We must root out corruption in order to save the AFC

first_imgDear Editor,The AFC, from all indications, is operating as a separate dictatorship faction within the coalition Government. This gets into the realm of promoting corruption when the current situation is analyzed.The reinstatement of NCN Berbice branch manager is a glowing tribute to cronyism and corruption of the AFC and its intolerance of transparency and accountability. This person was sent on administrative leave for 10 months, during which she was paid her full salary with all benefits. Now she is back on the job, despite evidence surfacing during the investigations to warrant her dismissal.According to statements given by the staff who were dismissed, the NCN manager instructed them to prepare ‘fake invoices’ and to make ‘fake log entries’. The reason for her reinstatement would have been because of her ‘good relationship’ with the same AFC minister who is in charge of NCN. The CEO of NCN was apparently instructed by this high ranking minister to reinstate her.The recent firing of Chronicle columnists Dr David Hinds and Lincoln Lewis was done at the behest of this high ranking AFC minister. In a letter to the press, Hinds stated that, “a Senior AFC Minister has, over time, been raising at the Cabinet level the issue of Hinds’ and Lewis’ columns. It was that same minister who gave instructions to the Editor-in-Chief to axe the columnists”. He added that “the Chronicle and the rest of the State media are controlled by the AFC as part of the distribution of spoils after the election. The Prime Minister has direct oversight of this sector”. Even two top AFC members who are members of the Board ‘rubber-stamped the decision to fire the columnists, according to Hinds’s letter.It can be seen from the two examples that the same senior minister gave instructions to reinstate the NCN manager and to fire the reputable and independent columnists.These two actions will not improve the already poor image of the AFC and its disappearing supporters; since, apart from being silent on many important issues, what is clearly manifested is its promotion of corruption and its dictatorial tendencies.I also have compelling evidence to support the allegation that AFC’s most prominent and well-respected member in Berbice, Gobin Harbhajan, is extremely disgruntled and disappointed with some of his AFC colleagues. This gentleman has been the only face of the AFC in Berbice, and has been doing a fantastic job in the resolution of many problems facing Berbicians.Berbice is vitally important for the survival of the AFC, but it seems that the AFC leaders are quite content with their ‘good life’, and no longer care about continued existence of the AFC.At this point, there is only one person who is keeping the AFC alive in Region 6, and that is Gobin Harbhajan, a man who is not corrupt, and is dedicating his energies to assist persons in various communities. I am sure he has a large following, and should he decide to walk away from the AFC, a lot of supporters will follow him.Mr Harbhajan should seriously think about his political future, and the need to be of continued service to his fellowmen.Yours sincerely,Doodnauth Jagmohanlast_img read more

Accounts differ on U.S. attack that killed 25 Iraqis

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! BAGHDAD – U.S. troops backed by aircraft attacked a Shiite town north of Baghdad at dawn on Friday, killing at least 25 Iraqis the military described as criminals who were involved in the transport of weapons. But Iraqis at the scene said the dead were civilians, though some were armed. The military said it had been searching for an insurgent leader believed to be associated with the elite Iranian Quds Force, which U.S. intelligence sources believe is working in Iraq to foment violent activity by some Shiite militias. A military spokesman said the raid was unsuccessful in capturing the insurgent leader. Iraqis at the scene gave an account that diverged sharply from that of the military. They said the Iraqis who were killed were trying to defend their town from al-Qaida in Mesopotamia, the homegrown Sunni militant group that U.S. intelligence believes has foreign leadership. Al-Qaida in Mesopotamia has been active in Diyala province, where the town is located, but so have militias associated with the anti-American Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREChargers go winless in AFC West with season-ending loss in Kansas City“The residents were defending themselves and the town,” said Uday al-Khadran, the mayor of Khalis, the district in which the fighting occurred. “They were not militias for killing people, and they were recognized by the security forces in the district, and this issue is familiar in all the towns of Khalis because of al-Qaida threats, especially to the Shiite,” he said. However, a statement the U.S. military released described a serious onslaught from the Iraqis in the town. As U.S. forces approached the village, the statement said, they came under heavy fire and called in airstrikes. “Responding in self-defense, the ground force returned fire,” the statement said. “Enemy fire intensified, and supporting aircraft were called in an attempt to suppress the threat. The armed group continued to engage and began to aggressively maneuver toward coalition forces, firing assault rifles and rocket-propelled grenades,” the statement continued.last_img read more