Victims Pistol-whipped in Baywood, North Bay Shore Home Invasions

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County police are investigating a pair of armed home invasions during which victims were pistol whipped about one mile apart on the same day last week in Baywood and North Bay Shore, authorities said.In the first case, a gunman with his face covered kicked in the door of a Baywood home on Sonia Road, hit the victim in the head with a gun and demanded money at 4:25 a.m. Thursday, police said. The attacker fled empty handed.In the second case, three men—two of whom were armed with handguns—and a woman rang the doorbell of a Hemlock Drive apartment in North Bay Shore and then forced their way inside when the victim answered the door shortly before 10 p.m. Thursday, police said.That victim was also pistol whipped before the assailants fled with two watches, police said.There were neither any arrests nor descriptions of the suspects in either case. Third Squad detectives are continuing the investigations.last_img read more

Some States Receiving Rotted, Broken Medical Supplies from National Stockpile

first_imgSome states and cities across the country that have received shipments of masks, gloves, ventilators and other equipment from the nation’s medical stockpile to fight say the materials are unusable.For example, about 6,000 medical masks that were sent to Alabama had dry rot and a 2010 expiration date.In addition, more than 150 ventilators shipped to Los Angeles were broken and had to be repaired.Meanwhile, in Oregon, some masks came with faulty elastic that could cause the straps to snap.“Several of the shipments we have received from the strategic national stockpile contained (personal protective equipment) well past expiration dates and, while we are being told much of the expired equipment is capable of being used for COVID-19 response, they would not be suitable for use in surgical settings,” Charles Boyle, a spokesman for Oregon Gov. Kate Brown, said in an email.He added that some of the equipment had been purchased during the H1N1 outbreak more than a decade ago and that the masks were among products that had previously recalled by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  Dr. Don Williamson, president of the Alabama Hospital Association and the former top public health official in that state, says he has received multiple emails from hospitals about stockpile shipments of N95 masks in which the rubber bands that hold the mask tight around the user’s face had dry rot. A shortage of protective gear has challenged doctors, nurses and other medical workers. In particular, ventilators have been in short supply as more states experience COVID-19 outbreaks.center_img “It’s really alarming because those masks are desperately needed,” explains U.S. Sen. Doug Jones of Alabama. “When our national stockpile is not monitored enough to know that you’ve got expired masks and rotted masks out there and not replenished, that is a real problem.”Sen. Cory Gardner of Colorado on Friday requested an investigation into the management of the supply and distribution of ventilators from the national stockpile. Among other issues, he cited reports that maintenance failures were contributing to the lack of working ventilators “at a time our country desperately needs them.”The CDC has acknowledged that some of the items in the U.S. stockpile have exceeded their manufacturer-designated shelf life but are continuing to be distributed due to the urgent demand.last_img read more

Wrestling juggernaut Sushil Kumar withdraws from Tokyo 2020 trials citing hand injury

first_imgImage Courtesy: HindustanAdvertisement 7sicjtNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs693jxWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Ec1( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 28nkWould you ever consider trying this?😱6rCan your students do this? 🌚45eRoller skating! Powered by Firework Wrestler Sushil Kumar, who is suffering a shoulder injury, has pulled out from the 74kg category trials for next month’s Asian Championships and the continental Olympic qualifiers in March. The trials are scheduled to be held in New Delhi on January 3rd, while the winners will compete in the year’s first ranking series in Rome from January 25-28.Advertisement Image Courtesy: Hindustan Times“I am not participating in trials as I am sustaining a minor fracture on my hand. I enjoy sports and only take part in any competition when I’m fully fit,” he said.One of India’s most decorated wrestler, Sushil Kumar, also submitted his medical certificate to the Wrestling Federation of India (WFI) stating his unavailability for the trials.Advertisement “I have sent a medical certificate to the federation and they will look at it and discuss that in the coming days. I will abide by the decision of the federation,” he added.However, a spokesperson of the WFI said that the committee will sit on Thursday to look into the matter of Sushil and will make a decision on him.Advertisement “Committee will sit today and take a call on Sushil Kumar,” the WFI spokesperson confirmed.Sushil Kumar, who won consecutive medals in the 2008 Beijing and 2012 London Olympic Games in the 66kg category, is trying to compete in the challenging 74 kg category for the first time in his career.There have also been some doubts over his future; following his early departure from the Asian Games and the World Championships, while 18-year-old Gaurav Baliyan is emerging to be a strong contender to take his place.But if the federation accepts Kumar’s request then the young Baliyan will have to wait for a shot at international glory.India picked up four Olympic quotas at the 2018 World Championships and will be eager to earn another spot in the 74kg, 97kg and 125kg categories at the Olympic qualification event in Xi’an, China.You might also like: Wrestler Deepak Punia clinches World number 1 ranking in 86Kg categorySports Minister Kiren Rijiju wants kabaddi to be included in 2024 Olympic Games Advertisementlast_img read more

Raised Houses Deterred Storm Damage

first_imgBy John Burton“I think we all breathed some sigh of relief when (Hurricane) Joaquin went off to the right,” heading of f into the Atlantic Ocean, Clean Ocean Action Executive Director Cindy Zipf said this week after assessing damage.Zipf was echoing many others who were planning for the worst, given reports that the hurricane could be barreling toward the Eastern Seaboard.Thankfully, it was not a hit but on the negative side areas prone to flooding once again showed our vulnerability; there was beach erosion and one storm-related death occurring in Colts Neck. But property damage was minimal, according to officials, thanks very much to the number of homes raised as a result of Super Storm Sandy. On the positive side, the rainfall over the of period of days last week went a long way to alleviating the water shortfall the county has had for months now.Tragically, Stacey Weathers, 46, Tinton Falls, was killed last Saturday, when the convertible Ford Mustang she was driving was hit by a falling tree along state Highway 34, near the intersection of Route 520. There was heavy rain and wind at approximately 4:25 p.m., when the incident occurred according to Colts Neck police.Weathers was the executive director of the state chapter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, and she was instrumental in the organization’s efforts raising $7 million for patients and support research.That was the only reported injury related to the severe weather, according to Monmouth County Sheriff Shaun Golden.“We were fortunate,” given we were spared the brunt of the hurricane, Golden said. “That was good news.“The bad news,” he continued, “any time we get these nor’easters,” given the county’s 27 miles of shoreline and 22 coastal towns, “It’s prone to flooding” and “it showed in the usual spots,” Golden said, such as Sea Bright and Highlands and other locations.Since Super Storm Sandy in October 2012, “We’re more sensitive to it. Residents in those areas know what to expect,” Golden observed, meaning they know to do things like move vehicles from low lying areas, as well as taking other steps.“We had a lot of flooding,” acknowledged C. ReadMurphy, Sea Bright Office of Emergency Management director. The ocean and river front Sea Bright had on some side streets, at their end, facing the Shrewsbury River, as much as 5 feet of flooding. On portions of Ocean Avenue/ Highway 36 there was 2 1⁄2 feet of water blocking the roadway. But emergency services were prepared and traffic continued to move without disruption, Murphy said.“It was nice and quiet,” he said. “It was as good as flooding can be.”One interesting point, Murphy noted, given the number of homes elevated when rebuilt after being damaged and destroyed by Sandy, the structures were spared the effects of this flooding. “No houses took on water,” he said.Highlands had localized flooding in the traditional area, in the low-lying areas off of Bay Avenue, explained Tim Hill, Highlands administrator, as well as some tree damage. “It’s hard to gauge overall beach erosion,” on the narrow bay front beaches available in the borough, Hill said, “but we don’t think the beaches were severely impacted,” and there was “no significant damage to any municipal property.”“We were prepared,” Hill said. “Thank goodness we didn’t need it.”The hurricane hung around the Caribbean islands before turning east in the Atlantic Ocean sparing the U.S. Eastern Seaboard. And the weather we experienced for much of last week, with heavy rain and strong winds, wasn’t really a nor’easter, according to David Robinson, New Jersey State Climatologist, at Rutgers University.“It was a very complex situation,” involving the colliding of a persistent cold front and its low pressure “bringing a long fetch of moisture,” and rain and high-pressure front, along with some strong onshore winds. “We were squeezed between the two systems,” from about late Tuesday/early Wednesday until Saturday, coupling with it higher than normal high tides – as much as 2 feet higher, Robinson said.This weather formation resulted in as much as 5.47 inches of rain falling over that period in portions of Monmouth County. And that, Robinson pointed out, is “the bulk of a month’s precipitation,” for the area and the only rainfall we’ve had in more than three weeks.“That gets us a good ways toward replenishing some of the ground water,” which had been depleted by the dry spell, he said.That’s the good news. “The bad news is the beaches took a pounding,” with the high tides and winds eroding shorefronts, he explained.“The worrisome part of that is we have the winter storm season ahead,” said Robinson, and any buffer that the beachfronts may have had for an added bit of protection for between November and March and April storms, is now virtually gone. “And that makes the coast more vulnerable,” he warned.Robinson told of weather predictions for an El Nino weather patterns for the Pacific Ocean. That traditionally results in a more active and severe storm activity for New Jersey. “No guarantee but that’s what’s been known to happen,” he said.“With every storm we’re reminded again and again about sea level rise and the reality of what happens when Mother Nature kicks up our heals,” Zipf observed. “We’re playing touch and go and praying for good weather and that’s no way to conduct public policy for creating sustainable communities.”Robinson agreed and in any face-off “Ultimately, the odds are going to continue to tilt in Mother Nature’s favor.”last_img read more