Sports Briefs

first_imgPakistan beat West Indies for T20 series win DUBAI, UAE (CMC): West Indies suffered their second batting meltdown in the space of 48 hours as they slumped to a 16-run defeat to Pakistan in the second Twenty20 International here yesterday to meekly surrender the three-match series. Scores: Pakistan 160 for four off 20 overs (Sarfraz Ahmed 46 not out, Khalid Latif 40, Shoaib Malik 37; Samuel Badree 1-24). West Indies 144 for nine off 20 overs (Sunil Narine 39, Andre Fletcher 29; Sohail Tanvir 3-13, Hasan Ali 3-49). Cuba clip Under-17s Jamaica Under-17 footballers were clipped 1-0 by Cuba in the semi-finals of the Caribbean Football Union’s championship on Friday in Trinidad and Tobago. Brian Savigne netted the game’s only goal in the 59th minute. The Cubans and Haiti will meet in the decider today. The Haitians turned back Curacao 3-1 in the other semi-final. Jamaica and Curacao will clash in a third-place play-off. All four semi-finalists, along with best third-place finisher Suriname, qualified for next year’s CONCACAF final round.last_img read more

Draw ignites 2010 World Cup fever

first_img7 December 2009The 32 teams participating at next year’s Fifa World Cup™ finals discovered their fate on Friday evening when the Final Draw for South Africa 2010 took place in Cape Town.While South Africans learned that the host nation’s opening match at Soccer City, Johannesburg on 11 June would be played against Mexico, it was the Group D line-up which caused arguably the biggest stir.Germany, Australia, Serbia and Ghana will battle it out for two qualifying places for the Round of 16, meaning two nations with passionate support will depart the tournament early.There could be a high-profile casualty from Group G too, after Brazil, Korea DPR, Cote d’Ivoire, Portugal were drawn together.TV audience of 200-millionAn estimated global television audience of 200-million joined the 2 000 invited guests in the Draw hall in watching the colourful and entertaining ceremony unfold.With African sporting stars such as athlete Haile Gebreselassie, rugby player John Smit, cricketer Makhaya Ntini, and footballers Matthew Booth and Simphiwe Dludlu assisting with the Draw, along with England’s David Beckham, it was always going to be an exhilarating occasion, but the undoubted centrepiece came when the eight groups were revealed.An early highlight of the draw was the eye-catching encounter between England and USA, scheduled for 12 June, which evokes the Americans’ famous 1-0 win over their transatlantic cousins at Brazil 1950.Argentina, Nigeria and Greece will get the chance to revive their group rivalry from 1994, while the heavyweight collision between Portugal and Brazil on 25 June also has the feel of a derby. Group A: South Africa, Mexico, Uruguay, France Group B: Argentina, Nigeria, Korea Republic, Greece Group C: England, USA, Algeria, Slovenia Group D: Germany, Australia, Serbia, Ghana Group E: Netherlands, Denmark, Japan, Cameroon Group F: Italy, Paraguay, New Zealand, Slovakia Group G: Brazil, Korea DPR, Cote d’Ivoire, Portugal Group H: Spain, Switzerland, Honduras, Chile A night to rememberWith such an array of stars, the event dazzled from start to finish. After a welcome sequence from Lions Head, the mountain that provides Cape Town with such a dramatic backdrop, award-winning musician Johnny Clegg performed “Scatterlings of Africa”, a song made famous by the Academy Award-winning film Rain Main.Fittingly, the first speech of the night came from the man without whom a Fifa World Cup in South Africa would never have been possible: the country’s former president, Nelson Mandela.The 91-year-old, speaking in a special video message, urged his nation to make the most of their opportunity as tournament hosts. “We must strive for excellence in our hosting of the World Cup, while at the same time ensuring the event leaves a lasting benefit to all our people,” he said.Next it was time for two special presidents to take to the stage. Fifa President Sepp Blatter and South African President Jacob Zuma showed their excitement at both the Final Draw and the 2010 Fifa World Cup itself in an entertaining dialogue lasting several minutes.Giancarlo Abete, President of the Italian Football Federation, then handed over the holders’ Fifa World Cup Trophy to Blatter, confirmation that sport’s holy grail is in South Africa and ready to be contested next year.Legendary Portugal striker Eusebio, born in neighbouring Mozambique, was introduced to the crowd before examples of the “Win in Africa, With Africa” campaign were showcased before an expectant audience. Beninese singer-songwriter Angelique Kidjo duly took to the stage to perform her Grammy-nominated song “Agolo”.JabulaniThe first duty of the show’s guest presenter, Academy Award-winning actress, Hollywood producer and proud South African Charlize Theron, was to show off the official 2010 match ball, adidas’s Jabulani, a name meaning “to celebrate” in Zulu.The multiple Grammy Award-winning Soweto Gospel Choir continued the theme of happiness with a lively rendition of “Pata Pata” before the arrival of Draw master and Fifa secretary-general Jerome Valcke signalled the moment of truth.Some of the assembled coaches will have headed away feeling confident; others concerned by the task presented here; yet at least all now know what lies in store as they begin their planning and preparation for next year’s showpiece.Source: Fifa.comlast_img read more

Bafana, Mexico in thrilling opener

first_img12 June 2010South Africa’s national team raised their game in the opening match of the 2010 Fifa World Cup on Friday, holding a Mexican side placed far above them in the international rankings to an enthralling 1-1 draw – with Siphiwe Tshabalala unleashing a blistering shot to score the first goal of the tournament.South Africans around the country went into a frenzy when Bafana Bafana opened the scoring in the second half at Johannesburg’s Soccer City Stadium – only to have their hearts ripped out when the Mexicans equalised with 10 minutes to go in the match.Confidence will grow: ParreiraBafana Bafana coach Carlos Alberto Parreira believes the national squad will be more confident in their remaining group A matches, having navigated the nerve-wracking opening match without loss.“The first game is always a lot of pressure for both teams,” Pareirra said after the match. Both teams tried to win, and I believe in the next game the team will be more confident.While both teams started cautiously on Friday, Mexican strikers Paul Aguilar and Giovani Dos Santos caused problems for the Bafana defence, prompting some great saves from Itumeleng Khune.The Mexican players denied Bafana space on the field, closing down the link between Steven Pienaar, Siphiwe Tshabalala and Teko Modise. When Bafana did get attacking opportunities, Modise gave the ball away too easily.Shortly after Bafana striker Katlego Mphela narrowly missed a beautiful cross from Tshabalala, Mexico netted from a corner-kick, but were ruled off-side.Second half comes aliveIn the second half, Parreira replaced Lucas Thwala, who was struggling to close down Dos Santos, with Tsepo Masilela.In the 54th minute, Bafana Bafana caught the Mexicans on the counter, Teko Modise giving Tshabalala a beautiful pass. “Shabba” did not disappoint as he made a good run from an acute angle before unleashing a rocket into the far corner of the net to put his side on the lead.Bafana Bafana were all over the Mexicans after that, and should have scored two more goals, Modise having two opportunities with only the goal keeper to beat.In the 79th minute, Rafael Marquez equalised as Bafana’s concentration seemed to lapse, Tsepo Masilela leaving the Barcelona defender unmarked.Four minutes before the final whistle, it looked like Katlego Mphela was going to put Bafana in the lead again, but his shot hit the side-bar.We couldn’t have scripted it better: JordaanDanny Jordaan, CEO of the 2010 Local Organising Committee, was full of praise for “the incredible atmosphere and spectacular football” during the opening match, played in front of 84 490 fans.“We could not have asked for more: a capacity stadium, a host nation with a will to win, an incredible atmosphere, and spectacular football,” Jordaan said.“It is just fantastic that the first goal of Africa’s first World Cup went to South Africa, we really couldn’t have written a better script.“Today we have established a template for every city and every town across South Africa to celebrate this World Cup. All of South Africa can be proud of what we have done in front of [a global television audience of] 500-million people.”Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

UN launches Mandela Rules for prisoners

first_img12 October 2015The United Nations has launched the Nelson Mandela Rules, a guideline to protect the rights of detainees.Secretary-general Ban Ki-moon welcomed the Revised Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners, describing it as “a great step forward”, on 7 October.The United Nations Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice adopted the crucial revisions of the 60-year-old international standards on treatment of prisoners at a meeting on 22 May in Vienna, in Austria. Now the Mandela Rules have been adopted by the UN General Assembly, which has published them.The @UN has launched “#NelsonMandela Rules’ on improving treatment of prisoners http://t.co/umAMhDuzo8pic.twitter.com/x75snGO5DL— NelsonMandela (@NelsonMandela)October 9, 2015UN General Assembly president Mogens Lykketoft recalled the spirit of Mandela. “It is said that no one truly knows a nation until one has been inside its jails,” he quoted. “A nation should not be judged by how it treats its highest citizens, but its lowest ones.”Lykketoft said that nations had failed to protect the human rights of prisoners. Too often, the driving principle behind prisoner treatment had been to see these individuals as entirely separate from communities and societies.“Hidden from our gaze, and indeed sometimes before our very eyes, prisoners have suffered abuse and mistreatment.”The basic outlineThe Mandela Rules “outlines that there shall be no discrimination; that the religious beliefs and moral precepts of prisoners shall be respected; and that legal representation and protection are mandated in regard to vulnerable groups within the prison populations”, reads the UN website.Ivan Šimonović, assistant secretary-general for human rights, said the revised rules were much more specific on matters such as defining the scope on solitary confinement and first-time guidance on intrusive searches, including strip and body cavity searches.But implementation could be a challenge, said Lykketoft. “The crucial challenge for member states will be to translate these rules into a reality and to increase co-operation both within and outside the UN system to improve the lives of prisoners throughout the world.”Šimonović added: “That is what Mr Mandela would have expected from us.”South Africa chaired the expert group in the revision of the Standard Minimum Rules.The Mandela Rules now contain an expanded section of basic principles, including the absolute prohibition of torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. The independence of health care staff is assured, and extensive restrictions are placed on disciplinary measures, including the prohibition of solitary confinement beyond 15 days.Clear and detailed instructions are provided on issues such as cell and body searches, registration and record keeping, investigations into deaths and complaints of torture and other ill-treatment, the needs of specific groups, independent inspections of prisons, the right to legal representation and more.Source: United Nationslast_img read more

Cooperative Relies on RFS Waivers

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Todd NeeleyDTN Staff ReporterOMAHA (DTN) — The farmer-owned CountryMark cooperative and fuel refinery is caught in the middle of the small-refinery exemption controversy.The company operates in Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Ohio and Kentucky — most of its customers at more than 100 retail stations are farmers and rural communities that have benefitted from the commodities markets bolstered by the Renewable Fuel Standard since 2005.It is — by EPA’s definition — a small refinery producing 75,000 barrels per day or less.In 2017 and 2018, CountryMark received small-refinery waivers to the RFS.It is one of the few refiners owned by farmers, and small-refinery waivers made CountryMark’s business more viable in 2017 and 2018.On the other hand, the refiner is a big supporter of the RFS. The company blends as much ethanol and biodiesel as possible and fulfills the rest of its legal obligation through buying biofuels credits.Kent Hoffman, an Indiana farmer and CountryMark board member, told DTN the refiner’s need for waivers started in 2015 when its bottom line took a hit when crude oil prices dropped. Yet costs to comply with the RFS continued to rise, he said.“In 2015 it was a huge loss for our refinery as crude oil prices collapsed,” Hoffman said.According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, lower crude oil prices led to a decline in U.S. production that began in the second quarter of 2015. By the end of 2015 prices dipped to below $40 a barrel — the lowest price since 2009.Click on the link to see the EIA price decline report: https://www.eia.gov/…The price of renewable identification numbers, or RINs, for all biofuels categories in 2015 remained mostly below $1 throughout the year. The highest price for any RIN in 2015 was $1.13 for a D3 cellulosic RIN on July 27, according to EPA’s database.Click this link to view EPA RIN trades and price information: https://www.epa.gov/…In 2016, the price of D3 RINs spiked to a high of $2.35 on Dec. 12, while the prices of other RINs ranged from 52 cents to $1.10 throughout the year.CountryMark’s RFS compliance costs ballooned to more than 350% of profits in 2016, Hoffman said.Refiner costs for natural gas to run the plant and maintenance was about $18.1 million, employee costs came in at around $20.4 million, he said.The costs to comply with the RFS, however, topped them all at about $22.9 million.“Over the next five years, we’re projecting $70 million for compliance costs,” Hoffman said.The refinery started as a gusher well discovered on farm ground in the southwestern tip of Indiana in the 1930s.The farmers who owned the newly discovered oil decided to cash in, so they built a 2,000 barrel-per-day refinery near Mount Vernon, Indiana. Today, it processes about 30,000 barrels per day.The CountryMark refinery brings to market about 450 million gallons of finished fuel products each year to farms, fleets and families. The refiner is owned and operated by CountryMark’s farmer cooperatives.WAIVERS NECESSARYMatt Smorch, CountryMark vice president of refining and logistics, said the process to apply for a waiver isn’t easy but sometimes necessary. The EPA asks companies for a lot of detailed financial information, so a waiver isn’t granted automatically.Because CountryMark has received waivers retroactively, he said the company is allowed to un-retire RINs it has on hand, even though it met its RFS obligation through blending and buying RINs throughout the year. Un-retiring RINs, he said, has led to more RINs flooding the market. That has created lower demand and lower prices for RINs.When it comes to CountryMark’s un-retired RINs in 2018, however, Smorch said the law allows the company to use just 20% of those credits for 2019 compliance.Since RINs prices have fallen, the company may not be petitioning EPA for a 2019 waiver.“Depending on how the rest of the year comes in and where the markets are at, and if our RFS compliance costs are not very high, with the way everything is this year we probably won’t apply for an exemption,” Smorch said.“It wouldn’t pass the red-face test.”The company supports the RFS because it understands its importance to the rural economy and its cooperative members, he said.“We’re a farmer-owned cooperative so we blend as much in our products that we can, and we incent our members to blend,” Smorch said. “Even with everything we do through blending, we are still short.”The company blends 60% to 65% of its obligation and fills the rest through RINs purchases.“We have to go out and buy credits,” Smorch said. “Typically we buy biodiesel and sell it at the diesel price. That’s part of our cost. We don’t own retail. We have branded stations but we don’t own them. With the way the RFS is set up today, mandates are so high that it’s hard to meet in the marketplace. If we fall short of blending, the waivers are a fallback.“Is applying for an exemption something we will do every year? Probably not. It really is there for a safety valve. We’re very supportive of the RFS. We’re in rural Indiana, our refinery is in the southwest part of the state. This is what saving rural jobs looks like.”BIOFUELS DEMANDEthanol and biodiesel interests contend 85 waivers granted by the EPA has destroyed biofuels demand to the tune of about 4 billion gallons since 2016.President Donald Trump reportedly is ready to make a peace offering to farm country at some point, to alleviate the sting felt in rural America where agriculture interests have doubts about where the president stands on the RFS.Smorch said he is unconvinced small-refinery waivers have led to reduced demand for biofuels, especially since the exemptions were granted retroactively.That’s because, as an example, CountryMark already blended as much biofuels as it could and bought RINs throughout the year to comply with the RFS. The company would like to blend more but doesn’t have the ability.If CountryMark decided it was going to meet its RFS obligation only through blending, it would face the daunting task of having to blend ethanol at a blend rate of greater than 12% of all of its gasoline and sell all diesel fuel at greater than B5, or a 5% biodiesel blend.CountryMark, however, is expanding its fuel offering of E15 and continues to look for other biofuels opportunities.Hoffman said the ability to ask for waivers is important to CountryMark’s business.“It is critical to our survival,” he said.“Waivers have made a huge difference on our profitability.”Todd Neeley can be reached at todd.neeley@dtn.comFollow him Twitter @toddneeleyDTN(BAS/CZ)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more