Students advocate for solar panel installation

first_imgStudents marched on Trousdale Parkway Wednesday afternoon to advocate for the installation of solar panels on USC roofs as part of a protest organized by the USC Go Solar Campaign, a branch of the Environmental Core.Connor Mitchell, a freshman majoring in business administration, said the University has a unique opportunity to reduce its carbon footprint of because of Los Angeles’s commonly sunny weather.“USC should adopt solar because we have days like this all year long, and there is this energy out there that can power our planet,” Mitchell said.The protest began at the Annenberg Amphitheater as dozens of students convened to distribute posters emblazoned with slogans like “USC is Bright, Let’s Use the Light” and “Why Aren’t We Using Our Roofs.” Environmental Core co-directors Ethan Bialick and Zach Manta gave brief speeches detailing the group’s efforts to bring solar panels to the University, as well as the goals of the protest.“Today we’re coming here with a proposal that literally says this company will pay USC to put solar on these roofs,” Bialick said. “We’re bringing this to them, and we’re going to protest that they need to do this now [and] they need to make a commitment now.”Demonstrators then marched down Trousdale Parkway, before circling in front of Tommy Trojan. Students, led by Manta, chanted slogans such as “This is the hour for solar power” and “Solar makes sense.” Afterward, students shared their own reasons for why they thought solar power was a top priority for USC.“I support USC switching to solar because, as a world-class University at a time when renewable is readily available, there is no reason why we should be relying on dirty fossil fuels,” said Olivia Pearson, a freshman majoring in environmental engineering.After the protest, the Environmental Core presented administration officials with a proposal from the energy company SolarCity to lease USC’s unused rooftops to install solar panels owned and maintained by the company. The University will only need to host the panels and collect the lease payments from Solar City, which will alleviate the financial burden of the solar panels.“We’ve repeatedly been told by administrators that they’re not willing to put the money down and invest in solar systems because the payback period is too long for their high-risk, high-reward financial strategies,” Manta said. “Although solar does financially make sense, we want to be very clear that this is not primarily a financial decision.”Bialick hopes that the protest will show the University’s administration that installing solar panels is both socially responsible and financially feasible.“Ideally, they would recognize that they have a sustainability plan that says they’ll procure renewable energy when economic, and this [proposal] literally pays them to get renewable energy,” Bialick said. “If they refuse this, they’re essentially breaking from what they said.”last_img read more

MGA cancels Sports Fantech’s B2C gaming licence

first_img Related Articles Betby receives green light from MGA August 10, 2020 Share Share Submit MGA survey reveals investment postponements as COVID-19 biggest rupture  May 28, 2020 StumbleUpon MGA report reveals 14 licences cancelled in 2019 June 23, 2020 The Malta Gaming Authority (MGA) has continued its crackdown on operators in breach of the country’s gaming laws after it confirmed it has cancelled Sports Fantech’s B2C gaming licence with immediate effect. Under the new ruling, Sports Fantech will no longer be permitted to carry out any gaming operations, register new players or accept new customer deposits. However, the regulator has specified that the operator ‘is required to retain and provide all registered players with access to their player accounts and to refund all funds standing to the credit of players in line with the applicable law’.Sports Fantech was previously authorised to offer type 4 gaming services such as controlled skill games on a B2C basis via its licence.The MGA ruled that Sports Fantech breached paragraph H of the Third Schedule to the Gaming Act, whereby it failed to make payments to the MGA when lawfully due.Sports Fantech will be permitted to appeal the ruling under article 43 of the Gaming Act. Earlier this year, the MGA announced a trio of licensee suspensions, confirming that it had suspended the licences of German/Turkish online bookmaker Betixx Limited, alongside Silema-based industry games developer Morpheus Games (MT).The MGA also fully terminated the operator licence of World-of-bets EU Limited, which had held a licence in Malta since 2008. Under the termination, the regulator redirected visitors from the World-of-bets flagship portal wobets.com towards an MGA holding page.last_img read more