Garage Sales for this weekend…

first_imgby Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — The following are the garage sales that we have for June 19, 2015. If you still need a garage sale advertised just use the comment section below. Good luck with bargain hunting!Follow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (14) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. 0 Vote up Vote down JODI WALTRIP · 269 weeks ago HUGE MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE- FRIDAY JUNE 19TH 9-6 AND SATURDAY JUNE 20TH FROM 8-NOON 905 NORTH JEFFERSON WELLINGTON LOTS OF MISC. ITEMS Report Reply 0 replies · active 269 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Concerned citizen · 269 weeks ago 4 wooden oak chairs for a total of $20 317 East 15th Call first 620-399-3059 Report Reply 0 replies · active 269 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Amy · 269 weeks ago Garage sale Saturday, June 20 from 8:00-?. Furniture, dishes, lawn mowers, bedding, Christmas decor, tools, etc… Much, much more! 1223 N. B. Sale will be inside the house. Make offers. Everything must go. Report Reply 1 reply · active 269 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Jim Bales · 269 weeks ago YARD SALE Saturday, June 20th 8:00-12:00 604 E Mill Street – Wellington Report Reply 0 replies · active 269 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down David Carroll · 269 weeks ago CARPORT SALE Saturday June 20th 8:00 to ? 1502 N. Blaine Lots of fishing equipment, tools, dishes and lots of misc. Report Reply 0 replies · active 269 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Terri Campbell · 269 weeks ago Friday, June 19, 4-7 pm and Saturday, June 20, 8-12. 119 West 13th. Garage/estate Sale. Home decor, tools, outdoor furniture, Christmas, dishes, antique glassware, etc…. Report Reply 0 replies · active 269 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Brian · 269 weeks ago Yard Sale 1203 E 10th Street Fri. 5:00-7:00 6/19 Sat. 8:00-11:00 6/20 Lots of misc. Some hunting and fishing stuff Report Reply 0 replies · active 269 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Dwyer/Defore · 269 weeks ago 901 S. Blaine Saturday 7 – 11 a.m. Name brand teen girl clothes size 0 – 5 (jeans, dress clothes, coats, etc.), nice golf polos, prom dress, shoes, boots, lamps, b&w printer, nintendo ds with games, digital camera, fishing poles, home decor, seasonal items, George Foreman grill with waffle iron, books, bird cage and so much more! Report Reply 0 replies · active 269 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Mike Glick · 269 weeks ago Garage sale. 610 N Washington, oak and walnut boards, planed two sides, rough edges. Walnut 1×6’s 75 to 100 inches long, Oak: 1×4’s, 1×6’s, 1×8’s, 1×10, 1×12. Garage will be open 8:00 AM. To 12:00 Sat June 20 or call 620-326-3163 to view. Report Reply 0 replies · active 269 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Melissa · 268 weeks ago Multi family garage sale 114 north Plum. Lots of misc. hide a bed couch, large desk with hutch, clothes all sizes, and some baby stuff. Report Reply 0 replies · active 268 weeks ago 12Next » Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

Raised Houses Deterred Storm Damage

first_imgBy John Burton“I think we all breathed some sigh of relief when (Hurricane) Joaquin went off to the right,” heading of f into the Atlantic Ocean, Clean Ocean Action Executive Director Cindy Zipf said this week after assessing damage.Zipf was echoing many others who were planning for the worst, given reports that the hurricane could be barreling toward the Eastern Seaboard.Thankfully, it was not a hit but on the negative side areas prone to flooding once again showed our vulnerability; there was beach erosion and one storm-related death occurring in Colts Neck. But property damage was minimal, according to officials, thanks very much to the number of homes raised as a result of Super Storm Sandy. On the positive side, the rainfall over the of period of days last week went a long way to alleviating the water shortfall the county has had for months now.Tragically, Stacey Weathers, 46, Tinton Falls, was killed last Saturday, when the convertible Ford Mustang she was driving was hit by a falling tree along state Highway 34, near the intersection of Route 520. There was heavy rain and wind at approximately 4:25 p.m., when the incident occurred according to Colts Neck police.Weathers was the executive director of the state chapter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, and she was instrumental in the organization’s efforts raising $7 million for patients and support research.That was the only reported injury related to the severe weather, according to Monmouth County Sheriff Shaun Golden.“We were fortunate,” given we were spared the brunt of the hurricane, Golden said. “That was good news.“The bad news,” he continued, “any time we get these nor’easters,” given the county’s 27 miles of shoreline and 22 coastal towns, “It’s prone to flooding” and “it showed in the usual spots,” Golden said, such as Sea Bright and Highlands and other locations.Since Super Storm Sandy in October 2012, “We’re more sensitive to it. Residents in those areas know what to expect,” Golden observed, meaning they know to do things like move vehicles from low lying areas, as well as taking other steps.“We had a lot of flooding,” acknowledged C. ReadMurphy, Sea Bright Office of Emergency Management director. The ocean and river front Sea Bright had on some side streets, at their end, facing the Shrewsbury River, as much as 5 feet of flooding. On portions of Ocean Avenue/ Highway 36 there was 2 1⁄2 feet of water blocking the roadway. But emergency services were prepared and traffic continued to move without disruption, Murphy said.“It was nice and quiet,” he said. “It was as good as flooding can be.”One interesting point, Murphy noted, given the number of homes elevated when rebuilt after being damaged and destroyed by Sandy, the structures were spared the effects of this flooding. “No houses took on water,” he said.Highlands had localized flooding in the traditional area, in the low-lying areas off of Bay Avenue, explained Tim Hill, Highlands administrator, as well as some tree damage. “It’s hard to gauge overall beach erosion,” on the narrow bay front beaches available in the borough, Hill said, “but we don’t think the beaches were severely impacted,” and there was “no significant damage to any municipal property.”“We were prepared,” Hill said. “Thank goodness we didn’t need it.”The hurricane hung around the Caribbean islands before turning east in the Atlantic Ocean sparing the U.S. Eastern Seaboard. And the weather we experienced for much of last week, with heavy rain and strong winds, wasn’t really a nor’easter, according to David Robinson, New Jersey State Climatologist, at Rutgers University.“It was a very complex situation,” involving the colliding of a persistent cold front and its low pressure “bringing a long fetch of moisture,” and rain and high-pressure front, along with some strong onshore winds. “We were squeezed between the two systems,” from about late Tuesday/early Wednesday until Saturday, coupling with it higher than normal high tides – as much as 2 feet higher, Robinson said.This weather formation resulted in as much as 5.47 inches of rain falling over that period in portions of Monmouth County. And that, Robinson pointed out, is “the bulk of a month’s precipitation,” for the area and the only rainfall we’ve had in more than three weeks.“That gets us a good ways toward replenishing some of the ground water,” which had been depleted by the dry spell, he said.That’s the good news. “The bad news is the beaches took a pounding,” with the high tides and winds eroding shorefronts, he explained.“The worrisome part of that is we have the winter storm season ahead,” said Robinson, and any buffer that the beachfronts may have had for an added bit of protection for between November and March and April storms, is now virtually gone. “And that makes the coast more vulnerable,” he warned.Robinson told of weather predictions for an El Nino weather patterns for the Pacific Ocean. That traditionally results in a more active and severe storm activity for New Jersey. “No guarantee but that’s what’s been known to happen,” he said.“With every storm we’re reminded again and again about sea level rise and the reality of what happens when Mother Nature kicks up our heals,” Zipf observed. “We’re playing touch and go and praying for good weather and that’s no way to conduct public policy for creating sustainable communities.”Robinson agreed and in any face-off “Ultimately, the odds are going to continue to tilt in Mother Nature’s favor.”last_img read more

Microgrid Study To Determine Middletown’s Future Resiliency

first_imgBy Jay Cook |MIDDLETOWN – An effort to make the township more storm resilient while protecting many essential services is advancing.On Nov. 13 the governing body agreed to spend a $150,000 grant from the state Board of Public Utilities on a 12-month microgrid feasibility study. The goal is to explore the creation of a backup power source on a portion of Naval Weapons Station Earle’s waterfront base in Leonardo which would connect to more than a dozen municipal, county and federal services.“It’s a pretty big deal for us, when you think about what happened to Middletown after Sandy,” said Middletown Mayor Gerry Scharfenberger.A microgrid is defined by the BPU as “a group of interconnected loads and distributed energy resources (DER) within clearly defined electrical boundaries that acts as a single controllable entity with respect to the grid.” Microgrids have the ability to connect and disconnect from the electrical grid to enable it to operate in both grid-connected or island mode.The wish list of services being sought for connection to the microgrid are NWS Earle’s Waterfront Administration Area, Township of Middletown Sewage Authority, NY Waterways Ferry Terminal, Middletown Public Works and CNG Fueling Facilities, Middletown’s municipal complex, Leonardo Elementary School, Bayview Elementary School, Bayshore Middle School, Monmouth County Highway Department, Middletown Fire Stations 3, 4 and 7 and the Monmouth County Bayshore Outfall Authority, according to the BPU.Middletown was one of 13 entities in New Jersey awarded grant money in January by the BPU for the studies, which totaled over $2 million. Neptune Township was the only other Monmouth County town given a grant.Middletown officials are supporting the study, hoping it can provide significant backup to flood-prone areas along the Bayshore.Scharfenberger compared the township to a checkerboard with the microgrid protecting one or a few of the squares in a specific area.“I think we submitted a good proposal,” added township administrator Anthony Mercantante. “Because we were partnering with a federal agency, particularly the military, that made it attractive. We were also a town that was significantly impacted by the last two hurricanes, so clearly there’s a need for power resiliency along the coast.”Mercantante noted two specific areas in Middletown which could benefit the most: the Route 36 corridor and Port Monmouth. He said Route 36 is a key evacuation route out from the Bayshore which should have a backup.Also, Phase II of the $110 million Port Monmouth Flood Wall is under construction. “Reliable power to that during a storm is important,” Mercantante said, considering it would protect low-lying areas in the event of another major hurricane.Cooperation with NWS Earle was necessary for the study to go forward as preliminary plans have the microgrid positioned inside the base’s Leonardo post.Continuing to invest in storm resiliency is important for the United States Navy, said Dennis Blazak, NWS Earle’s community plans and liaison officer. He said NWS Earle suffered more than $50 million in damages and was out of power for a week after Super Storm Sandy.“It would mean that if we had another Hurricane Sandy, we’d still be able to operate and do our mission and work with our partners in the community,” Blazak said.William Addison, NWS Earle’s spokesman, said keeping military operations open is of utmost importance. He said NWS Earle is unique along the East Coast because of its ability to quickly supply ordnance to the Atlantic Fleet’s Carrier and Expeditionary Strike Groups.“Nobody can do it on the scale that we do it, and nobody can do it with the speed that we can,” Addison said. “That’s really where it comes into play for us.”Blazak also said microgrid consideration is laid out in the Joint Land Use Study, a federally funded project by the Department of Defense looking at how NWS Earle and its neighboring Monmouth County communities coexist.Mercantante said a microgrid would have no connection to the Monmouth County Reliability Project, a proposed 230-kV transmission line travelling from Aberdeen through Hazlet, Holmdel and Middletown before terminating in Red Bank. The Jersey Central Power & Light proposal currently sits before an Office of Administrative Law judge for a preliminary decision.Middletown awarded the $150,000 grant money to Leidos Engineering, a Massachusetts-based firm, and Scharfenberger anticipates a contract will be signed this week. Mercantante added a public hearing would ensue once the 12-month study is concluded. He also said it’s too early to tell what the cost of a microgrid would be if it’s found feasible, but said grant money and help from different agencies would be important.Addison echoed those statements, saying the study is a “joint effort.”“It can’t just be the Navy or the townships,” he said. “We certainly have to work together. We share that shoreline and we share that need.”This article was first published in the Nov. 16-23, 2017 print edition of the Two River Times.last_img read more