Seven Vermont towns get $1.3 million for new police hiring

first_imgHartford Police Department$182,324Milton Police Department$226,477Pittsford Police Department$212,742Rutland County Sheriff’s Department$153,110University of VT & State Agriculture College$204,501Vergennes Police Department$133,313Windsor Police Department$200,856Total:$1,313,323 Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) Grants Awarded To Vermont Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) announced Wednesday that seven police departments across Vermont have been awarded grants through the Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) Hiring Program.  The grants total more than $1.3 million to help law enforcement departments hire officers. ‘The COPS program has helped Vermont communities keep officers on the streets, which helps keep all Vermonters safe,’ said Leahy.  ‘These grants have helped law enforcement departments in Vermont and across the country for nearly 20 years.  The COPS program is an important partnership between the federal government and state and local law enforcement, and I will be working in Congress to ensure that we maintain our commitment to this successful program.’ Vermont communities have received nearly $46 million in grants from the COPS program since 1994.  More than 285 officers have been hired across Vermont as a result of these grants.  Grants awarded through the COPS Hiring program allow law enforcement agencies to hire or re-hire career officers.  The grants provide 100 percent funding for approved entry-level salaries and benefits for three years for newly-hired officers, or for re-hired officers who have been laid off as a result of local budget cuts.  The COPS program began in the 1990s, helping to put more than 100,000 new officers on the streets.  Leahy has worked in recent years to secure funding for the COPS program after its budget was cut during the Bush administration.  In 2009, Leahy successfully included $4 billion in the economic stimulus package for state and local law enforcement programs, including $1 billion for the COPS program.  Law enforcement departments in Hartford, Milton, Pittsford, Rutland County, Vergennes, and Windsor have been awarded COPS grants.  The University of Vermont & State Agriculture College has also been awarded a grant. Leahy is the Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee.  In recent years, he has focused part of the Committee’s work on examining the federal partnership with state and local law enforcement agencies.  He has chaired a series of Committee hearings in Vermont to highlight the state’s successful, community-based approach to fighting crime. last_img read more

Developers postpone planned plastics manufacturing facility in Ohio

first_imgDevelopers postpone planned plastics manufacturing facility in Ohio FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Inside Climate News:The developers of a proposed plastics manufacturing plant in Ohio on Friday indefinitely delayed a final decision on whether to proceed, citing economic uncertainties around the coronavirus pandemic.Their announcement was a blow to the Trump administration and local economic development officials, who envision a petrochemical hub along the Ohio River in Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia.Environmental activists have opposed what they say would be heavily polluting installations and say bringing the petrochemical industry to this part of Appalachia is the wrong move for a region befouled for years by coal and steel.Thailand’s PTT Global Chemical America and South Korea’s Daelim Industrial have been planning major investments in the $5.7 billion plant, 60 miles southwest of Pittsburgh, for several years.On the site of a former coal-fired power plant, the facility would have turned abundant ethane from fracking in the Marcellus and Utica shale regions into ethylene and polyethylene, which are basic building blocks for all sorts of plastic products.In March, financial analysts with IHS Markit, a global information and data company, and the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA), a nonprofit think tank, agreed the project was in trouble even before the coronavirus began to shrink the global economy.  A global backlash against plastics, low prices and an oversupply of polyethylene, were all signs of troubling economic headwinds before Covid-19 sent world oil prices tumbling, disrupting the petrochemicals industry.[James Bruggers]More: Developers put a plastics plant in Ohio on indefinite hold, citing the Covid-19 pandemiclast_img read more