Authorities: Chimney Inspector Impostors Stole from Elderly Women

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County authorities said Wednesday that two men posing as chimney inspectors have been indicted for bias crime charges after they allegedly stole jewelry and cash from two elderly women last month. The District Attorney’s office accused 32-year-old Bruce Wimmer of Bohemia and 28-year-old Michael Windland of Lake Ronkonkoma of allegedly scamming a 77-year-old Huntington woman two weeks ago by telling her that they were chimney repairmen and needed to get into the house for an inspection. Once inside, the pair allegedly stole jewelry from the woman’s bedroom, the DA’s office said. Several days later, Windland and Wimmer entered a 92-year-old Bellport woman’s home under the guise of inspecting her chimney and allegedly stole $160 cash, a portion of which came from church envelopes, and the victim’s prescription medication, authorities said. The alleged burglars also quoted the woman $3,000 for chimney work and said they’d drive her to the bank to withdraw money. The DA’s office didn’t immediately say if they followed through with that plan. Both men were scheduled to be arraigned on the grand jury indictment Wednesday morning in Riverhead.last_img read more

Priya Jaikumar stresses importance of choice

first_imgPriya Jaikumar, an associate professor at the USC School of Cinematic Arts, discussed how her personal experiences affected her ideas on film and education as part of the What Matters to Me and Why lecture series Wednesday at the Ground Zero Performance Café.Like the movies · Priya Jaikumar, an associate professor in the School of Cinematic Arts, says film allows her to understand the world from the perspectives of other people. – Priyanka Patel | Daily TrojanJaikumar worked as a journalist in India when the opportunity arose for her to study abroad in the United States in 1991. She said her decision to come to the United States embodied a conflict particular to Indian women of her generation and social situation.“My life was at a crossroads, and I didn’t know how significant my decision would be,” Jaikumar said. “It was a choice between a settled personal life [in India] and a complete unknown entity. My dilemma was very specific to the 20th century as it was something I faced as an educated woman. It was a particular privilege, a precarious privilege.”She said this privilege ultimately affected her values and beliefs as she realized the opportunities afforded to her because of her education.“What I particularly value is to make such instances of mobility and opportunity available to more people,” Jaikumar said. “A majority of humanity does not have this. We do not have the privilege or choice of following our hearts.”Jaikumar also addressed how film allows her to make an impact on education because it expresses and communicates new worlds.“Using my classes as a platform to bring [film] forward and open up a range of sensibilities for my audiences is very important to me,” Jaikumar said. “Part of education is walking a mile in someone else’s shoes and opening up your sympathies. Film allows you to see in other perspectives and alter your perception of the world.”Jaikumar said she joined the critical studies department because it combines two of the most influential forces in her life: the creative impulse to make tangible contributions to the world and the critical impulse to think about the connections between the world we create and the world we inhabit.“I believe the best creativity in the sciences and in the arts are born only when there is support of the critical impulse,” Jaikumar said. “This is why I’m in the department of critical studies.”Jaikumar said her decision to study abroad still affects her values to this day.“In my lifetime, I had a choice,” Jaikumar said. “I left my family behind, and I’m here, so my students and colleagues are important to me. My life I have made here is important with my husband and my child.”Jaikumar, who serves as a residential faculty adviser to Parkside Arts & Humanities Residential College, is working on a book about places that become visual icons entitled Where Histories Reside: Filming India as Location. She plans to continue to write, engage with other people and retain her curiosity and sense of wonder.“Those who remain open and curious can transcend the linearity and fatality of time,” Jaikumar said. “That is what I’m invested in and, independent of film, that is what I dedicate my life to.”last_img read more