New investment cycle of the Blue Lagoon

first_imgLaguna Poreč also opened the fourth pool in the auto camp Bijela uvala, which makes this camp unique in Croatia with as many as four pools for the comfort of its visitors.Camp Bijela Uvala (Zelena laguna, 52440 Poreč, 52440, Poreč) is located on the Istrian peninsula, 5 km from Poreč, and is recognized as one of the best Croatian camps. The camp is categorized with four stars and is a proud winner of the prestigious ADAC award for quality “yellow board”. The camp area is 450.000 square meters, with a capacity of 6.000 guests. The camp has accommodation on 1.200 camping pitches, mostly between 70 and 110 mXNUMX, as well as accommodation in mobile homes.In addition to the new swimming pools, this year’s investment cycle also includes the refurbishment of 11 villas in the Laguna Bellevue tourist resort and the expansion of the terraces and landscaping of the park in front of the 27 terraces of the ground floor apartments.The total capital investments of the company Plava laguna in the destination Poreč in 2017 amount to HRK 94,9 million. Part of the investment relates to the construction and arrangement of exemplary accommodation units of hotels, villas, apartments and villages of the Laguna Park Hotel in preparation for a thorough future reconstruction, and significant funds have been invested in improving the quality of content in camps. This year, the interior of the common areas of Hotel Zorna was decorated, and Hotel Delfin received 124 newly renovated bathrooms, which arranged all 800 bathrooms in this hotel.last_img read more

Large gathering for Tragically Hip singalong tribute to Gord Downie in Toronto

first_imgTORONTO – Daveed Goldman and Nobu Adilman wanted to pay tribute to Tragically Hip frontman Gord Downie after learning of his death last week.And so the directors of Choir! Choir! Choir!, a Toronto-based singalong collective, invited fans to Nathan Phillips Square on Tuesday night to honour Downie the best way they could — through his music.“When we lose some of the great ones, if we can provide a space where people can come together and share the music and feel connected in a difficult time, then we’ll do it,” Adilman said. “It just felt like the right thing to do and I feel like these tributes are happening all over the country and big or small, they all matter.”Downie died last Tuesday at age 53. Nearly two years ago, he was diagnosed with glioblastoma, an invasive brain tumour with one of the poorest survival rates of any cancer.More than a thousand people gathered to sing about a dozen songs from the Hip as their tribute to the legendary Canadian band.People braved the brisk, windy, 10 C weather to belt out songs such as “Wheat Kings,” “Bobcaygeon” and “Courage.” Downie’s “The Stranger,” off his solo album “Secret Path,” was also played.People arrived clad in stylish suit jackets and hats similar to the ones Downie wore on the Hip’s “Man Machine Poem” tour in 2016. There were also fans sporting hockey jerseys bearing the Hip’s name.Parents put kids on their shoulders so they could get a better view, while others lit candles in honour of the late musician.Downie’s older brother, Mike, made an appearance on stage near the end of the set to thank those in attendance, which was met with a rousing applause from the crowd.“I have to say that over the last week, the outpouring of emotion, grief and love has been overwhelming,” Mike said. “And my family and I have felt it and it’s made things easier and it’s made things harder.“Made it easier because you showed how much you loved our brother and harder because we realized how many people were hurting and how many people were really affected by this.”Mike Downie also took the opportunity to talk about the “Secret Path” project, on which he collaborated with his brother. Choir! Choir! Choir! had asked that those in attendance to make a minimum donation of $5 to the Gord Downie and Chanie Wenjack Fund.Mike said that “it’s up to all of us” to help the reconciliation efforts.“I don’t think the government can fix it, I don’t think there’s a program big enough to fix it, I think it’s going to take everybody doing their part,” he said.“We think we’re a young country, but we’re not. We think we’re 150 years old, but we’re not. If we tried a little harder, if we brought in the Indigenous people that have been here for 12,000 years, we could be something so much different. And we would be better for it and I think we would be the envy of the world.”Choir! Choir! Choir! capped off the show with some audience members onstage to sing “Ahead by a Century.”“Gord Downie has meant so much to this country, he’s given so much and we just wanted to celebrate him and his music,” Adilman said.—Follow @RyanBMcKenna on Twitterlast_img read more