Slow wickets to test batsmen: Experts

first_imgSub-continent pitches have been known for favouring the batsmen and giving bowlers nightmares, but if the warm-up matches are any indication, the Test nations – barring India’s score of 360 for five against New Zealand on Wednesday – have found it tough to post big totals except when they have played against the minnows.Former and current Indian players believe that it will be the bowlers who will hold the key to this edition of the World Cup and selecting the right bowling combination will definitely give the captains a headache.Former left-arm spinner Maninder Singh, India’s highest wickettaker in the 1987 edition of the World Cup, feels it will not just be about the spinners.”Frankly, one can’t expect the ball to swing in the sub-continent as much as they do in Australia, England or South Africa. But the new Kookaburra ball will definitely swing in the first six or seven overs and the pacers have to ensure that they go all-out to impose pressure on the batsmen,” Maninder said.Their next role will be to get the ball to reverse-swing. In the modern era, all the top pacers have mastered the art of reverse swinging the ball. As a result, the spell from the 28th over to the 34th over will be crucial as the ball will definitely be reversing. This is where the Pakistan bowlers will turn up the heat. Umar Gul and Shoaib Akhtar can never be discounted when it comes to reversing the ball. Even Zaheer Khan has become more of a thinking bowler and he will definitely save up some energy to hurl the reverse-swinging yorkers in the death overs.advertisement”Although the Kookaburra ball doesn’t have a pronounced seam, the spinners will still come in handy as sub-continent wickets grip and turn even in ODIs. So, for me, bowlers will hold the advantage this time round and the batsmen will not have an easy ride – as expected by many.”Maninder also stressed on the importance of part-time bowlers. “The part-time bowlers will need to be used well. While all teams have gone in with specialist pacers and spinners, the part-timers will come into play in a big way as often we will see them being used to check the flow of runs in the middle-overs,” he said.Batting legend Rahul Dravid echoed Maninder’s sentiments saying it was India’s strong list of part-time bowlers that gave them the edge.”India have a well-balanced outfit with a number of spinning allrounders or part-timers. This gives us a big advantage,” he said.Although he was a top-class offspinner himself, Erapalli Prasanna feels the contribution of the pacers can’t be discounted especially on Indian pitches where reverseswing will come in to play.”The nature of the sub-continent pitches will be perennially slow, helping the spinners. But a lot will depend on the pacers as well in the first 10 overs. Also, getting the ball to reverse in the latter stages will be crucial. As far as India is concerned, the crucial factor for me is how Zaheer leads the pace attack in the powerplay and how the spinners and part-time bowlers bowl in the span between the 25th and 40th overs,” he said.Former Test opener Aakash Chopra feels contrary to popular belief, it is going to be the bowlers who will run the show.”The quality of bowling attack will be crucial. Since most teams will be looking to score heavily, it will be the teams that can restrict the opposition who will win the matches. Restriction will be the key,” he said.Former pacer Madan Lal too feels bowlers will hold the key on the slow and low sub-continent wickets. “If the bowlers use their brains and stick to a wicket-to-wicket line, it will be very difficult for the batsmen to score as the ball won’t be coming on to the bat easily. A restricting line can force the batsmen to hit out or get out. Scoring high in the powerplays will also be playing heavily on the batsmen’s mind,” he said.”I feel even the part-timers will be crucial to the success of the teams. Someone like a Chris Gayle will also be useful just like a Yuvraj or a Yusuf.”With Kevin Pietersen and Graeme Smith already criticising the slow nature of the wickets – making batting difficult – it isn’t a surprise that the bowlers will be instrumental to teams’ success in the Cup.last_img read more

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first_imgShareTweet Det Supt Ryan Henderson of the PSNI’s Public Protection Branch launch its Christmas domestic abuse campaignTHE PSNI has launched its annual domestic abuse Christmas campaign and its message to victims across Derry is clear: Don’t suffer in silence.Scheduled to run until mid-January, the aim of the campaign is to encourage the reporting of incidents and show victims they can take steps to stop it. “Unfortunately, however, we know over the Christmas period incidents of domestic abuse rise and when we look at the figures from last year’s campaign, which ran from 15 December until 16 January.“The highest level of incidents reported to police was on New Year’s Day when we received a total of 142 calls for help compared to 147 the previous year. “On Christmas Day 2017, there were 84 incidents reported to us compared to 96 from the previous year.“Looking at the overall statistics from 1 October 2017 until 30 September 2018 there were 31,008 domestic abuse incidents recorded; an increase of 1,582 (5.4 per cent) on the previous 12 months. “The figures are the highest of any 12-month period since PSNI started recording data in 2004/05.“These stark figures tell us more victims are finding the courage to pick up the phone and make a report, which is encouraging, but we must always remember behind each statistic is a victim. “What is also alarming is that we respond to an incident of domestic abuse every 17 minutes. “Unfortunately, many incidents of domestic abuse still go un-reported, but we hope this campaign will go some way towards changing that and will encourage anyone impacted by domestic abuse to report it to us. “Domestic abuse is a terrifying crime, which can have a long lasting impact and it can affect anyone, and often leaves victims feeling isolated and alone. “Our role is about prevention, protection and prosecution; to prevent further violence, to protect the victim, children and other vulnerable people and to facilitate the prosecution of offenders. We want anyone impacted by domestic abuse to know there is help out there.”In March of this year, the Department of Justice launched a new scheme – The Domestic Violence and Abuse Disclosure Scheme (DVADS) – aimed at helping to protect people from becoming a victim of domestic violence or abuse.It allows a person to make enquiries confidentially to police when they have concerns their partner has a history of abusive behaviour. This allows them to make an informed choice about an existing personal relationship. An application can also be made by a third party who knows them and has concerns.Since the introduction of the scheme on 26th March until 30 November, there were 177 applications submitted. Ten disclosures were made. Detective Superintendent Henderson from the Public Protection Branch said: “Previously, it would have been difficult for someone entering a new relationship to find out, or be aware if their new partner had any prior convictions for violence ordomestic abuse. “This scheme makes it possible for people to take that extra step if they are concerned to do what they can to protect themselves. “I want to encourage anyone suffering from domestic abuse to call their local police on the non-emergency 101 or, in an emergency, always call 999.“A 24-hour Domestic and Sexual Violence Helpline is available to anyone who has concerns about domestic or sexual violence, now or in the past on 0808 802 1414.”Additional information:Please see below link to report: Domestic Abuse Incidents and Crimes Recorded by the Police in Northern Ireland: Quarterly Update to 30 September 2018 (Published 29 November 2018)https://www.psni.police.uk/globalassets/inside-the-psni/our-statistics/domestic-abuse-statistics/2018-19/q2/_domestic-abuse-bulletin-sep-18.pdfVictims of domestic violence urged not to ‘suffer in silence’ this festive season was last modified: December 13th, 2018 by John2John2 Tags: DET SUPT RYAN HENDERSONdomestic abusePSNIPUBLIC PROTECTION BRANCHVictims of domestic violence urged not to ‘suffer in silence’ this festive season The campaign’s message is ‘If you feel like you’re walking on eggshells that’s domestic abuse’. It will be promoted via online advertising across Northern Ireland. Detective Superintendent Ryan Henderson, from the PSNI’s Public Protection Branch, said: “We want to remind people they do not have to suffer in silence; that they can come forward to report any incident of domestic abuse to police. “Domestic abuse doesn’t only occur at Christmas; it happens all year round. last_img read more