Latest avian flu cases may include one in Cambodia

first_imgJan 31, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Two Vietnamese girls died of avian influenza over the weekend, and the disease may have claimed its first human victim in Cambodia, according to news services.A 13-year-old girl and a 10-year-old girl became the 11th and 12th people to die of H5N1 avian flu in Vietnam since late December, according to reports. Their illnesses were first reported in the news media Jan 28.The 13-year-old girl, who lived in Dong Thap province in southern Vietnam, died early on Jan 29, according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) report. Her 35-year-old mother had died of avian flu Jan 21.AFP quoted state media reports as saying the girl and her mother had slaughtered an infected duck for a meal. Previous reports said the girl had fallen ill Jan 13 and been hospitalized Jan 20. The Associated Press (AP) said experts were still trying to determine if the two cases involved person-to-person transmission.The 10-year-old girl, who lived in the southern province of Long An, died yesterday, according to a Reuters report. China’s official news agency, Xinhua, quoted a physician at a hospital in Ho Chi Minh City as saying the girl had had contact with dead chickens.With the latest deaths, the apparent total of deaths caused by avian flu has increased to 44, including 32 in Vietnam and 12 in Thailand. The World Health Organization (WHO) said on Jan 28 it had received reports of the two girls’ cases, but it has not yet listed the cases as confirmed.The total number of human cases since late 2003 appears to be at least 57. That includes 27 cases reported in Vietnam before December 2004 and another 13 cases since then, for a total of 40. The 13 recent cases include a 42-year-old man from northern Vietnam who recovered and, according to Reuters, was released from a hospital Jan 28. Thailand has had 17 cases, including 12 fatal ones, but has not had a case since October 2004.(The latest WHO case count, updated Jan 26, listed a total of 54 human cases, including 41 deaths.)A 25-year-old Cambodian woman died yesterday in a southern Vietnam hospital with lung damage suspected to have been caused by avian flu, according to Reuters and AP reports.The woman’s family said she became ill after dead poultry were found in her village, the AP report said. Reuters quoted a physician named Nguyen Van Hung as saying that the case was worrisome because the woman’s brother had died of respiratory failure before he could be brought to a hospital.If the woman’s case is confirmed, she will be the first Cambodian known to have had H5N1 avian flu. Cambodia’s last H5N1 outbreak in poultry was in September 2004, according to records of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE).All serious cases of H5N1 avian flu since the disease re-emerged in late 2003 have been in Vietnam and Thailand, though evidence of a few mild or asymptomatic cases has been reported in Japan. The first known human cases of H5N1 occurred in Hong Kong in 1997, when 18 people fell ill and 6 of them died.Avian flu was also suspected to have killed a 39-year-old man who died yesterday in the central Vietnam city of Da Nang, according to a Reuters story citing a report in a Ho Chi Minh City newspaper. Test results were awaited, the story said.In addition, a Xinhua story said that seven people from northern Vietnam were admitted to the Topical Disease Institute in Hanoi on Jan 29 and 30 with avian flu symptoms. But the report didn’t identify the source of that information.In other developments, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week cautioned travelers to Vietnam to take steps to avoid avian flu. The “travel health precaution” warns travelers to avoid areas where live poultry are kept and to make sure foods containing poultry or eggs are thoroughly cooked, among other steps. A separate notice for travelers visiting family and friends in Vietnam listed more detailed measures.last_img read more

BLOG: Three Major Challenges Facing Older Cities and How We Can Help

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter May 10, 2016 BLOG: Three Major Challenges Facing Older Cities and How We Can Help Infrastructure,  Innovation,  The Blog Helping older cities address their challenges isn’t just a city challenge; it’s a commonwealth challenge. That’s because the challenges older cities face are challenges for all Pennsylvanians. All of us need our cities to succeed and flourish.Let me start with a little background. Up until a few years ago when I entered a career in politics, I was a business owner in York, PA. As a business owner in York, I had a big interest in seeing York succeed. I was involved in a number of York-centered civic organization. Most prominent among them was Better York, a CEO organization devoted to the revitalization of the city of York. The members represented different sectors of the economy, but we were united in the belief that our region could not survive a declining and decaying city at its heart. And that’s exactly what York was doing – declining.Like every other third class city in Pennsylvania, York was struggling. Its struggles looked a lot like the struggles other Pennsylvania cities were facing. But why was York struggling?The problems with urban areas stem from failures in the broader society in which those cities operate. First, cities are constantly assaulted by policies that hamstring them. Second, cities suffer from social imperfections. And finally, our older cities suffer from a lack of imagination.First of all, the public policy environment in a place like Pennsylvania is not at all kind to cities.One strong example of this is our public education system in Pennsylvania. It is an unfortunate truth that Pennsylvania’s public education system relies on local funding for its existence.This means that for the most part, education funding is most generous to America’s most prosperous communities and of course least generous to its least prosperous citizens. The greater your school’s challenges, the less funding we give you.The commonwealth ranks 45th in the nation in terms of the state’s share (%) of funding for basic education. This, combined with the small sizes of Pennsylvania’s school districts leads to very large fiscal disparities between school districts. Poorer school districts get far less than we need them to get. As a result, children in these poorer school districts get less of an education than we need them to get and as a result, the areas of concentrated poverty have schools with fewer resources and higher taxes.We could do a lot to level the tax playing field by making the funding of public education fairer. And we could accomplish this simply by having the commonwealth pick up a bigger share of the funding burden from the local levels. All local municipalities would benefit from this change. Cities would benefit the most.Second, social pathologies have harmed cities.There is a clear pattern of racial segregation in the sprawling pattern of metropolitan growth. For example, in 1990, the African American population of the York metro region was 2.9% of the total population and almost 82% of them live in the city of York.By almost any statistical measure, this made York one of the most segregated metro areas in the nation. As a consequence, to be poor and a person of color was very different than being poor and white in the York metro region. That’s because white poverty is evenly distributed throughout the region. Six out of seven poor white families send their kids to middle-class schools. By contrast two out of three African American and Hispanic children go to schools where the poverty rate is above 60%. This pattern does not appear to be random. Race does still play a role in shaping living and migration patterns in America. And it has led to patterns of metropolitan growth that has had a negative effect on the economies of cities.Finally, urban areas face a challenge of imagination.Too many Americans have come to feel that cities are a bad bet, a throwback to a different era. The goal of the typical American is to inhabit the suburban space. So pervasive is this idea that it has come to be regarded as fact. The form of the city remains relevant today.My wife and I rent an apartment in Philadelphia and it’s liberating that we can walk – not drive – out of our apartment and find a restaurant, supermarket, retail store, museum, theater, or a nice park within a short walk. No suburb offers that kind of convenience. Nor do most suburbs offer the diversity of population, experiences, or opportunity that most cities can offer.So what do we do to improve the lot of cities given these challenges?Here are my suggestions of policies we should consider:Regional land use planningZoning ordinances and planning codes that allow mixed use, high density communitiesUrban growth boundaries like Portland, OregonInclusive zoning like Montgomery County, MarylandChange public infrastructure investment strategy to promote redevelopment of old settlementsStrike a better balance between highway and mass transit fundingConsolidate and restore old industrial sites for redevelopmentReform local tax policies starting with the state taking a bigger share of funding for public educationIn the end, the struggle for our cities will depend on the outcome of the competition between suburbs and cities. The outcome will largely be determined by the extent to which that competition is a fair one.center_img By: Governor Tom Wolf Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolflast_img read more

Jane Louise Hinsky

first_imgJane Louise Hinsky, age 68 of Lawrenceburg, Indiana passed away on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 at Dearborn County Hospital.   The daughter of Ralph and Mary (nee: Curry) Behrman was born on February 28, 1949 in Columbus, IN.The 1967 Columbus North graduate worked for over 20 years as the Finance Director at New Horizons, and then later held the position of Finance Coordinator for Community Mental Health Care of Lawrenceburg.    In her spare time, Jane enjoyed playing and singing at her piano, traveling to Nascar races, camping, spending time with friends and family, and spoiling her grandkids.Jane will be dearly missed by Todd, her husband of 21 years; four daughters, Stephanie (Steve) Oswald of Powell, OH, Natalie (James) Carf of Rising Sun, IN, Jennifer (Aaron) Prickel of Indianapolis, IN and Lindsey (Jason) Nierman of Henryville, IN; grandchildren, Zachary & Caroline Oswald, Isaac, Claire & Elaine Prickel, and Lillian, Landon & Ella Nierman; along with her brothers John (Sharon) Behrman and Dennis (Carolyn) Behrman, both of Columbus, IN.Visitation will be Friday, February 16, 2018 from 5-8pm with 11:00am Funeral Service on Saturday, all at Meyers Funeral Home in Batesville.Memorials may be given to the Alzheimer’s Association c/o the funeral home. Online condolences www.meyersfuneralhomes.com.last_img read more

Tipp Minors aspiring towards Munster final spot

first_imgThe Premier County had twelve points to spare against the Déise men in last night’s opening round game at Semple Stadium running out 2-16 to 1-7.Tipp’s  goals came from Jack Delahunty and sub Brendan Martin.After defeat to Kerry in last year’s semi-final, manager Charlie McGeever says there’s an expectation within the team that they can go on to reach the decider this time around. Elsewhere, defending champions Kerry beat Clare by 14 points to 3 in Tralee and will now face Cork in the semi-finals.The Rebels were 2-15 to 2-7 winners over Limerick.Limerick face Waterford in Necastlewest next Wednesday, for the right to take on Clare in the second play-off with the winners of that facing Tipplast_img read more

Liverpool news: Loris Karius joins Besiktas on two-year loan

first_imgLiverpool goalkeeper Loris Karius has joined Besiktas on a two-year loan deal.The 25-year-old is set to spend the remainder of 2018/19 and the whole of 2019/20 with the Turkish side. Karius has made 49 appearances for the Reds since joining the club from Mainz in 2016, but infamously made two major errors in their Champions League final defeat to Real Madrid last season.Liverpool lost 3-1 with Karius deemed at fault for Los Blancos’ first and third goals, though it was later stated that he suffered from concussion as a result of an earlier collision. Every current Premier League club’s best kit from the past decade England’s most successful clubs of the past decade, according to trophies won 1 shining silverware Boxing Day fixtures: All nine Premier League games live on talkSPORT possible standings How the Premier League table could change after the Boxing Day fixtures smart causal RANKED Latest Liverpool News REVEALED Jurgen Klopp recruited Alisson Becker in the summer and he has started the season as the side’s new number one.Loris Karius will now make a new start at Besiktas, who have began their new campaign with back-to-back league victories. Karius will have two seasons in Turkey gameday cracker Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injury Premier League Team of the Season so far, including Liverpool and Leicester stars Liverpool news live: Klopp reveals when Minamino will play and issues injury update Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won latest Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? huge blow REVEALED #CometoBeşiktaş #Continues#NewEpisode pic.twitter.com/7WIpzeBAwL— Beşiktaş JK (@Besiktas) August 25, 2018last_img read more

Tesco recalls ‘Finest chocolate cake’ due to undeclared walnuts

first_imgTesco Ireland have put out a recall for a batch of its Tesco Finest Chocolate Cake due to an allergy alert. The supermarket has notified customers that the wrong cake was placed in the box of a certain batch that may pose a health issue to people with allergies.Cakes under the batch number D32/18003 were incorrectly packed with carrot cake. The carrot cake contains walnuts which are undeclared on the label and could pose a risk to people with nut allergies. “This may make the batch unsafe for consumers who are allergic to or intolerant of walnuts,” the alert said.If you have a cake under the batch number with a best before date: 17 January 2018, you can return it to the store for a refund.“Please return the affected product to store where a full refund will be given. No receipt is required. “Tesco apologises to our customers for any inconvenience caused.” Tesco recalls ‘Finest chocolate cake’ due to undeclared walnuts was last modified: January 10th, 2018 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:chocolate cakefoodrecalltescolast_img read more