Sanders shrugs off primary defeats, remains in Democratic race

first_imgSpeculation had been growing that he might respond to pleas from Democratic activists to step aside for party unity, giving Biden — his only rival — a chance to focus on campaigning against Trump.But Sanders, 78, broke his silence to say he was preparing for his first one-on-one televised debate Sunday “with my friend Joe Biden.”While he remained defiant, Sanders did make a number of unusual statements, accepting both his losses during the primary race and perceptions that he would fare less well against Trump.”I cannot tell you how many people our campaign has spoken to who say they agree with us but will vote for Joe because they believe he’s the best to beat Donald Trump,” he said. Bernie Sanders on Wednesday shrugged off a string of primary defeats and pressure to drop out of the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, saying he remains in the fight against centrist frontrunner Joe Biden.In his first remarks since losing to Biden in Michigan, Missouri, Mississippi and Idaho on Tuesday, the leftist senator from Vermont said his main priority was defeating “dangerous” President Donald Trump.He acknowledged, however, in a brief, passionate speech that many Democrats see him as less electable than the 77-year-old former vice president — perhaps preparing the ground for his eventual exit. “Needless to say, I strongly disagree with that assertion, but that’s what millions of Democrats and independents say.”Sanders then listed questions he wanted Biden to answer on how to deal with far-reaching inequality and other structural issues that he believes can only be addressed by radical economic change or “revolution.””Joe, what are you going to do?” he asked in what sounded less like an attack on Biden than an appeal for him to reach out to the party’s left wing. Biden unstoppable? Biden’s trajectory to a November showdown with Trump began looking unstoppable after his primary wins on Tuesday, including in the industrial powerhouse of Michigan — a state that Sanders won over Hillary Clinton in 2016 and will be crucial in the general election.Sanders’ only win came in North Dakota while votes were still being counted in Washington state, where Sanders and Biden were in a dead heat.Biden now has about 860 delegates to Sanders’ 710, and looks set to reach the 1,991 needed to be declared the party standard bearer at the Democratic convention in Milwaukee in July.The next primaries are on March 11 in Arizona, Florida, Illinois and Ohio and campaigning in the delegate-rich states is being disrupted by the coronavirus outbreak.Biden and Sanders cancelled rallies which had been scheduled in Cleveland, Ohio, on Tuesday night and the former vice president announced further cancellations on Wednesday.The Biden campaign said because of health risks it was cancelling an event that was to have been held in Chicago on Friday and one that was scheduled for Miami on Monday.It said they would now be “virtual events” but did not release details of the format.The Sunday debate will also be without a live audience as a result of the health scare.Addressing supporters in Philadelphia on Tuesday, Biden reached out to Sanders, thanking him and his supporters for their “tireless energy and their passion.”Biden struck a unifying tone as he affirmed that he and Sanders “share a common goal and together we will defeat Donald Trump.”Uniting the ticket With Biden’s path to the nomination increasingly locked in, the main question now is whether Sanders will swallow his pride and get his supporters behind the candidate — or risk party civil war.”It will be vital for Sanders to mobilize his supporters behind the ticket,” tweeted Princeton University history professor Julian Zelizer.”But Biden has to reach out to Sanders’s energized movement. It will require a two-way effort to unite the ticket.”Many Democrats accuse Sanders and his devoted supporters of fatally damaging Clinton four years ago during their bitter nomination battle. They warn a similar scenario could play out this time.Reflecting the shift in power, Democratic political action committee Priorities USA, which had been neutral in the race, came out in support of Biden.”The delegate math is now a straight line to Joe Biden’s nomination,” chairman Guy Cecil told US public radio network NPR. “So we’re going to do everything we can to help him in the effort looking forward to November.”Topics :last_img read more

Scottsburg United, No 73 Young Warriors to clash in Trophy Stall UCCA U-19 50 overs cricket final

first_imgTHE finalists of the second edition of the Trophy Stall and Upper Corentyne Cricket Association (UCCA) Under-19 Inter-club 50 overs cricket tournaments have been decided.The finalists are Scottsburg United and No 73 Young Warriors.In semifinal play, No, 73 Young Warriors got the better of No. 72 Cut and Load by 27 runs in a close encounter, in their game played at the No. 72 Cut and Load ground.Young Warriors batted first and fought their way to 109 all out in 29 overs. Victor Latchman top-scored with 34 while Niradt Singh made 16.Bowling for Cut and Load, Seeraj Chatterpaul led the way with 4 wickets – Charran Singh taking 3 and Mukesh Edwards 2.In reply, No. 72 Cut and Load were cut down for 72 in 18.5 overs with Salim Somdat contributing 27.Bowling for Young Warriors, off-spinner Rawle Jabbar 5-20 and leg-spinner Salim Khan 5-24 were the destroyers.In the other game, Scottsburg United defeated No. 73 Mandir by 4 wickets in their game played at the Scottsburg ground.No. 73 Mandir batted first and were dismissed for 92 in 14 overs with Andrew Tahal 33 and Inderpaul Singh 21 the top-scorers. Bowling for Scottsburg United, Joel Dhanraj and Aktar Nohar picked up 4 wickets each.Scottsburg United. in reply. reached 93-6 with all-rounder Joel Dhanraj making 21, Brandon Nandalall 20 and S Blair 18. Tahal picked up 2 wickets bowling for No. 73 Mandir.The final is set for today at the Crabwood Creek groundThe tournament is sponsored by Trophy Stall Port Mourant Branch through its General Manager Ramesh Sunich.Seven participated in the competition, the others being No. 43 Cricket Club, No. 66 Cricket Club and No. 73 Mandir and No. 52 Cricket Club.The Trophy Stall with head office in Bourda Market is one of the leading sponsors of sporting activities in Guyana. It is also one of the leading sports and trophy stores in the country.The Trophy Stall, which opened a Branch in Port Mourant Corentyne last year, is happy to give back to the people of Berbice for their unstinted support over the years.General Manager Ramesh Sunich was happy with the way the competition was organised last year and readily agreed to sponsor the competition again. He has committed to further sponsorship.last_img read more

Exchange Students Learn Our Culture from Red Bank Tour

first_imgBy Madelynne KislovskyRED BANK – Twenty-two graduate students from the People’s Republic of China attended a delegation visit and tour of Red Bank Monday to broaden their understanding of our culture.All of the attendees were either M.B.A. or M.S. accounting students of the Seton Hall University Stillman School of Business. In addition to being given a visual tour of Red Bank, the students were able to speak with several community partners during a panel discussion.One student added a bit of comedy into the session, asking if the town of Red Bank was named after a large crimson finance building and where it might be located, unaware of the red clay that used to cover the riverbanks that gave the town its name.The F.I.S.H. Institute, the company that organized the tour, is an international student experience company and a vendor with Seton Hall University. The goal of this company is to get foreign students involved with the community and society that they are studying in, said the super visor of the students, Brad Childs. “The way that the communities and businesses work together in Red Bank is completely different than what these students are used to in China. We want them to understand the environment they’re in, and what better way to provide them with culture than this?” Childs said.Mayor Pasquale Menna said the event came about through his participation in a program sponsored by Seton Hall’s urban development project conducted by faculty member Henry Amoroso, Menna’s friend.The Student Delegation began with a question and answer session by a few dignitaries and other partners of the community to educate the graduate students of the Red Bank community. Members of the discussion panel included Mayor Menna; Christopher Cole, the CEO of Metrovation Terranomics Development; Tria Deibert, director of marketing for Meridian Health, which operates Riverview Medical Center; Domenic DiPiero, Jr., owner of The Two River Times and the financial services firm Newport Capital Group, LLC; Adam Philipson, CEO of the Count Basie Theatre, and James Scavone, executive director of Red Bank RiverCenter, which oversees the borough’s commercial special improvement district.Menna and the other panelists talked about how Red Bank works together in order to thrive. “Every municipality, in order to survive, has to change,” Menna explained to the students. The students were able to hear how partnerships between the municipality and other local organizations and companies directly benefit the community as a whole. “It’s all about partnerships in the community, which is a critical element of being successful in business,” CEO Christopher Cole said. “These little things keep our community interesting and unique.”The exchange students asked about the meaning of the black POW-MIA flag flying high outside the municipal complex at 90 Monmouth St., how to operate a successful nonprofit theater like Count Basie, and how Red Bank’s medical centers are able to compete with larger hospitals and treatment centers in major cities, like Manhattan and Jersey City. Deibert explained that “in order to stay current, we have to reinvent ourselves,” referring to the $130 million investment in new equipment, technology, and medical professionals, to provide patients with the same treatment as larger facilities along with that close-to-home convenience.Menna touched on many aspects of the Red Bank community, including the large Hispanic population, sustainable assistance for those living in rent-controlled apartments, and the long list of restaurants to choose from that has now grown to over a 100.Menna called the visit “a wonderful opportunity,” and explained his hope of educating the exchange students on the endeavors that make Red Bank successful, especially in the areas of the arts, the medical field, and finance redevelopment.Sean Mulheren, a research assistant for the Stillman School of Business at Seton Hall, attended the visit as well. “I just wanted to participate, and bridge the gap between foreign and American students on campus,” Mulheren said. He explained that the experience Seton Hall provides these students, where they are introduced to a part of America that they were unaware of, is an experience that many of the students can’t find anywhere else. “They seem to be enjoying it,” Mulheren said.One of the visiting students, Vincent Wei, had never been to any area outside of the Seton Hall campus in South Orange. The accounting and finance major, a native of Beijing, was looking for ward to the trip.The tour of the community began with the Count Basie Theatre, 99 Monmouth St., where the students met the Golden Dragon Acrobats, natives of the People’s Republic of China who have toured the U.S. since 1978. They were welcomed upon entering the theater by rows and rows of young children anxiously waiting for the performance to start, who serenaded the exchange students with a sing-along of Br uno Mars’ “Uptown Funk.” The exchange students were pleased with the joyous, welcoming atmosphere, and the beautiful architecture of the Count Basie Theatre.The tour included the Two River Theater, the West Side Lofts apartment complex, and the Galleria shops/farmers market, which holds businesses such as Pilates of Red Bank and the restaurant The Melting Pot. The tour ended at Riverside Gardens Park, where the group saw the beautiful scenery and took a photo with Menna.Jing Zhang, another accounting student of the Stillman School of Business and native of Beijing, said that this visit helped her realize the importance of actively participating in environmentally-conscience actions, to benefit the lives of her generation’s children and grandchildren. Zhang’s favorite place on the tour was the Count Basie Theatre. “I could feel the culture there, and the ceilings were really cool,” she said.The exchange students were able to see the artistic, residential, business, and environmental aspects of Red Bank, a town that one student referred to as, “the new New York.”last_img read more

Red Bank Human Rights Advocates Urge Respect at Rally

first_imgBy Chris RotoloRED BANK –When he was practicing law on the social justice front, Rabbi Marc Kline spent the better part of a decade in Columbia, South Carolina, where he stood side by side with giants of the field like attorney Morris Dees and Martin Luther King III.Kline said that experience of working, advocating and going toe-to-toe with the Klu Klux Klan during a spree of mid-to-late ’90s church burnings has informed the way he approaches the battle against hatred and bigotry still being fought today in the Two River area, though frustration and exasperation are setting in.“I’m tired of combating the same force over and over and over again,” Kline said to a congregation of approximately 150 demonstrators, including state Sen. Vin Gopal (D-11) and Red Bank Mayor Pasquale Menna, who gathered outside Red Bank’s borough hall Aug. 30 to rally in support of the borough’s Human Relations Advisory Committee (HRAC) and the launch of its “No Hate at Home” campaign.“I’ve been fighting the Klan for many years, too long, and I’m tired of the hate,” Kline said. “It’s gotten uglier and uglier. And the Klan is code word for all hate speech right now.”Demonstrators gathered outside Red Bank’s Town Hall Aug. 31 to support a rally for the “No Hate at Home” campaign. Photo by Chris Rotolo.According to Kline, who leads the Monmouth Reform Temple in Tinton Falls, the initiative is a response to pro-KKK fliers distributed on Hudson Avenue Aug. 14 and KKK recruitment literature containing candy that was discovered on Leighton Avenue the week prior.Kline made it clear this campaign was comprehensive of all hate speech, including racial, religious and political prejudices he said are tearing society apart at the seams.“I’m tired of the fact that we can’t talk with each other without screaming at each other. We’re at a point where, if you don’t agree with me politically or religiously, you don’t have value. And then everyone goes about their business assuming they’re right…It really doesn’t matter what your politics are. There are some things that we’ve made partisan politics that are still about the human. And we’ve forgotten the human piece of it.”Leading the effort with Kline is David Pascal, who has served as the HRAC chair since 2006, and who hopes “No Hate at Home” can become a movement focused on respect and understanding between individuals, even if positions and ideas may not align.“For those who believe that another person can’t have value if you don’t agree, today that has to stop,” Pascal said. “This is about bringing respect for one another back into our homes, our communities, our places of business, schools, everywhere. It has to happen everywhere if we’re going to change the conversation and change the culture.”Kline and Pascal were adamant that this movement can only take hold if community members in attendance were willing to carry the message back into their own communities, a sentiment shared by Menna.According to Menna, the borough has a history of assisting the general community by providing an avenue for expression, quite literally providing a route through town earlier this year for the “March for our Lives” demonstration March 24 and again in July for the “Families Belong Together” protests. But he believes the key to ensuring “No Hate at Home” makes an impact is carrying the messaging beyond Red Bank’s borders.“The sense that I get is that people who participate in events like today’s are overwhelmingly from outside of Red Bank,” Menna said. “It tells me that the people we need to reach need to be reached in their own communities. For each person in the crowd today who is from Rumson or Little Silver, there are a thousand people who are not reached.”Menna said surrounding municipalities can’t be forced to form a committee similar to HRAC, but individuals from those communities should be making applications to their respective governing bodies to host the types of events “where people can voice their collective sentiments about human rights.”“The people (HRAC) is trying to reach are not the people who are living in Red Bank,” Menna said. “We already know about it. The people (HRAC) is trying to reach are the people who are living in the leafy communities of Rumson, Fair Haven, Little Silver, Monmouth Beach, Interlaken. That’s where the message has to go.”Kline called the Aug. 30 rally a good start, but said the work to ensure this is not a “one-off” begins now.“Rallies and marches are nice because you get to wave your flag and hold your sign and go home feeling good about it. But then what?” Kline said. “We need to have signs in yards, decals on cars and conversation in our communities. We need to create a change in our culture. With this rally, we’ve started the conversation.”This article was first published in the Sept. 6 – 13, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

HEAVILY FAVORED SILENT BIRD WINS FIFTH IN A ROW AS HE TAKES $63,000 SANTA ANITA ALLOWANCE FEATURE BY A NECK UNDER PRAT; TRAINED BY GLATT, HE GETS FLAT MILE ON MUDDY TRACK IN 1:36.52

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (Jan. 6, 2017)–In his first try around two turns, heavily favored Silent Bird ran down longshot El Huerfano late to take Friday’s $63,000 Santa Anita allowance feature by a neck under Flavien Prat.  Trained by Mark Glatt, the 5-year-old horse by Summer Bird got a flat mile in 1:36.52.In hand under Prat around the Club House turn, Silent Bird raced a close fifth past the half mile pole and was on the move in high gear while caught four-wide turning for home, giving punters momentary pause as he veered toward the middle of the track while straightening for home.“He was a little green once he made the lead,” said Prat.  “Once we straightened away, he was fine.”The 3-5 favorite in a field of six older horses, Silent Bird paid $3.60, $2.80 and $2.40.Owned by Norman Stables, LLC, Silent Bird was a winner of the seven furlong Damascus Stakes here two starts back on Nov. 4, and he was a game allowance winner at the same distance on Dec. 1 at Del Mar.  He now has five wins from six starts and with the winner’s share of $37,800, he increased his earnings to $208,800.“I was a little concerned that with this being his first time going long, he might get a little keen, but it was the opposite of that,” said Glatt.  When asked what might be next for the streaking Silent Bird, Glatt responded, “We’ll look at the San Antonio (Grade II, 1 1/16 miles on Feb. 4).  With all the heavy hitters seemingly out of town…Hopefully, he comes back good and we’ll go from there.Sent from the gate by Victor Espinoza, El Huerfano dictated terms throughout through fractions of 23.14, 45.96, 1:10.52 and 1:23.40 and battled back gamely at the rail when challenged a furlong out to finish five lengths in front of Avanti Bello.Off at 6-1, El Huerfano paid $5.20 and $3.60.Ridden by Mario Gutierrez, Avanti Bello was off at 5-1 and paid $3.60 to show.First post time for a nine-race card on Saturday at Santa Anita is at 12:30 p.m.  Admission gates open at 10:30 a.m.last_img read more

Xiaomi I Love Mi sale sees discounts on Mi A2, Redmi 6A and more until Dec 8

first_imgXiaomi and Amazon India have together announced a new 3-day sale called “I love Mi” on the e-commerce’s website. The sale began from December 6 and will last until December 8.Unlike the other Xiaomi deals where you see several phones on offer, this sale covers only few of Xiaomi phones. Buyers will see discounts on Redmi 6A, the Mi A2 and the Redmi Y2.Xiaomi Mi A2 at Rs 14,999: Xiaomi Mi A2 was launched in July 2018 at Rs 16,999 but you can get it for Rs 14,999 during the sale period. This is after a discount of Rs 2500 on the MRP of the phone. The Mi A2 with 6GB RAM and 128GB storage will sell for Rs 16,999 in Amazon’s I love Xiaomi sale.Xiaomi Mi A2 sports a 5.99-inch display with a resolution of 1080 pixels by 2160 pixels. It is powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 660 octa-core processor paired with 4GB of RAM and 64GB of internal storage that is non-expandable. On the optics front, the Xiaomi Mi A2 packs a 12MP primary camera and a 20MP secondary camera on the rear and a 20MP front camera. Phone is powered by a 3000mAh non removable battery and runs Android One.Redmi Y2 at Rs 8,999: Redmi Y2 was launched in June 2018. Xiaomi is giving a discount of up to Rs 2000 on the MRP bringing down the price to Rs 8,999. This is the price for the Redmi Y2 with 3GB RAM and 32GB internal storage. The Redmi Y2 with 4GB RAM and 64GB storage is priced at Rs 10,999, a discount of up to Rs 2500 on the MRP.advertisementThe Redmi Y2 sports a 5.99-inch display with a resolution of 720 pixels by 1440 pixels. It is powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 625 processor paired with 3GB of RAM and 32GB of internal storage that can be expanded up to 256GB via a microSD card. The phone comes with a 12MP rear camera and a 16MP front camera. The phone is powered by a 3080mAh non removable battery.Redmi 6A at Rs 5,999: Redmi 6A was launched in September this year. The phone has received a Rs 1000 price cut on its MRP and selling at Rs 5,999 on Amazon.Redmi 6A sports a 5.45-inch display with a resolution of 720 pixels by 1440 pixels. It is powered by 2GHz quad-core (4x2GHz) processor and it comes with 2GB of RAM. The phone packs 16GB of internal storage that can be expanded up to 256GB via a microSD card. On the optics front, the Xiaomi Redmi 6A packs a 13MP on the rear and a 5MP front camera. The phone is powered by a 3000mAh non removable battery.last_img read more