Thousands Blacked Out After Powerful Storm Hits Long Island

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A powerful storm caused power outages to more than 74,000 homes and businesses in northern Suffolk County early Tuesday morning—some of which will remain in the dark for days, officials said.Although the majority of those who lost power have had it restored, about 20,000 remained blacked out at sundown Tuesday with about half of those still expected to be without power Wednesday, according to PSEG Long Island. The remaining estimated 1,000 emergency repairs that need to be made will be time consuming, the utility’s leader said.“This storm packed a very strong, concentrated punch,” said David Daly, president and chief operating officer of PSEG Long Island, who said additional crews have been called in from surrounding areas to assist in the repairs. He noted that hospitals and other critical customers in the area have had their power restored.Daly said the “pop-up” summer thunder storm left half-mile stretches of downed trees in a 40-mile stretch from Huntington and Brookhaven towns on the North Shore. The extensive damage is hampering the repair work, but utility staffers and their backup are working with tree trimmers.The storm is the worst severe weather seen on LI since a record 13 inches of rain fell in one day in and around the Town of Islip a year ago next week, causing widespread flooding that washed out several roadways and caused sinkholes.In Tuesday’s storms, the towns of Brookhaven and Smithtown were the hardest hit, particularly areas north of Jericho Turnpike, officials said.Jay Engle, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, said that the damage caused by this storm came from “straight line wind,” which is defined as a damaging wind that exceed 40-50 mph—with Gov. Andrew Cuomo saying winds reached up to 80 mph on LI. Engle said that although this storm seemed extreme, it would still simply be classified as a severe thunderstorm, which formed when an old sea breeze boundary met with the warm, humid air that was felt earlier this week.In addition to residential power outages, the storms forced the Long Island Rail Road to temporarily suspend service on parts of the Port Jefferson line, stranding some commuters. Train service between Port Jefferson and Stony Brook was restored during the Tuesday evening commute, which initially saw some cancellations due to downed trees and power outages.“I have authorized all resources from Parks and Waste Management Departments to assist the Highway Department in the clean-up effort,” added Brookhaven Town Supervisor Ed Romaine.“As communities across the state continue to experience and respond to extreme storms, I am urging all New Yorkers in the impacted regions to exercise caution,” Cuomo said. “Thunderstorms and flash flooding can quickly create dangerous situations, and New Yorkers in any of the worst hit areas should be careful if they must leave home.”For updates on power outages and other services, customers should visit PSEG’s website: psegliny.com or call 1-800-490-0075.last_img read more

Decathlon king Ashton Eaton announces retirement

first_imgAMERICAN decathlete Ashton Eaton, who won gold at London 2012 and Rio 2016, has retired from athletics.Two-time Olympic decathlon gold medallist Ashton Eaton has announced his retirement from competitive action with immediate effect.Eaton defended his Olympic title in Rio last year, breaking his own world record in the process, having first claimed decathlon gold at London 2012.The 30-year-old was also prolific at the World Championships, bursting onto the international scene in 2011 when he won silver behind United States teammate Trey Hardee.Eaton beat Hardee by 198 points in the London Games, before going on to seal back-to-back World titles in Moscow and Beijing.With a glittering career behind him Eaton has opted to step away from athletics, saying: “Frankly there isn’t much more I want to do in sport.“I gave the most physically robust years of my life to the discovery and pursuit of my limits in this domain. Did I reach them? Truthfully, I’m not sure anyone really does.“It seems like we tend to run out of time or will before we run out of potential. That makes humanity limitless then, as far as I’m concerned. And I think that’s inspiring.”His wife Brianne Theisen-Eaton also announced her retirement and steps away from a career in the heptathlon, having claimed bronze in Rio, adding to silver medals in the Moscow and Beijing World Championships.“Crossing the 800m finish line in Rio I didn’t have this feeling,” she said.“I was mentally exhausted. I have never been so thankful to be finished something in my life. I felt like I never wanted to do another heptathlon again.“I gave the last 4 years everything I could. I put my life on hold. Track and field was the priority before everything else: my family, my friends, my marriage, my future. This is something I chose to do and I don’t regret it for a second. It made me happy to pursue something I was so passionate about.“I no longer have the passion for track and field or the heptathlon that I used to, because I know I can’t advance any further in the sport. I’ve given it all I can and I refuse to come back and half-ace it because I love and respect this event and sport too much.” (Sportsmax)last_img read more