Louisiana League reflects on Katrina, Rita 10 years later

first_img 20SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Ten years after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita devastated New Orleans and the Gulf Coast, the nation still talks about the largest natural disaster in U.S. history. One shining light in those dark days was credit unions, who banded together to support other credit unions and thousands of members who lost their livelihoods and homes. The Louisiana Credit Union League (LCUL) marked the occasion and the lessons learned in its eNews (Aug. 28).In the hurricanes’ aftermath, Louisiana credit union employees faced personal challenges, damage to facilities and loss of key staff, but stayed determined to help their members. “While the days following Hurricane Katrina were filled with challenges and uncertainty for Louisiana credit unions and their members, credit union employees returned to work and ensured that branches were re-opened quickly to serve members,” said LCUL President/CEO Anne Cochran. The employees “implemented our philosophy of ‘people helping people’ when members needed it the most and were instrumental in the recovery and progress made in Louisiana’s credit union movement since 2005,” she added.Most of the assistance the state’s credit unions received was from within the credit union movement, a resource other financial institutions did not have. CUNA and its state leagues mobilized for fund-raisers and donations from foundations and individual credit unions offered office space, funds and clothing. continue reading »last_img read more

‘Our decisions matter’: Binghamton University professor says there is still hope in this pandemic

first_img“If we’re successful in flattening the curve, there will be an inflection point,” said Wander. “You’ll start to see a little bit slower growth of the number of cases and that’s what we’re looking for… to keep the number of cases in line with our medical system’s capacity.” Kathy Wander is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Binghamton University. She says when this crisis quickly grew into a pandemic, it was scary. She says the most alarming part was the ratio of how many people were infected by one person who had the coronavirus. “The average for influenza was estimated at one-point-three and already, that’s a huge public health problem in the U.S., but two is brutal, so whatever we can do to bring that number down, is going to save lives,” said Wander. (WBNG) — Epidemiologist and biological anthropologist at Binghamton University, Kathy Wander, says there’s no reason to lose hope during this crisis, as long as we work together. Overall, Wander says none of our efforts will work unless we all do it together. She added it doesn’t matter if you have symptoms or not, or if you know anyone with the virus or not, you must follow the simple rules of social distancing and washing your hands. While some countries such as China have appeared to reach a peak and are seeing a somewhat downward trend, Wander says it’s difficult to predict if that will be the same fate for the United States. She says every country is different in healthcare systems and how they are responding to this pandemic. However, she did say we are more guaranteed to see the same trend if we can each make the biggest impact, which involves social distancing. “Our decisions matter. We can control this,” said Wander. “We just need to make the right decisions together.”last_img read more