Transfer applications up slightly

first_imgThe USC Office of Admission has seen a small increase in the number of transfer applications received this year, though officials say the jump is not dramatic.According to Tim Brunold, director of undergraduate admission, the number of transfer applications is up about 3 to 5 percent.Brunold said the increase of California applicants is not drastically different than the overall increase in applications, though he suspects the slight increase can be attributed to the current turmoil in higher education.“It’s probably been a 200 application increase from California, which would be proportional to that overall increase,” Brunold said.With the recent budget cuts to California higher education, state community colleges and University of California schools have had to cut back on the number of courses offered to its students, raising a possible explanation for the increase in transfer applications.“I wouldn’t say that the increase has been dramatic,” Brunold said. “It’s not as if we are seeing a huge percentage increase from a certain type of school, but there definitely has been a reasonable size increase from the UCs. Last year we got about 400 from the UC system, and this year we have about 450 — an increase that is more than coincidental.”According to preliminary data, the quality of the transfer applicant pool has also stayed at a high level, a trend that the admission office said it sees every year.“We do ask for students to self-report what their GPA is, and that number is at the same high quality it has been in past years,” Brunold said. “Those patterns look similar, which is a very positive thing for us.”For Kevin Khakshouri, a junior majoring in policy, planning and development, his transfer from Santa Monica College to USC brought with it a change in work ethic.“You have to do a lot more reading; it’s basically more work,” Khakshouri said of his transition to USC. “I could get by without doing the reading, whereas at ’SC I can’t wait till the last minute. I have to stay consistent.”For USC, the recent transfer applicant pool is indicative of the increasing caliber of students looking to transfer.“Our transfer applicants are very high quality. Last year the average transfer had a 3.65 GPA. Every indication so far is that the quality has stayed the same. It certainly has not gone down,” Brunold said. “It’s getting to the point where the typical rate of transfer admission is similar to freshman admits.”last_img read more

Unemployment Numbers Decrease in Florida

first_imgLast week’s jobless numbers are lower than the previous week around the country, they are also much lower in Florida.More than three-million more Americans are out of work according to the Labor Department.According to today’s report, more than 3.1 million workers filed first-time claims for unemployment benefits last week. That’s half-a-million fewer than the previous week’s total. More than 33-million U.S. workers have lost their jobs over the past seven weeks. The biggest increases in claims were in Washington, Georgia, New York, Oregon, and Alabama. The sharpest decreases were in California, Florida, Connecticut, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania.Florida was most responsible for the big dip in unadjusted numbers, reporting about 260,000 fewer claims over the past week. Maryland reported a jump of 27,337.At the current pace, the week claims numbers should fall below 1 million by mid-June, according to Ian Shepherdson, chief economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics. “We’re very hopeful that June will see the beginnings of a rebound as states begin to reopen,” Shepherdson said.The layoffs associated with social distancing practices have wiped out all of the job gains the economy has seen since the recovery from the Great Recession.last_img read more

NJ Summer Flounder Season Hits a Snag

first_imgBy Jay Cook |Efforts to compromise on what New Jersey representatives believe are draconian recreational fishing regulations were sunk last week, meaning the summer flounder season could potentially be shut down in coming months.A vote by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) on May 22 denied the state’s proposal for changes to three tiers of regulations. They also found New Jersey to be noncompliant.For greater New Jersey waters, the state had proposed an 18-inch minimum, three-fish limit and a 104-day season for the summer flounder season, a 24 percent cut from 2016. That differs from the ASMFC’s Addendum XXVIII decision in February of a 19-inch minimum, three-fish limit and a 128-day season, which made for a 33 percent reduction.“We’re disappointed by the actions of ASMFC’s Summer Flounder, Scup and Black Sea Bass Committee,” said Bob Martin, commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), in a statement on May 22. “New Jersey firmly believes that we have passed regulations that meet the conservation equivalency of the Commission’s proposed quota limits.”Despite New Jersey not falling in line with the regional regulations, the summer flounder season still opened on May 25 and will end on Sept. 5.On May 18, Martin approved the 18-inch minimum, three-fish limit and 104-day season for New Jersey. In the Delaware Bay and its tributaries, there is a 17-inch minimum, three-fish limit and 104-day season. For shore fishing on Island Beach State Park, there is a 16-inch minimum, two-fish limit and 104-day season as well.“There was no support by other board members for the New Jersey proposal,” said Tina Berger, spokeswoman for the ASMFC.In February, the ASMFC voted to approve Option 5 of Addendum XXVIII, which was in response to findings that the summer flounder stocks were close to being unsustainably low.“Because (summer flounder) was in an overfishing status, the states and the federal government had to take action to end overfishing immediately,” Berger said.Berger also added that the ASMFC board unanimously found New Jersey to be non-compliant. If the state doesn’t administer the board-approved regulations – 19-inch minimum, three-fish limit and 128-day season – a letter will be sent to the Secretaries of Commerce and the Interior.Fishing boats in Atlantic Highlands Harbor. If New Jersey doesn’t fall back in line with regionalfishing regulations, some fear the summer flounder season may be shut down.A conference call set for June 1 at 9:30 a.m. for the ASMFC’s Interstate Fisheries Management Policy will consider a recommendation to find New Jersey non-compliant.If that department and the federal offices also find New Jersey to be non-compliant, Berger said, after a 30-day window “a moratorium for fishing of that fish species in that state’s waters” could be implemented.New Jersey’s main concern with the ASMFC guidelines were that the number of summer flounder throwbacks would increase due to the 19-inch limit. The state believes that practice is ultimately connected to more fish deaths.“There’s simply no way we can believe that is responsible management,” said Adam Nowalsky, a former charter boat captain, and one of three New Jersey commissioners on the ASMCF.Through its proposed plan, the state believes that lowering the size limit by one inch and shortening the season by 24 days would lessen the burden on recreational anglers and keep the summer flounder stocks healthy.Also tied into its proposal was a major education outreach program aimed at informing recreational salt water anglers – those who fish from head boats, charter boats, in the ocean surf and also shop at bait and tackle shops.Through the FishSmart program lead by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and guidelines from TakeMeFishing.org, the state laid out a plan to distribute brochures and videos to anglers across the state.It also called for the creation of 30-second radio spot PSA’s, New Jersey-based videos showing proper catch-and-release techniques, and blasting out information via social media.Martin said he looks forward to working with NOAA in efforts to create a more responsible fishing culture. In turn, he said, that would “help protect the stock without devastating a multi-billion-dollar industry here in New Jersey.”Though for those who are unsure about the 2017 summer flounder season, Nowalsky said recreational anglers have to become more educated about the situation.In the meantime, he said, “I encourage people to go out and have a good time and enjoy what they can for as long as they can.”This article was first published in the June 1-June 8, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

HEAVILY FAVORED SILENT BIRD WINS FIFTH IN A ROW AS HE TAKES $63,000 SANTA ANITA ALLOWANCE FEATURE BY A NECK UNDER PRAT; TRAINED BY GLATT, HE GETS FLAT MILE ON MUDDY TRACK IN 1:36.52

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (Jan. 6, 2017)–In his first try around two turns, heavily favored Silent Bird ran down longshot El Huerfano late to take Friday’s $63,000 Santa Anita allowance feature by a neck under Flavien Prat.  Trained by Mark Glatt, the 5-year-old horse by Summer Bird got a flat mile in 1:36.52.In hand under Prat around the Club House turn, Silent Bird raced a close fifth past the half mile pole and was on the move in high gear while caught four-wide turning for home, giving punters momentary pause as he veered toward the middle of the track while straightening for home.“He was a little green once he made the lead,” said Prat.  “Once we straightened away, he was fine.”The 3-5 favorite in a field of six older horses, Silent Bird paid $3.60, $2.80 and $2.40.Owned by Norman Stables, LLC, Silent Bird was a winner of the seven furlong Damascus Stakes here two starts back on Nov. 4, and he was a game allowance winner at the same distance on Dec. 1 at Del Mar.  He now has five wins from six starts and with the winner’s share of $37,800, he increased his earnings to $208,800.“I was a little concerned that with this being his first time going long, he might get a little keen, but it was the opposite of that,” said Glatt.  When asked what might be next for the streaking Silent Bird, Glatt responded, “We’ll look at the San Antonio (Grade II, 1 1/16 miles on Feb. 4).  With all the heavy hitters seemingly out of town…Hopefully, he comes back good and we’ll go from there.Sent from the gate by Victor Espinoza, El Huerfano dictated terms throughout through fractions of 23.14, 45.96, 1:10.52 and 1:23.40 and battled back gamely at the rail when challenged a furlong out to finish five lengths in front of Avanti Bello.Off at 6-1, El Huerfano paid $5.20 and $3.60.Ridden by Mario Gutierrez, Avanti Bello was off at 5-1 and paid $3.60 to show.First post time for a nine-race card on Saturday at Santa Anita is at 12:30 p.m.  Admission gates open at 10:30 a.m.last_img read more