Beardsleys leaving after 26 years with EHS

first_imgELLSWORTH — Every semester Andy Beardsley assigns his class “Romeo and Juliet,” he hears the same line from students:“There’s no such thing as love at first sight.”“Oh yeah?” The Ellsworth High School English teacher and legendary cross country coach will ask before playing a tape for the room full of teenagers. “Listen to this.”“I just met this girl,” begins a message Andy recorded of himself some three decades ago — the day he met his future wife. The voice of a smitten 19-year-old spends the next 10 minutes raving about her beauty and love of “Lord of the Rings.”This is placeholder textThis is placeholder text“She’s amazing,” Andy says in the recording. “And I’m going after her.”Five years later, Andy married the girl who his students now know as their science teacher, Andrea Beardsley. After 26 years of working together at EHS, Andy and Andrea are moving to Virginia to live closer to Andy’s brother, Scott.“We’d honestly thought about doing something different before,” Andrea says. “But this all is happening really fast.”A plan took shape in mid-May when Andy, 51, and Andrea, 49, attended Scott’s graduation ceremony at the University of Pennsylvania. He had just earned his Ph.D. in educational leadership.“Andy and Scott are very close,” Andrea says. “For their entire adult lives, they’ve lived on different continents.”Scott, who is just 10 months older than Andy, is in the process of moving from Belgium, where he worked for a management consulting firm in Brussels. He will begin his new job as dean of the University of Virginia Darden School of Business in August.“Scott is really good at making people push themselves,” Andrea says. “During our trip, he asked us, ‘Why don’t you do something different? We can make this big life change together.’“That’s what got us thinking.”Two months later, Andy and Andrea have committed to the move. They are leaving July 28.The couple sit at their kitchen counter in their Ellsworth home, poring over photo albums and sharing memories. Andrea points to a picture, taken of the two shortly after they began dating, in which Andy is holding a novel. “That’s a Tolkien book,” she says.When asked what they’ll miss most about Ellsworth, Andrea’s eyes turn red.“Are you going to cry?” Andy teases her.“No, shut up,” Andrea smiles, looking up to keep tears from falling. “I can’t help it. It is sad! It’s a happy-sad thing.”Andy and Andrea’s journey to Ellsworth began in 1983 before they had even met. Though they both had family roots in Blue Hill, Andy moved away in middle school, and Andrea arrived in 10th grade. She graduated from George Stevens Academy.Their paths crossed at Bates College in Lewiston when Andrea caught pneumonia her first month there.“I was stupid as a freshman,” Andrea says. “I ate donuts and didn’t sleep. I got horribly sick.”Meanwhile, in Blue Hill, Andrea’s mom expressed concern over her daughter’s health to a good friend, Andy’s grandmother. Andy, a sophomore at Bates, consequently received instruction from his grandma to check on Andrea.“OK, Nana,” Andy says he responded. “I’ll go meet this girl.”Andy knocked on Andrea’s dorm room door and was greeted by a tall, intimidating man with his arms crossed. It was Parents Weekend, and that was her dad. Andy slinked past him to meet Andrea.Small talk between the two about where they each grew up quickly uncovered one major connection: Andy and Andrea both had lived in the same house in Blue Hill.Andrea doesn’t have a recording of her thoughts the day she met Andy, but she does have a mental image of him walking out of her room.“He had a little brown cap on, and he was limping because he had hurt himself,” she says. “While watching him walk away, I remember specifically thinking, ‘I’m now at the age where I am meeting people I could end up marrying.“‘I could end up marrying that guy.’”Andy and Andrea have five children, two of whom they adopted six and a half years ago from Ethiopia. They have taught their oldest sons and watched them both graduate from EHS.“Andy and I actually don’t see each other that much at school,” Andrea says. “We run in different circles.”Their days overlap through their students. Andrea says kids will often tell her, “Mr. Beardsley told a story about you today.” Or Andrea will occasionally use Andy as an example in her anatomy class to perhaps explain the cardiac output of a runner.“We share common students, and that’s how we interact,” Andrea says. “One of the main things we try to establish is a rapport with the kids. I think in that way, we have similar teaching styles.”Andy and Andrea fell in love with each other, as well as with teaching, over their three years taking education courses together at Bates.Andy, a year older than Andrea, graduated in 1986 and entered graduate school at the University of Maine-Orono while Andrea finished up her last year at Bates. Andrea then worked in Portland as a teacher at Deering High School until Andy earned his master’s degree.With their education behind them, their lives together could finally begin. They moved to Ellsworth in 1988 after Andrea accepted a teaching job at EHS. Andy applied to five different high schools in Hancock County, all of which didn’t hire him.To get by, the newlyweds worked at the Colonial Motor Lodge. Andrea served as a receptionist nights and weekends while Andy cleaned rooms full time.Andrea recalls one particularly busy night when a woman checking out of the hotel offered her some advice:“‘Dear,’” Andrea mimics the visitor. “‘You seem like a very intelligent young woman. Why don’t you continue your education so you can do something beyond this?’”“Actually, I’m a teacher,” Andrea replied, adding she had earned her bachelor’s degree from a small, selective liberal arts college.The woman persisted: “‘Well, uh, maybe if you had an advanced degree…’”“My husband has his master’s,” Andrea cut her off. “He’s cleaning toilets down the hall.”A position opened up at EHS in 1989 when a group of young, newly hired teachers, including Andrea, couldn’t handle the oversized population of problematic students.“We’re talking at least 10 boys who were 17 years old, physically violent and still freshmen in high school,” Andy says.Andrea — the veteran teacher of the bunch with one year of experience — met with staff members to find a solution.“So they hired Andy to be the muscle,” Andrea says, laughing, while Andy pretends to flex his arms. “Which, to anybody who knows him, is extremely funny because he’s the sweetest, most compassionate person.“He would just stand at the back of the room looking big and scary.”Later in the school year, the EHS head of the English department took a leave of absence, and Andy filled the position. Then, he never left.“It’s funny how things happen for the best,” Andy says. “When you get rejected or something bad happens, and you’re all upset about it. Then, you end up thinking, ‘I’m really glad that didn’t happen.’“If I had been accepted at one of those other schools, my whole career path would have been different.”Two and a half decades later and the job search was back on.After returning from their trip to Pennsylvania in late-May, Andy and Andrea began applying to schools in the Charlottesville area. Andrea — Hancock County’s 2014 Teacher of the Year — scored a position as a chemistry teacher at Albemarle High School within days of beginning her search.“I have a very positive reputation here at Ellsworth,” Andrea says. “From a professional point of view, I want to challenge myself to start fresh and see if I can develop that same reputation later in my career.”The Beardsleys emphasize repeatedly that their decision to leave has nothing to do with Ellsworth.“We feel blessed to have been able to teach in the Ellsworth school system,” Andrea says. “It’s an amazing system.”Alone in his classroom in late June, Andy packed up photos and awards accrued over his 26 years coaching cross country and track at EHS. A gifted athlete himself, Andy has coached some of Maine’s greatest runners, including Louie and Joey Luchini, Steve and Corey DeWitt, Ben Shorey, and, most recently, Aleta Looker and his nephew Dan Curts — all of whom went on to compete on a national stage.“I just feel really lucky to have had so many outstanding runners,” Andy says.Andy and Andrea had only just begun informing friends and family of their decision to move. They had quit their jobs and bought a house in a Charlottesville neighborhood centrally located so their kids can walk to school.Everything had just about fallen into place.It took Andy nine hours to clean out his classroom. Surrounded by bare walls and stacks of memories, he received a text message late that afternoon. The principal of a private school he had applied to work for, St. Anne’s Belfield School, wanted to interview him for an English teaching position.Andy got the job the next day. He will also serve as assistant coach of the school’s cross country and track teams with head coach Sintayehu Taye, who, coincidentally, was a star runner for Portland High School.“It’s scary, and it’s exciting,” Andy says. “I’m going to be a new teacher and a new coach where nobody knows me.”But the Beardsleys are not saying goodbye forever. They plan on returning to Ellsworth for two months every summer.“We’re not selling the house,” Andrea says. “We want this to still feel like home.”Andy and Andrea Beardsley are hosting a gathering before they leave at their home Thursday, July 23, from 4 to 7 p.m. Call 667-7128 for more information. Bio Latest Posts Taylor VorthermsSports Editor at The Ellsworth AmericanTaylor Vortherms covers sports in Hancock County. The St. Louis, Missouri native recently graduated from the Missouri School of Journalism and joined The Ellsworth American in 2013. Latest posts by Taylor Vortherms (see all)center_img Part 2: When the injury is inside your head, some “don’t get it” – July 26, 2016 Part 1: Invisible, incapacitating concussions are sidelining high school athletes – July 19, 2016 EHS names new boys’ soccer coach – July 13, 2016last_img read more

Unbeaten Auburn visits Mississippi St. to open SEC schedule

first_img Written By WATCH US LIVE Associated Press Television News COMMENT SUBSCRIBE TO US First Published: 3rd January, 2020 17:33 ISTcenter_img Here are a few things to watch in Southeastern Conference basketball as league competition opens this week:GAME OF THE WEEKENDLOOKING AHEADCan LSU and Tennessee bounce back?: LSU is the defending SEC regular-season champion and Tennessee owned the nation’s No. 1 ranking for nearly a month last season, but both teams are struggling a bit as they prepare to meet Saturday in Knoxville. Tennessee (8-4) has dropped three of its last four games andNUMBERS GAMEAuburn is one of only two unbeaten Division I teams along with No. 13 San Diego State (14-0). … SEC teams have gone 8-3 in head-to-head matchups with the Atlantic Coast Conference but have a combined 9-16 record against the Big East, Big Ten, Big 12 and Pac-12. … Kentucky’s Ashton Hagans has recorded at least six assists in nine straight games. He has an SEC-leading 7.3 assists per game. … After winning 31 straight home games, Tennessee has dropped two of its last three at Thompson-Boling Arena. … The SEC’s only Top 25 teams are Auburn and No. 17 Kentucky. … The SEC had five teams in the top 50 of theIMPACT PERFORMERGeorgia’s Anthony Edwards was rated as the nation’s No. 2 prospect in his class, according to composite rankings of recruiting sites, and the 6-foot-5 guard has lived up to that considerable billing thus far. Edwards ranks second in the SEC in scoring (19.7), behind only Vanderbilt’s Aaron Nesmith (23.5). Edwards showed his ability to deliver in big games by scoring 37 points in a loss to No. 14 Michigan State. Edwards gets another chance to showcase his talents Saturday at No. 9 Memphis, when he matches up with the Tigers’ talent-laden freshman class.ON THE WOMEN’S SIDEThe SEC enters conference play with six teams in the Top 25: No. 4 South Carolina, No. 11 Texas A&M, No. 13 Kentucky, No. 15 Mississippi State, No. 20 Arkansas and No. 22 Tennessee. … Heading into Thursday’s games, Texas A&M’s Chennedy Carter ranked fifth among Division I players in scoring (22.8) and Auburn’s Unique Thompson was fifth in rebounding (12.2). Last Updated: 3rd January, 2020 17:33 IST Unbeaten Auburn Visits Mississippi St. To Open SEC Schedule Here are a few things to watch in Southeastern Conference basketball as league competition opens this week: LIVE TV FOLLOW USlast_img read more

Highlight Games inks new partnership with Microgame S.p.A

first_img Related Articles Highlight Games goes live with MaxBet June 26, 2020 Submit Highlight Games goes global with ComeOn deal June 19, 2020 StumbleUpon Share Highlight Games’ SOCCERBET goes live with Iforium July 29, 2020 Share London-based video virtual sports specialist Highlight Games has agreed to supply its virtual sports products to Microgame S.p.A after securing a new partnership with the Italian platform provider. The agreement will see Highlight Games offer its Soccerbet product featuring Italian and English games in league and single match formats, as well as the NBA Last 60 across Microgame’s retail, online and mobile channels.Soccerbet is currently available with Italian operators including GoldBet, Sisal, Lottomatica, Snaitech and Eurobet.Nick Gardiner, Co-CEO, Highlight Games, commented: “I’m delighted to announce this important deal with Microgame, which further strengthens Highlight Games’ position in the Italian virtual sports market. “The appetite for our exclusive games continues to grow globally, and I’m pleased to add Microgame to our expanding list of valued customers in Italy.”Marco Castaldo, CEO, Microgame S.p.A added: “I’m thrilled to be offering Highlight Games’ compelling video virtual sports content to our players. “Soccerbet has revolutionised the virtual sports market in Italy and we can’t wait to offer Soccerbet and NBA Last 60 to our customers’ online, retail and mobile players.”Earlier this year, Highlight Games secured a new agreement with Sisal Loterie Maroc to supply its Soccerbet single-match product to customers of the Moroccan National Lottery (SGLN) in over 700 retail locations across Morocco.last_img read more

MLB legend Rod Carew discusses ‘the gift of time’ and the 2018 Rose Parade

first_imgFor Mary and Ralf Reuland, the image of their son Konrad Reuland’s face appearing on this year’s Donate Life Rose Parade float is bittersweet.PreviousRhonda Carew and her husband Rod Carew adjacent to a Donate Life Float exhibit at Pasadena Hilton in Pasadena Friday December 29, 2017. Transplant recipient Carew will be among the floatÕs 17 riders. In December 2016 Carew received a heart and kidney transplant and these two organs helped him regain health after suffering a massive heart attack the prior year. His donor was former NFL tight end Konrad Reuland, who will be present on the float through one of 44 floragraphs honoring donors whose generous act gave others a second chance at life. (Photo by Walt Mancini/Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Former NFL Coach Sam Wyche and Rod Carew, sports legends, meeting at Pasadena Hilton Friday, December 29, 2017. They will be among the riders on the Donate Life Float at the 2018 Tournament of Roses Parade. sports legends. San Wyche received a donated heat and Rod Carew received a donated heart and kidney. (Photo by Walt Mancini/Pasadena Star-News/SCNG) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsDeceased NFL tight end Konrad Reuland, donated a heart and kidney to Baseball Hall of Famer Rod Carew, who will ride on the Donate Life float in the Rose Parade. Parents met Rod Carew at Pasadena Hilton Friday, December 29, 2017.Mary and Ralf Reuland adjacent to a photo of their deceased son, NFL tight end Konrad Reuland. Konrad Reuland donated a heart and kidney to Baseball Hall of Famer Rod Carew, who will ride on the Donate Life float in the Rose Parade. Parents met Rod Carew at Pasadena Hilton Friday, December 29, 2017. (Photo by Walt Mancini/Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Rhonda Carew and her husband Rod Carew adjacent to a Donate Life Float exhibit at Pasadena Hilton in Pasadena Friday December 29, 2017. Transplant recipient Carew will be among the floatÕs 17 riders. In December 2016 Carew received a heart and kidney transplant and these two organs helped him regain health after suffering a massive heart attack the prior year. His donor was former NFL tight end Konrad Reuland, who will be present on the float through one of 44 floragraphs honoring donors whose generous act gave others a second chance at life. (Photo by Walt Mancini/Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 4Rhonda Carew and her husband Rod Carew adjacent to a Donate Life Float exhibit at Pasadena Hilton in Pasadena Friday December 29, 2017. Transplant recipient Carew will be among the floatÕs 17 riders. In December 2016 Carew received a heart and kidney transplant and these two organs helped him regain health after suffering a massive heart attack the prior year. His donor was former NFL tight end Konrad Reuland, who will be present on the float through one of 44 floragraphs honoring donors whose generous act gave others a second chance at life. (Photo by Walt Mancini/Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)ExpandOn one hand, it’s a reminder that Konrad is gone. On the other hand, it’s an opportunity to remember his generosity — and inspire viewers worldwide to designate their organs for donation.“Coming to these bigger events, it’s not like a dream world, it’s reality, and it hits us emotionally,” said Ralf Reuland, of San Juan Capistrano. “By the same token, it’s a very wonderful thing he’s being recognized among other donors, and bringing awareness to organ donation with such a huge platform like the Rose Parade is a phenomenal thing.”This year’s Donate Life float’s theme is “The Gift of Time,” and that’s exactly the gift that Konrad Reuland gave about a year ago to baseball legend Rod Carew, who will ride on the float New Year’s Day. A football player at Mater Dei and Mission Viejo high schools, Stanford and the NFL, Konrad suffered a brain aneurysm at age 29 that claimed his life. Because he was a registered organ donor, his heart went to Carew. Carew said he’s feeling strong these days, and he attributes that to Konrad’s heart beating in his chest.“We’re always together, and we’re going to do good things together by spreading the word about organ and tissue donation,” Carew, 72, said.With his physical therapy assignment mostly done, Carew said he’d like to travel with his wife, Rhonda, and continue to use his name and presence to promote organ and tissue donation. The Carews said they hope to get either or both MLB and the NFL to officially support the Donate Life campaign.Carew also promotes heart health education via his “The Heart of 29” campaign in partnership with the American Heart Association. The campaign was named after Carew’s uniform number with the Minnesota Twins and California Angels, but it holds an even greater significance now because Konrad was 29 years old when he died.Carew and Konrad met about 15 years ago at a middle school basketball game in Rancho Santa Margarita. Carew’s son and Konrad’s younger brother were teammates, and at one point teenage Konrad went up to Carew to introduce himself and to say that one day he hoped to be a professional athlete like him. Mary Reuland told Carew later that Konrad was elated to have met him.For Carew, the gift of time has several meanings — in this case, many years after Carew showed Konrad kindness by spending a few moments with him, Konrad gave Carew the greatest gift any person can give to another, Carew said.Including Carew, a total of 75 people received organ and tissue donations from Konrad.“I believe in the saying that if you do good, good will come back to you,” Carew said. “I hope people can come back into the lives of others to help.”Those interested in becoming organ, eye or tissue donors can visit donatelife.net.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more