more

Two criminals shot dead in U.P. encounter

first_imgTwo notorious criminals were killed in an encounter with police in New Mandi area here on Tuesday, an official said.They were involved in several cases of loot and murder. Rohit alias Sandu and Rakesh were carrying cash rewards of ₹one lakh and ₹50,000 on their heads, respectively, ADG Prashant Kumar said. During the encounter, two policemen also sustained injuries, he said. Police have seized two pistols, cartridges and a motorcycle, Mr. Kumar added.last_img

Fathers Encouraged to Attend Information Fairs

first_img The Commission will be engaging fathers at these workshops. Story Highlights Two information fairs under the theme, ‘Surviving the Transition to Secondary School’, will be held The workshop is also geared towards enhancing the relationship between fathers and their children Parents, especially fathers, whose children will be attending secondary schools in the new academic year, are being encouraged to attend the Education Ministry’s parent information fairs.The fairs are being organised by the Ministry of Education through the National Parenting Support Commission (NPSC).Two information fairs under the theme, ‘Surviving the Transition to Secondary School’, will be held on Saturday, August 24, at Port Antonio High School in Portland and on Tuesday, August 27, at the St. Hilda’s High School in St. Ann. The fairs will commence at 12:00 noon daily. The first fair took place on Sunday, August 11 at Jamaica College, in Kingston.The NPSC will be providing several workshops at the fairs with the topics: ‘Managing a Successful Transition’;  ‘Teaching Your Children to Cope while Sustaining the Relationship’; ‘Fathers Matter’; ‘Engaging your Children’; and ‘Helping Teenagers to Adjust’.Speaking at a Jamaica Information Service (JIS) ‘Think Tank’ on August 14 at the agency’s head office on Half-Way Tree Road, Executive Director of the NPSC, Dr. Patrece Charles Freeman, said the Commission will be engaging fathers at these workshops.“We think it is very important to reach out to fathers. We have had one workshop at a high school and you had 60 parents and they were all mothers, no fathers,” she said.Dr. Charles Freeman said that at the workshop dubbed, ‘Fathers Matter’, fathers will understand their role and impact on their children’s lives. She said the workshop is also geared towards enhancing the relationship between fathers and their children.“Fathers will also learn effective fathering strategies for building healthy families and to be able to engage their children and their needs, both at home and at school,” she added.The NPSC, which operates through the Education System Transformation Programme (ESTP), has a mandate to co-ordinate activities relating to parenting and parenting support.Its main objective is to implement the National Parenting Policy of Jamaica that gives support to parental organisations, by teaching them about the laws of the Child Protection Act, and ensuring that children are protected and not neglected.last_img read more