Lazio fined €20,000 for Balotelli abuse

first_imgRelatedPosts Immobile extends Lazio contract till 2025 Atalanta whip Brescia to go second in Serie A Genoa hit back with two penalty kicks to draw at Brescia Lazio have been fined €20,000 for their fans’ racist abuse at Mario Balotelli during their win at Brescia on Sunday. Balotelli was on the receiving end of monkey chants as well as other insulting chants throughout the first half in particular. Referee Gianluca Manganiello was informed of the abuse by Balotelli and an announcement was then made to warn the away supporters that further discriminatory chanting could lead to the game’s suspension. “After 21 and 29 minutes of the first half, Lazio fans engaged in a chorus of racial discrimination against a player of the opposing team,” a statement read on Wednesday, confirming the punishment. “These were in addition to other insulting songs against the same player in the 21st, 29th and 42nd minutes. “These led to the referee having an announcement made in the 30th minute of the first half.”Tags: BresciaGianluca ManganielloLazioMario Balotellilast_img read more

Football News Aubameyang steals Arsenal’s comeback to reach Europa League quarter-finals

first_imghighlights New Delhi: Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang spearheaded Arsenal’s revival by scoring twice in a 3-0 win over Rennes to reach the Europa League quarter-finals 4-3 on aggregate, as Chelsea and Napoli also booked a last-eight spot on Thursday. The Gunners canceled out their 3-1 deficit from last week’s first leg in France inside 15 minutes as Aubameyang swept home from close range before teeing up Ainsley Maitland-Niles to head home. However, Rennes had cause to complain as Aubameyang should have been flagged offside before the second goal.With VAR not in use for the Europa League unlike the Champions League, there was no recourse for Rennes and the Ligue 1 side will also reflect on missed opportunities after the break as a historic European run for the club came to an end. M’Baye Niang struck the post and Sead Kolasinac’s last-ditch tackle denied Ismaila Sarr before the Bosnian wing-back crossed for Aubameyang to give Arsenal breathing space. Aubameyang spearheaded Arsenal’s revival by scoring twice in a 3-0 win over Rennes.Pierre-Emerick reaches the Europa League quarter-finals 4-3 on aggregate.Winning the Europa League also offers Arsenal and Chelsea the safety net of Champions League qualification. Winning the Europa League also offers Arsenal and Chelsea the safety net of Champions League qualification should they fail to make the top four in the Premier League. But Arsenal boss Unai Emery, who won the Europa League three times as Sevilla coach, also wants the glory of a trophy in his first season in charge.”It is not only the possibility to go to Champions League, but it also is one title and we can feel the possibility to win one title,” said the Spaniard. Chelsea cruised into the last eight with greater ease as six Premier League sides will take their place in Friday’s quarter-finals draws with Manchester City, Manchester United, Liverpool and Tottenham in the last eight of the Champions League.After a 3-0 victory in last week’s last 16, first leg at Stamford Bridge, Chelsea was even more dominant in Kiev as Olivier Giroud scored his first hat-trick for the club.”We started very well. We wanted to start in this way,” Chelsea manager Maurizio Sarri told BT Sport.”We played a wonderful first half and managed the game in the second half.” Giroud, who is yet to start in the Premier League in 2019 after the signing of Gonzalo Higuain, netted a first-half double before Marcos Alonso slid home a third on the stroke of half-time. Frenchman Giroud completed his hat-trick before teenage winger Callum Hudson-Odoi rounded off the scoring. For all the Latest Sports News News, Football News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

WADA committee recommends four-year Russia Olympic ban

first_imgBy Steve Keating(REUTERS) – Russia should be hit with a four-year Olympic ban and barred from all world championships for the manipulation of data retrieved from a tainted Moscow laboratory, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) said on Monday.The recommendations were made by WADA’s independent Compliance Review Committee (CRC) and will be put to the executive committee at meetings in Paris on Dec. 9.In a 26-page report CRC said the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) should be declared non-compliant after an investigation found data handed over from a tainted Moscow laboratory was neither complete nor fully authentic. Weary of a doping saga that has dragged on since 2015, WADA looks prepared to follow through on threats it made to come down hard on Russia if it failed to get control of the doping crisis.A four-year ban would prevent Russia from taking part in next year’s Tokyo Olympics and the 2022 Beijing Winter Games. The CRC recommendations did, however, leave the door open for the participation of Russians as happened at the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Games where some of the country’s athletes competed as neutrals under the Olympic flag.These athletes would have to demonstrate that they are clean and meet a number of other strict conditions. The CRC also recommended that Russia not be allowed to host or bid for any major sporting event and any events that have already been awarded should be moved to another country, unless it was legally or practically impossible to do so.In addition, Russia may not bid for the right to host the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games, irrespective of whether the bidding takes place during a ban.For a four-year period athletes and officials representing Russia, including the president, secretary-general, CEO and any member of the executive board of the Russian Olympic Committee, would not be welcome at any major sporting event. Russia can appeal any sanctions to the Court of Arbitration for Sport. Russia was again under the doping microscope when WADA said in September that historical data supplied by the country’s anti-doping authority contained “inconsistencies” that resulted in a decision to open a formal compliance procedure.In a controversial decision last September, the WADA executive committee voted to conditionally restore RUSADA’s accreditation on the agreement that Russia would turn over data in a discredited Moscow laboratory.The Russian agency missed the December deadline but after last-minute brinkmanship a WADA inspection team was finally allowed to retrieve the data in January, recovering more than 2,200 samples. That was expected to bring an end to the Russian doping affair until the evidence of tampering was unearthed.last_img read more

Willow Bay named head of journalism school

first_imgJournalist Willow Bay was named the new director of the School of Journalism at the Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism on Wednesday morning.New directions · Journalist Willow Bay looks forward to taking on her new position as the new director of the School of Journalism. – Photo courtesy of Max Iger Bay, who will start her position in July, brings in a wide range of experience. Currently the senior editor of the Huffington Post and a special correspondent for Bloomberg TV, Bay additionally has been an author, producer, digital news editor and national broadcast and global television news anchor.“[Bay’s] prominent broadcast experience includes stints as co-anchor of ABC News’ Good Morning America/Sunday; co-anchor of CNN’s Moneyline News Hour; host, lead writer and producer of CNN’s long-form program Pinnacle; substitute anchor on NBC’s Early Today and other                                                       MSNBC/NBC programs; co-host of NBA Inside Stuff; and host, writer and executive producer of the Lifetime documentary Spotlight 25,” a press release released by USC stated.Bay, who has never worked in an academic setting before, said her new position at the Annenberg School will allow her to influence a new wave of young journalists.“I think Annenberg represents an extraordinary opportunity,” Bay said. “First, to educate and inspire a next generation of journalists, but also to bring into a world of practice, a new skill set and really new ways of covering stories that Annenberg students learn, and frankly that they are fluent in and well-versed in when they graduate.”Bay’s position as director will begin right before the grand opening of Wallis Annenberg Hall, something she is excited about.“It is a tremendous [occasion] for Annenberg to take an important role in a conversation, frankly a global conversation, about the future of journalism,” Bay said. “I think one of the key goals will be to settle in to the new Wallis Annenberg Hall and to fully leverage all of those technologies.”Bay originally began working as a model when she was 15 years old, but said that journalism was always her true passion.“I have always wanted to be a reporter ever since I was in high school, and that is actually, how I got into modeling,” Bay said. “I went for an internship at Seventeen Magazine. I started my career in a pursuit of a job in journalism!”Wallis Annenberg, chairman, president and CEO of the Annenberg Foundation and USC Board of Trustees member, expressed immense pride in Bay’s appointment.“I cannot think of a greater director for the USC Annenberg School of Journalism, or a greater model of what journalism can achieve in today’s world,” Annenberg said in the press release.Bay’s work spans over a diverse array of the media landscape, and she noted that it’s exactly that diversity that will allow her to stand out as the new director.“I have worked in so many sections of the industry, and it gives you a familiarity with the needs of those industries and I think that will help me hugely in Annenberg,” Bay said. “Hopefully, I can use that to the advantage, not just of the school, but of the students.”Ernest Wilson III, dean of the Annenberg school, predicts that Bay’s leadership will usher the school into the future.“We have a new building, a new program and a new era. I’m thrilled that Willow Bay will be here to provide new leadership for our School of Journalism,” Wilson said in the press release.last_img read more

Arthur G keeping it local

first_imgSince Arthur G’s humble beginnings in a suburban garage in 1979, the furniture company has come a long way. What started as a mere hobby for Greek migrant Arthur Georgopoulos has developed into an upmarket brand now recognised worldwide. “He would spend some time in his garage when he had spare time making and designing furniture. “For a few weeks he hit the road and drove around with the station wagon, showing retailers. One decided to try it on consignment, they sold one and it was a flow-on effect,” explains Leonard Georgopoulos, who came aboard the family business 10 years ago as managing director.Now in his 60s, although Arthur continues to play a significant role in the design process, the overall aesthetic has admittedly changed, evolving with global trends. “Our products have become more contemporary. Most pieces are quite timeless, so they’re designed to still look good after 10 or so years. With our end of the market you are investing in quality and well-made furniture,” Leonard tells Neos Kosmos.Along with the brand’s core range of sofas, chairs, beds and shelving, the company, endeavouring to cater to each customer’s need, also offer the service of custom and bespoke pieces.More recently, the company joined forces with some of the world’s best designers and interior architects, including Diane Bergeron and Alexander Lotersztain, to create exclusive and limited edition collections. Passionate about continuing his father’s work, while endeavouring to leave a mark of his own on the company, the managing director has maintained the quality of the brand while expanding its presence. Predominantly a wholesaler, the 35-year-old has given Arthur G a greater retail presence, now with showrooms around the country in Melbourne, Sydney and Perth.“When I came in I decided that we needed to control our own destiny and that Arthur G the brand was a manufacturer but could also become a retailer. “This way we control the entire chain of events, and deal with the end user as well.”An important step for the company has been its environmental certification, having received the GECA Environmental Choice Award in 2008. Using only the best quality raw materials and exquisite fabrics and natural leathers from around the world, customers can rest assured that all aspects of the manufacturing process are eco-friendly. This has also made their product appealing for a number of commercial projects, including Hamilton Island Airport, Hayman Island Resort, Sheraton on the Park in Sydney, and Village Cinemas. But the real key to success for Arthur G appears to be in staying true to their roots.While evolving with the times and catering to the consumer’s needs and wants, they have remained true to themselves, careful not to steer away from where the passion stems: Australian quality craftsmanship. “What plays an important role in our aesthetic is the craftsmanship, the way we bring it all together. When we design something we also have in mind that the build and workmanship have to be right. You could say it’s contemporary design, but at the same time it’s got classic and timeless ties and is suitable for any setting.”Despite the trade liberalisation of the 1980s, when the bulk of manufacturing started its transition offshore, Arthur G has held its ground, designed and constructed from start to finish in the Victorian suburb of Huntingdale, as it was some 35 years ago.“To manufacture and design furniture here in Australia is quite niche, especially at our end of the market – there’s not many of us and to be honest, in the last few years there’s probably been a shift back and a real appreciation for a good Australian-made product.”Which is precisely what Arthur G is all about.Having gone from strength to strength over the last 10 years, Leonard’s passion for the brand and the industry as a whole is unquestionable. “We believe people should be embracing an Australian-made product as opposed to products that are made in South East Asia.“We have some very skilled tradespeople in Australia. The talent’s there, so we’re going to continue to nurture that and continue to expand and grow the Australian market.” Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more