Willow Bay named head of journalism school

first_imgJournalist Willow Bay was named the new director of the School of Journalism at the Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism on Wednesday morning.New directions · Journalist Willow Bay looks forward to taking on her new position as the new director of the School of Journalism. – Photo courtesy of Max Iger Bay, who will start her position in July, brings in a wide range of experience. Currently the senior editor of the Huffington Post and a special correspondent for Bloomberg TV, Bay additionally has been an author, producer, digital news editor and national broadcast and global television news anchor.“[Bay’s] prominent broadcast experience includes stints as co-anchor of ABC News’ Good Morning America/Sunday; co-anchor of CNN’s Moneyline News Hour; host, lead writer and producer of CNN’s long-form program Pinnacle; substitute anchor on NBC’s Early Today and other                                                       MSNBC/NBC programs; co-host of NBA Inside Stuff; and host, writer and executive producer of the Lifetime documentary Spotlight 25,” a press release released by USC stated.Bay, who has never worked in an academic setting before, said her new position at the Annenberg School will allow her to influence a new wave of young journalists.“I think Annenberg represents an extraordinary opportunity,” Bay said. “First, to educate and inspire a next generation of journalists, but also to bring into a world of practice, a new skill set and really new ways of covering stories that Annenberg students learn, and frankly that they are fluent in and well-versed in when they graduate.”Bay’s position as director will begin right before the grand opening of Wallis Annenberg Hall, something she is excited about.“It is a tremendous [occasion] for Annenberg to take an important role in a conversation, frankly a global conversation, about the future of journalism,” Bay said. “I think one of the key goals will be to settle in to the new Wallis Annenberg Hall and to fully leverage all of those technologies.”Bay originally began working as a model when she was 15 years old, but said that journalism was always her true passion.“I have always wanted to be a reporter ever since I was in high school, and that is actually, how I got into modeling,” Bay said. “I went for an internship at Seventeen Magazine. I started my career in a pursuit of a job in journalism!”Wallis Annenberg, chairman, president and CEO of the Annenberg Foundation and USC Board of Trustees member, expressed immense pride in Bay’s appointment.“I cannot think of a greater director for the USC Annenberg School of Journalism, or a greater model of what journalism can achieve in today’s world,” Annenberg said in the press release.Bay’s work spans over a diverse array of the media landscape, and she noted that it’s exactly that diversity that will allow her to stand out as the new director.“I have worked in so many sections of the industry, and it gives you a familiarity with the needs of those industries and I think that will help me hugely in Annenberg,” Bay said. “Hopefully, I can use that to the advantage, not just of the school, but of the students.”Ernest Wilson III, dean of the Annenberg school, predicts that Bay’s leadership will usher the school into the future.“We have a new building, a new program and a new era. I’m thrilled that Willow Bay will be here to provide new leadership for our School of Journalism,” Wilson said in the press release.last_img read more

Low scoring spree prompts upsets at the English amateur

first_imgImages copyright Leaderboard Photography Eagles and birdies were flying on an afternoon of upsets in the English men’s amateur championship at Formby which saw top seed Sam Rook and international Jake Burnage knocked out.Burnage (Saunton) chipped in for eagle on the 17th to go all square in his match. But his opponent, Oliver Farrell (Evesham) birdied the 18th to win the close-fought game 1up and take his place in the quarter finals.“Jake’s chip-in helped me a little bit,” said Farrell. “I told myself to respond in a good way and hit a great drive down the middle on 18. I had 99 yards left, which was perfect, I hit a 90-yard shot and let it release down to the pin to about 4ft away.”Burnage’s approach was almost as good, finishing 6ft away, but his birdie attempt lipped out.Farrell, 21, is a student at Marquette University in Wisconsin and is playing in the match play stages of this championship for the first time. “My game has been close all year,” he said. “Sometimes the results don’t reflect the way you are playing.”Tomorrow he will play Callum Farr (Northamptonshire County) who knocked out the top seed Sam Rook (Lindrick) 3/2.Farr was slow starting but once he got going, he was on fire. He lost the first to a birdie then, by his own account, made a mess of the second. After that he played the next 14 holes in six-under par, with birdies on 3, 4, 6, 8, 11 and 13.Farr, who celebrates his 20th birthday next week, is also playing in the match play stages for the first time and remarked: “It’s nice to beat the top seed, it shows you can beat anyone.”Brabazon Trophy winner Nick Poppleton joins them in the quarter finals, after defeating Jack Ainscough (Hartlepool) 3/2.Poppleton had a marathon match this morning, going to the 23rd hole to beat Matthew Nuttall (Royal Birkdale.) But the long game brought the added bonus of a fresh swing thought: “I found something in the play-off holes and started to hit some better shots.“I played lovely in the stroke play but I haven’t been swinging it as great in the match play or putting as great. But this afternoon I played nicely and played some lovely wedge shots”He took an early lead, winning the first three holes when Ainscough found sand off each of the tees, and he had his chances to get to four under. But, instead it was Ainscough who made a move, getting back to 2 down after 15, only for Poppleton to convert a lovely nine-iron approach on 16 into a winning birdie.Tomorrow Poppleton takes on Joe Long (Lansdown), who came through another marathon game. He finally beat Alex Dixon (City of Newcastle) on the 20th.Tom Thurloway (Chartham Park) moved confidently into the quarters with a 4/3 win over Hexham’s Matty Lamb. His opponent will be Angus Flanagan (St George’s Hill) who knocked out boy international Robin Williams (Peterborough Milton). Flanagan finished with a run of birdies: on the 15th to get to one up; on the 17th to halve the hole; and on the 18th to win 2up.The final quarter final will be between Jamie Li (Bath) and Alex Ireland (Brickhampton Court). Li was a 19th hole winner over England squad player Tom Sloman (Taunton & Pickeridge). Ireland meanwhile, won the 14th, 15th and 16th with a par, birdie, par sequence to defeat Rhys Lawrence (Coventry) 3/2.Burnage (Saunton) chipped in for eagle on the 17th to go all square in his match. But his opponent, Oliver Farrell (Evesham) birdied the 18th to win the close-fought game 1up and take his place in the quarter finals.“Jake’s chip-in helped me a little bit,” said Farrell. “I told myself to respond in a good way and hit a great drive down the middle on 18. I had 99 yards left, which was perfect, I hit a 90-yard shot and let it release down to the pin to about 4ft away.”Burnage’s approach was almost as good, finishing 6ft away, but his birdie attempt lipped out.Farrell, 21, is a student at Marquette University in Wisconsin and is playing in the match play stages of this championship for the first time. “Tomorrow he will play Callum Farr (Northamptonshire County) who knocked out the top seed Sam Rook (Lindrick) 3/2.Farr was slow starting but once he got going, he was on fire. He lost the first to a birdie then, by his own account, made a mess of the second. After that he played the next 14 holes in six-under par, with birdies on 3, 4, 6, 8, 11 and 13.Farr, who celebrates his 20th birthday next week, is also playing in the match play stages for the first time and remarked: “It’s nice to beat the top seed, it shows you can beat anyone.”Brabazon Trophy winner Nick Poppleton joins them in the quarter finals, after defeating Jack Ainscough (Hartlepool) 3/2.Poppleton had a marathon match this morning, going to the 23rd hole to beat Matthew Nuttall (Royal Birkdale.) But the long game brought the added bonus of a fresh swing thought: “I found something in the play-off holes and started to hit some better shots.“I played lovely in the stroke play but I haven’t been swinging it as great in the match play or putting as great. But this afternoon I played nicely and played some lovely wedge shots”He took an early lead, winning the first three holes when Ainscough found sand off each of the tees, and he had his chances to get to four under. But, instead it was Ainscough who made a move, getting back to 2 down after 15, only for Poppleton to convert a lovely nine-iron approach on 16 into a winning birdie.Tomorrow Poppleton takes on Joe Long (Lansdown), who came through another marathon game. He finally beat Alex Dixon (City of Newcastle) on the 20th.Tom Thurloway (Chartham Park) moved confidently into the quarters with a 4/3 win over Hexham’s Matty Lamb. His opponent will be Angus Flanagan (St George’s Hill) who knocked out boy international Robin Williams (Peterborough Milton). Flanagan finished with a run of birdies: on the 15th to get to one up; on the 17th to halve the hole; and on the 18th to win 2up.The final quarter final will be between Jamie Li (Bath) and Alex Ireland (Brickhampton Court). Li was a 19th hole winner over England squad player Tom Sloman (Taunton & Pickeridge). Ireland meanwhile, won the 14th, 15th and 16th with a par, birdie, par sequence to defeat Rhys Lawrence (Coventry) 3/2. 3 Aug 2018 Low scoring spree prompts upsets at the English amateur center_img Tags: Mens Amateurlast_img read more

Olympia Named a Top 100 Best Place to Live

first_imgFacebook195Tweet0Pin0Submitted by LiveabilityOlympia has been named one of the Top 100 Best Places to Live 2018 by Livability.com, outpacing more than 2,100 cities (with populations between 20,000 and 350,000) in this data-driven ranking.The list is an exclusive, independent, editorial ranking by Livability.com. The 2018 ranking builds on a process initially developed with one of the world’s leading urban theorists, Richard Florida. Livability.com’s research team worked with the University of Toronto’s Martin Prosperity Institute and later with The Initiative for Creativity and Innovation in Cities at New York University’s Schools of Professional Studies a program he directed along with Steven Pedigo.“The 2018 Best Place to Live list includes a fascinating mix of familiar cities and first-timers that are starting to carve out a reputation as wonderful places to live,” says Winona Dimeo-Ediger, Livability.com’s managing editor.“It’s great to see these under-the-radar cities getting more attention on a national scale — and the accolades are certainly well-deserved.”The capital of Washington, this modest-sized city offers vibrant culture, a charming downtown and a range of outdoor activities for residents. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge, Tumwater Falls Park and Wolf Haven International are just three of many natural attractions, and Puget Sound provides fantastic views, boating opportunities and great seafood. The economy of Olympia is strong in education, government, healthcare and manufacturing, and abundant neighborhoods offer a variety of housing options and architectural styles. Olympia also earns high livability marks for its abundance of parks as well as Evergreen State College with more than 60 fields of study. In addition, much of the local population is tuned-in to social causes.last_img read more

Raised Houses Deterred Storm Damage

first_imgBy John Burton“I think we all breathed some sigh of relief when (Hurricane) Joaquin went off to the right,” heading of f into the Atlantic Ocean, Clean Ocean Action Executive Director Cindy Zipf said this week after assessing damage.Zipf was echoing many others who were planning for the worst, given reports that the hurricane could be barreling toward the Eastern Seaboard.Thankfully, it was not a hit but on the negative side areas prone to flooding once again showed our vulnerability; there was beach erosion and one storm-related death occurring in Colts Neck. But property damage was minimal, according to officials, thanks very much to the number of homes raised as a result of Super Storm Sandy. On the positive side, the rainfall over the of period of days last week went a long way to alleviating the water shortfall the county has had for months now.Tragically, Stacey Weathers, 46, Tinton Falls, was killed last Saturday, when the convertible Ford Mustang she was driving was hit by a falling tree along state Highway 34, near the intersection of Route 520. There was heavy rain and wind at approximately 4:25 p.m., when the incident occurred according to Colts Neck police.Weathers was the executive director of the state chapter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, and she was instrumental in the organization’s efforts raising $7 million for patients and support research.That was the only reported injury related to the severe weather, according to Monmouth County Sheriff Shaun Golden.“We were fortunate,” given we were spared the brunt of the hurricane, Golden said. “That was good news.“The bad news,” he continued, “any time we get these nor’easters,” given the county’s 27 miles of shoreline and 22 coastal towns, “It’s prone to flooding” and “it showed in the usual spots,” Golden said, such as Sea Bright and Highlands and other locations.Since Super Storm Sandy in October 2012, “We’re more sensitive to it. Residents in those areas know what to expect,” Golden observed, meaning they know to do things like move vehicles from low lying areas, as well as taking other steps.“We had a lot of flooding,” acknowledged C. ReadMurphy, Sea Bright Office of Emergency Management director. The ocean and river front Sea Bright had on some side streets, at their end, facing the Shrewsbury River, as much as 5 feet of flooding. On portions of Ocean Avenue/ Highway 36 there was 2 1⁄2 feet of water blocking the roadway. But emergency services were prepared and traffic continued to move without disruption, Murphy said.“It was nice and quiet,” he said. “It was as good as flooding can be.”One interesting point, Murphy noted, given the number of homes elevated when rebuilt after being damaged and destroyed by Sandy, the structures were spared the effects of this flooding. “No houses took on water,” he said.Highlands had localized flooding in the traditional area, in the low-lying areas off of Bay Avenue, explained Tim Hill, Highlands administrator, as well as some tree damage. “It’s hard to gauge overall beach erosion,” on the narrow bay front beaches available in the borough, Hill said, “but we don’t think the beaches were severely impacted,” and there was “no significant damage to any municipal property.”“We were prepared,” Hill said. “Thank goodness we didn’t need it.”The hurricane hung around the Caribbean islands before turning east in the Atlantic Ocean sparing the U.S. Eastern Seaboard. And the weather we experienced for much of last week, with heavy rain and strong winds, wasn’t really a nor’easter, according to David Robinson, New Jersey State Climatologist, at Rutgers University.“It was a very complex situation,” involving the colliding of a persistent cold front and its low pressure “bringing a long fetch of moisture,” and rain and high-pressure front, along with some strong onshore winds. “We were squeezed between the two systems,” from about late Tuesday/early Wednesday until Saturday, coupling with it higher than normal high tides – as much as 2 feet higher, Robinson said.This weather formation resulted in as much as 5.47 inches of rain falling over that period in portions of Monmouth County. And that, Robinson pointed out, is “the bulk of a month’s precipitation,” for the area and the only rainfall we’ve had in more than three weeks.“That gets us a good ways toward replenishing some of the ground water,” which had been depleted by the dry spell, he said.That’s the good news. “The bad news is the beaches took a pounding,” with the high tides and winds eroding shorefronts, he explained.“The worrisome part of that is we have the winter storm season ahead,” said Robinson, and any buffer that the beachfronts may have had for an added bit of protection for between November and March and April storms, is now virtually gone. “And that makes the coast more vulnerable,” he warned.Robinson told of weather predictions for an El Nino weather patterns for the Pacific Ocean. That traditionally results in a more active and severe storm activity for New Jersey. “No guarantee but that’s what’s been known to happen,” he said.“With every storm we’re reminded again and again about sea level rise and the reality of what happens when Mother Nature kicks up our heals,” Zipf observed. “We’re playing touch and go and praying for good weather and that’s no way to conduct public policy for creating sustainable communities.”Robinson agreed and in any face-off “Ultimately, the odds are going to continue to tilt in Mother Nature’s favor.”last_img read more

Nelson Leafs support fight against Breast Cancer

first_imgThe Leafs welcomed Pal and her daughter snow the opportunity to drop the puck during the ceremonial faceoff to begin the game.There was also silent auctions as well as Nelson donated its share of the 50/50 draw to Pal’s fundraising cause.”I just want to say thank you so much to the Nelson Leafs (including) Sean Dooley and MJ Swetlikoe — for making this happen,” said evening organizer Steve Archdekin.Archdekin said Pal has a long way to go but knows everyone is behind her until she comes through the other end of this.“I am so grateful for the way so many people jump at the chance to help me with the things I have been doing,” Archdekin said.“It would be impossible without you. I have met some incredible people along the way to go with the endless inspiration I have found watching the dignity and grace with how G (Gelana) has been handling all of this. Really beautiful stuff.”The evening became complete when Nelson won the game in double overtime 3-2 on a goal by Ryan Piva. Fewer women are dying from breast cancer. But the number remains high, too high.Which is why the month of October has been designated across North America as Breast Cancer Awareness month by people wearing pink.Saturday, during the KIJHL game between the Leafs and Columbia Valley Rockies, the Heritage City franchise showcased the battle against a serious form of breast cancer by Galena Pal of Nelson.last_img read more