Governor Tom Wolf on Substance Use Disorder and Criminal Justice

first_img October 19, 2016 Substance Use Disorder,  The Blog,  Videos Addiction too often is an invisible problem. People with substance use disorders and their families fear the stigma of addiction, which keeps them isolated and unwilling to ask for help.The consequences fall to law enforcement, jails and prisons, and understaffed treatment centers.But we can’t arrest our way out of the opioid epidemic. It’s time to recognize that opioid addiction is a disease, not a crime.Visit on.pa.gov/opioids to learn more about how the Wolf Administration is working to provide real solutions to save lives and help addicted individuals and their families get the treatment they need to live long, productive lives. Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Governor Tom Wolf on Substance Use Disorder and Criminal Justice SHARE Email Facebook Twitter By: The Office of Governor Tom Wolf   SHARE  TWEETlast_img read more

Kenya launches mobile application to monitor forests to curb illegal logging

first_imgKenya launches mobile application to monitor forests to curb illegal loggingKenya on Friday launched a mobile application to monitor forests in order to curb illegal logging.Kenya Forest Service (KFS) Director Emilio Mugo said the smart phone application will enable users to report illegal activities in the forest.“We expect the app to compliment the efforts of law enforcement officers to conserve Kenya’s forests,” Mugo said during the 20-year celebrations of the Kenya Forest Working Group (KFWG).The mobile system is a joint initiative of the KFWG and the University of Nairobi.Mugo said the app will reduce the cost of forest surveillance.“Kenya’s forests are spread across the country and we don’t have sufficient resources to monitor activities in all forests at real time,” he said.According to government data, forest covers seven percent of Kenya’s land mass. The director noted that Kenya has 142,000 hectares of plantation forest to supply wood to the timber industry.“We don’t allow logging in indigenous forest as they are used for conservation of watersheds and for use as wildlife habitats,” he said.KFS said the country has sufficient supply of wood to satisfy domestic requirements although Kenya imports small amounts from Tanzania, South Sudan and UgandaNational Coordinator of the KFWG Jackson Bambo said Kenya’s forests are under threat from human encroachment.“Expanding population has forced some communities to clear forests for agriculture activity,” Bambo said.He added that the mobile app will enable communities to report on forests activities to a centralized server.“The technology system is expected to enhance forests monitoring and reporting by various stakeholders for informed decision making,” he said.The system users are only required to have a smart phone to report any incidence in real time.The coordinator said the app will help to educate the millions of Kenyans who have smart phones but have little information on forests conservation.last_img read more

Dilbert Barrett

first_imgDilbert Barrett, 89, of Versailles passed away at 2:20pm, Saturday, February 17, 2018 at his home. He was born at Booneville in Owsley County, Kentucky on January 31, 1929 the son of Levi and Dora Baker Barrett. He was married to Martha Feller on September 3, 1949 and his wife of 68 years survives. Other survivors include one son Timothy (Candy) Barrett of Versailles; one daughter Marlene Smith of Westport; 7 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren; one brother James (BJ) Barrett of Booneville, Kentucky; one sister Louise Rice of Beattyville, Kentucky. He was preceded in death by his parents, his daughter Elaine Farrell, and his brothers Lee, Earl, Johnny, and Robert Barrett. Mr. Barrett retired in 1988 from Schenleys’ at Lawrenceburg where he worked as a blender for 31 years. Earlier in his career Dib worked at a veneer mill in Lawrenceburg, worked on the railroad, and also at Fisher Body. At home he was a farmer, raising tobacco, keeping bees, and producing a prize winning garden from seeds he’d saved the previous season. Retirement years also found him at McDonald’s in Versailles where he participated in the morning and afternoon “coffee clubs.” Dib was baptized at the Bear Creek Baptist Church in Friendship on October 15, 1967 and remained a faithful member until his passing. At church he served as a deacon from 1973 to present, and also served as Sunday school superintendent, assistant teacher, moderator, and as a trustee. He also participated in the Laughery Baptist Association Men’s Brotherhood and served on the association’s executive committee. He was also a member of the Hopewell Masonic Lodge at Dillsboro and in 1999 Dib was named a Kentucky Colonel. Funeral services will be held on Wednesday, February 21st at 11am at the Bear Creek Baptist Church in Friendship with Rev. Sherman Hughes officiating. Burial will be in the Akers Friendship Cemetery. Visitation will be on Tuesday from 4pm to 7pm at the Stratton-Karsteter Funeral Home in Versailles and from 10am until time of services Wednesday at the church. The Hopewell Masonic Lodge will conduct services at 7pm Tuesday at the funeral home. Memorials may be given to the Bear Creek Baptist Church or the Akers Friendship Cemetery in care of the funeral home.last_img read more

Students advocate for solar panel installation

first_imgStudents marched on Trousdale Parkway Wednesday afternoon to advocate for the installation of solar panels on USC roofs as part of a protest organized by the USC Go Solar Campaign, a branch of the Environmental Core.Connor Mitchell, a freshman majoring in business administration, said the University has a unique opportunity to reduce its carbon footprint of because of Los Angeles’s commonly sunny weather.“USC should adopt solar because we have days like this all year long, and there is this energy out there that can power our planet,” Mitchell said.The protest began at the Annenberg Amphitheater as dozens of students convened to distribute posters emblazoned with slogans like “USC is Bright, Let’s Use the Light” and “Why Aren’t We Using Our Roofs.” Environmental Core co-directors Ethan Bialick and Zach Manta gave brief speeches detailing the group’s efforts to bring solar panels to the University, as well as the goals of the protest.“Today we’re coming here with a proposal that literally says this company will pay USC to put solar on these roofs,” Bialick said. “We’re bringing this to them, and we’re going to protest that they need to do this now [and] they need to make a commitment now.”Demonstrators then marched down Trousdale Parkway, before circling in front of Tommy Trojan. Students, led by Manta, chanted slogans such as “This is the hour for solar power” and “Solar makes sense.” Afterward, students shared their own reasons for why they thought solar power was a top priority for USC.“I support USC switching to solar because, as a world-class University at a time when renewable is readily available, there is no reason why we should be relying on dirty fossil fuels,” said Olivia Pearson, a freshman majoring in environmental engineering.After the protest, the Environmental Core presented administration officials with a proposal from the energy company SolarCity to lease USC’s unused rooftops to install solar panels owned and maintained by the company. The University will only need to host the panels and collect the lease payments from Solar City, which will alleviate the financial burden of the solar panels.“We’ve repeatedly been told by administrators that they’re not willing to put the money down and invest in solar systems because the payback period is too long for their high-risk, high-reward financial strategies,” Manta said. “Although solar does financially make sense, we want to be very clear that this is not primarily a financial decision.”Bialick hopes that the protest will show the University’s administration that installing solar panels is both socially responsible and financially feasible.“Ideally, they would recognize that they have a sustainability plan that says they’ll procure renewable energy when economic, and this [proposal] literally pays them to get renewable energy,” Bialick said. “If they refuse this, they’re essentially breaking from what they said.”last_img read more