Transfer applications up slightly

first_imgThe USC Office of Admission has seen a small increase in the number of transfer applications received this year, though officials say the jump is not dramatic.According to Tim Brunold, director of undergraduate admission, the number of transfer applications is up about 3 to 5 percent.Brunold said the increase of California applicants is not drastically different than the overall increase in applications, though he suspects the slight increase can be attributed to the current turmoil in higher education.“It’s probably been a 200 application increase from California, which would be proportional to that overall increase,” Brunold said.With the recent budget cuts to California higher education, state community colleges and University of California schools have had to cut back on the number of courses offered to its students, raising a possible explanation for the increase in transfer applications.“I wouldn’t say that the increase has been dramatic,” Brunold said. “It’s not as if we are seeing a huge percentage increase from a certain type of school, but there definitely has been a reasonable size increase from the UCs. Last year we got about 400 from the UC system, and this year we have about 450 — an increase that is more than coincidental.”According to preliminary data, the quality of the transfer applicant pool has also stayed at a high level, a trend that the admission office said it sees every year.“We do ask for students to self-report what their GPA is, and that number is at the same high quality it has been in past years,” Brunold said. “Those patterns look similar, which is a very positive thing for us.”For Kevin Khakshouri, a junior majoring in policy, planning and development, his transfer from Santa Monica College to USC brought with it a change in work ethic.“You have to do a lot more reading; it’s basically more work,” Khakshouri said of his transition to USC. “I could get by without doing the reading, whereas at ’SC I can’t wait till the last minute. I have to stay consistent.”For USC, the recent transfer applicant pool is indicative of the increasing caliber of students looking to transfer.“Our transfer applicants are very high quality. Last year the average transfer had a 3.65 GPA. Every indication so far is that the quality has stayed the same. It certainly has not gone down,” Brunold said. “It’s getting to the point where the typical rate of transfer admission is similar to freshman admits.”last_img read more

Exchange Students Learn Our Culture from Red Bank Tour

first_imgBy Madelynne KislovskyRED BANK – Twenty-two graduate students from the People’s Republic of China attended a delegation visit and tour of Red Bank Monday to broaden their understanding of our culture.All of the attendees were either M.B.A. or M.S. accounting students of the Seton Hall University Stillman School of Business. In addition to being given a visual tour of Red Bank, the students were able to speak with several community partners during a panel discussion.One student added a bit of comedy into the session, asking if the town of Red Bank was named after a large crimson finance building and where it might be located, unaware of the red clay that used to cover the riverbanks that gave the town its name.The F.I.S.H. Institute, the company that organized the tour, is an international student experience company and a vendor with Seton Hall University. The goal of this company is to get foreign students involved with the community and society that they are studying in, said the super visor of the students, Brad Childs. “The way that the communities and businesses work together in Red Bank is completely different than what these students are used to in China. We want them to understand the environment they’re in, and what better way to provide them with culture than this?” Childs said.Mayor Pasquale Menna said the event came about through his participation in a program sponsored by Seton Hall’s urban development project conducted by faculty member Henry Amoroso, Menna’s friend.The Student Delegation began with a question and answer session by a few dignitaries and other partners of the community to educate the graduate students of the Red Bank community. Members of the discussion panel included Mayor Menna; Christopher Cole, the CEO of Metrovation Terranomics Development; Tria Deibert, director of marketing for Meridian Health, which operates Riverview Medical Center; Domenic DiPiero, Jr., owner of The Two River Times and the financial services firm Newport Capital Group, LLC; Adam Philipson, CEO of the Count Basie Theatre, and James Scavone, executive director of Red Bank RiverCenter, which oversees the borough’s commercial special improvement district.Menna and the other panelists talked about how Red Bank works together in order to thrive. “Every municipality, in order to survive, has to change,” Menna explained to the students. The students were able to hear how partnerships between the municipality and other local organizations and companies directly benefit the community as a whole. “It’s all about partnerships in the community, which is a critical element of being successful in business,” CEO Christopher Cole said. “These little things keep our community interesting and unique.”The exchange students asked about the meaning of the black POW-MIA flag flying high outside the municipal complex at 90 Monmouth St., how to operate a successful nonprofit theater like Count Basie, and how Red Bank’s medical centers are able to compete with larger hospitals and treatment centers in major cities, like Manhattan and Jersey City. Deibert explained that “in order to stay current, we have to reinvent ourselves,” referring to the $130 million investment in new equipment, technology, and medical professionals, to provide patients with the same treatment as larger facilities along with that close-to-home convenience.Menna touched on many aspects of the Red Bank community, including the large Hispanic population, sustainable assistance for those living in rent-controlled apartments, and the long list of restaurants to choose from that has now grown to over a 100.Menna called the visit “a wonderful opportunity,” and explained his hope of educating the exchange students on the endeavors that make Red Bank successful, especially in the areas of the arts, the medical field, and finance redevelopment.Sean Mulheren, a research assistant for the Stillman School of Business at Seton Hall, attended the visit as well. “I just wanted to participate, and bridge the gap between foreign and American students on campus,” Mulheren said. He explained that the experience Seton Hall provides these students, where they are introduced to a part of America that they were unaware of, is an experience that many of the students can’t find anywhere else. “They seem to be enjoying it,” Mulheren said.One of the visiting students, Vincent Wei, had never been to any area outside of the Seton Hall campus in South Orange. The accounting and finance major, a native of Beijing, was looking for ward to the trip.The tour of the community began with the Count Basie Theatre, 99 Monmouth St., where the students met the Golden Dragon Acrobats, natives of the People’s Republic of China who have toured the U.S. since 1978. They were welcomed upon entering the theater by rows and rows of young children anxiously waiting for the performance to start, who serenaded the exchange students with a sing-along of Br uno Mars’ “Uptown Funk.” The exchange students were pleased with the joyous, welcoming atmosphere, and the beautiful architecture of the Count Basie Theatre.The tour included the Two River Theater, the West Side Lofts apartment complex, and the Galleria shops/farmers market, which holds businesses such as Pilates of Red Bank and the restaurant The Melting Pot. The tour ended at Riverside Gardens Park, where the group saw the beautiful scenery and took a photo with Menna.Jing Zhang, another accounting student of the Stillman School of Business and native of Beijing, said that this visit helped her realize the importance of actively participating in environmentally-conscience actions, to benefit the lives of her generation’s children and grandchildren. Zhang’s favorite place on the tour was the Count Basie Theatre. “I could feel the culture there, and the ceilings were really cool,” she said.The exchange students were able to see the artistic, residential, business, and environmental aspects of Red Bank, a town that one student referred to as, “the new New York.”last_img read more

Red Bank Human Rights Advocates Urge Respect at Rally

first_imgBy Chris RotoloRED BANK –When he was practicing law on the social justice front, Rabbi Marc Kline spent the better part of a decade in Columbia, South Carolina, where he stood side by side with giants of the field like attorney Morris Dees and Martin Luther King III.Kline said that experience of working, advocating and going toe-to-toe with the Klu Klux Klan during a spree of mid-to-late ’90s church burnings has informed the way he approaches the battle against hatred and bigotry still being fought today in the Two River area, though frustration and exasperation are setting in.“I’m tired of combating the same force over and over and over again,” Kline said to a congregation of approximately 150 demonstrators, including state Sen. Vin Gopal (D-11) and Red Bank Mayor Pasquale Menna, who gathered outside Red Bank’s borough hall Aug. 30 to rally in support of the borough’s Human Relations Advisory Committee (HRAC) and the launch of its “No Hate at Home” campaign.“I’ve been fighting the Klan for many years, too long, and I’m tired of the hate,” Kline said. “It’s gotten uglier and uglier. And the Klan is code word for all hate speech right now.”Demonstrators gathered outside Red Bank’s Town Hall Aug. 31 to support a rally for the “No Hate at Home” campaign. Photo by Chris Rotolo.According to Kline, who leads the Monmouth Reform Temple in Tinton Falls, the initiative is a response to pro-KKK fliers distributed on Hudson Avenue Aug. 14 and KKK recruitment literature containing candy that was discovered on Leighton Avenue the week prior.Kline made it clear this campaign was comprehensive of all hate speech, including racial, religious and political prejudices he said are tearing society apart at the seams.“I’m tired of the fact that we can’t talk with each other without screaming at each other. We’re at a point where, if you don’t agree with me politically or religiously, you don’t have value. And then everyone goes about their business assuming they’re right…It really doesn’t matter what your politics are. There are some things that we’ve made partisan politics that are still about the human. And we’ve forgotten the human piece of it.”Leading the effort with Kline is David Pascal, who has served as the HRAC chair since 2006, and who hopes “No Hate at Home” can become a movement focused on respect and understanding between individuals, even if positions and ideas may not align.“For those who believe that another person can’t have value if you don’t agree, today that has to stop,” Pascal said. “This is about bringing respect for one another back into our homes, our communities, our places of business, schools, everywhere. It has to happen everywhere if we’re going to change the conversation and change the culture.”Kline and Pascal were adamant that this movement can only take hold if community members in attendance were willing to carry the message back into their own communities, a sentiment shared by Menna.According to Menna, the borough has a history of assisting the general community by providing an avenue for expression, quite literally providing a route through town earlier this year for the “March for our Lives” demonstration March 24 and again in July for the “Families Belong Together” protests. But he believes the key to ensuring “No Hate at Home” makes an impact is carrying the messaging beyond Red Bank’s borders.“The sense that I get is that people who participate in events like today’s are overwhelmingly from outside of Red Bank,” Menna said. “It tells me that the people we need to reach need to be reached in their own communities. For each person in the crowd today who is from Rumson or Little Silver, there are a thousand people who are not reached.”Menna said surrounding municipalities can’t be forced to form a committee similar to HRAC, but individuals from those communities should be making applications to their respective governing bodies to host the types of events “where people can voice their collective sentiments about human rights.”“The people (HRAC) is trying to reach are not the people who are living in Red Bank,” Menna said. “We already know about it. The people (HRAC) is trying to reach are the people who are living in the leafy communities of Rumson, Fair Haven, Little Silver, Monmouth Beach, Interlaken. That’s where the message has to go.”Kline called the Aug. 30 rally a good start, but said the work to ensure this is not a “one-off” begins now.“Rallies and marches are nice because you get to wave your flag and hold your sign and go home feeling good about it. But then what?” Kline said. “We need to have signs in yards, decals on cars and conversation in our communities. We need to create a change in our culture. With this rally, we’ve started the conversation.”This article was first published in the Sept. 6 – 13, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

REVEALED: FRAUDSTER’S SECRET VISITS TO CO DONEGAL

first_imgA FRENCH fraudster who stole millions of euro from Co Donegal investors has made secret visits back here, investigators believe.Officers from the PSNI and Interpol are checking reports that Francois de Dietrich travelled here under a false passport using freight ferries between France and Britain and then between Britain and the North.The most recent trip could have been just two months ago at a time when a European arrest warrant had been issued. He had fled a village near Paris last year after his location became known to French police.“We believe he may have used a DFDS freight route between Belfast and Heysham for the journey to Northern Ireland,” said one PSNI officer today.“And we believe he may have used that route on several occasions, perhaps as recently as February, before travelling to the North West to Derry and then to Donegal.”Gardai and the PSNI are keen to hear from anyone who have seen the conman in the North West in recent months.Francois de Dietrich offered dozens of Donegal investors massive returns if they handed over money to him.Some people initially made money out of their ‘investment’ but ultimately around €30M was scammed, with police now believing up to €20M of that was taken from people in Co Donegal.But donegaldaily.com rumbled the scam and de Dietrich fled the country.However British and Irish authorities moved to freeze bank accounts containing tens of millions of euro north and south of the Border.In January the French man, who was formerly based in Ballybofey, failed to turn up for a court hearing in Belfast where he was due to appeal an 18-month prison sentence for contempt of court.The jail term was imposed after he refused to reveal details of his worldwide assets to the UK Financial Services Authority.His former solicitor in Belfast was given permission by the courts to end representation for him.REVEALED: FRAUDSTER’S SECRET VISITS TO CO DONEGAL was last modified: April 25th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Francois de DietrichREVEALED: FRAUDSTER’S SECRET VISITS TO CO DONEGALlast_img read more

Champions League: Messi masterclass lights up Wembley, sinks Tottenham

first_imgLionel Messi was at his best at Wembley on Wednesday as he wrecked havoc in the Tottenham Hotspur to help Barcelona beat them 4-2 in a thrilling Champions League Group B contest.In front of some 82,000 fans in London’s national stadium, Messi scored a brace to reach 105 Champions League goals, hit the woodwork twice and had a major hand in the other two Barcelona goals — the Argentine maestro ruled the roost.Such was the masterclass of Messi on Wednesday that both sets of fans applauded the ‘magician’ after a match that proved to be a brilliant advert for Champions League football.With the win, Barcelona are joint leaders of the group on six points with Inter Milan. Tottenham face back-to-back games against PSV Eindhoven with both teams having lost their first two matches.Leo Messi has now scored 64 goals in 65 group stage games #UCL pic.twitter.com/YJW1PNfP9cUEFA Champions League (@ChampionsLeague) October 3, 2018Injury-hit Tottenham faced an uphill task against the five-times European champions once Philippe Coutinho scored after two minutes and when Ivan Rakitic’s breathtaking volley made it 2-0 before halftime a hammering looked on the cards.But Barcelona needed the mercurial Messi at his best to repel a tenacious Spurs fightback as Harry Kane and Erik Lamela gave the hosts, described as “heroes” by their manager Mauricio Pochettino, a glimmer of hope.Only when Messi struck his second in stoppage-time, his fifth of this season’s tournament after a hat-trick against PSV, could coach Ernesto Valverde breathe a little easier.advertisement”After a few bad results it was important to do well today. Our response was very good,” Valverde, under the cosh after Barca drew two and lost one of their last three La Liga games, told reporters.Also read – Champions League: Manchester United play out goalless draw at home vs Valencia”The game was very tense. We had a few problems during the game but we managed to solve them.”Pochettino said his plan had gone out of the window after his side’s woeful start.”I’m disappointed with the result but the effort was massive,” he said.Barcelona were vulnerable so they said, but on a pitch scarred from hosting British heavyweight champion Anthony Joshua’s fight against Alexander Povetkin they took only two minutes to catch Spurs in the solar plexus.Tottenham allowed Messi time to curl a pass to Jordi Alba on the left and with keeper Hugo Lloris, back from injury, charging out Alba cut the ball back to Coutinho who drilled home through a gaggle of defenders.The hosts responded with Kane firing in a shot that did not have enough venom to worry Marc-Andre ter Stegen.15 minutes to play and we’re one goal behind at Wembley.COME ON YOU SPURS!#THFC 2-3 #FCB pic.twitter.com/VNT7H9IAKPTottenham Hotspur (@SpursOfficial) October 3, 2018PERFECT VOLLEYMessi opened up Tottenham again in the 28th minute. His floated pass was chested down by Luis Suarez to Coutinho whose volley sliced up in the air before the quick-thinking Brazilian hooked the ball back to Rakitic who rifled a picture-perfect right-foot volley in off the post from 25 yards.Messi, who scored for Barca in the 2011 final against Manchester United at Wembley, revelled in the wide-open spaces and twice sliced through the Spurs defence shortly after the break, thudding shots against Lloris’s right post.Instead of being 4-0 down, however, Tottenham striker Kane halved the deficit in the 52nd minute with a clinical finish.Also read – Champions League: 10-man CSKA Moscow ride on Vlasic goal to stun Real MadridMessi shook his head in disbelief but soon silenced the home crowd again — this time side-footing inside the post from Alba’s cross to finish a flowing move he started.There was no let-up and after Kane worked hard to win the ball, Lamela gave Spurs another lifeline when his 66th-minute shot flicked off Clement Lenglet and past Ter Stegen.A gallant Tottenham side, missing the likes of Dele Alli, Christian Eriksen and Jan Vertonghen, almost levelled when Lucas Moura’s shot deflected wide but Messi ended their resistance after again being picked out by Alba.(With Reuters inputs)last_img read more