Letters to the Editor for Sunday, Sep. 1

first_imgDon’t blame others for actions of guiltyIt’s not often that you get two letters on the same day, Aug. 24, that look to blame someone or something else for the actions of the guilty.One blames Gov. Andrew Cuomo for opening the floodgates to make anyone with a Roman collar target for a lawsuit.Well what did you expect? Look at the track record of the cover-up in the Catholic Church. How many of you would feel comfortable leaving your little ones in a room alone with a priest?They lost their credibility due to their own actions, and now they have left themselves exposed to the consequences. Will there be some not-so-legitimate claims? Perhaps. But how many hundreds of the abused will never speak up or come forward as to what happened to them? Sounds like a wash to me. The Catholic Church brought this upon itself and has tarnished all its clergy. Blame Cuomo? Once again, take your eye off the problem and place blame elsewhere.The second letter was about not punishing children who are not vaccinated. Are we losing our minds here? The Aug. 17 editorial was right on the money. The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or the one. The children aren’t the guilty ones here. It’s the parents’ refusal to comply with vaccinations, not caring how, if or when their actions will affect others based upon their beliefs. Sounds pretty selfish to me. I’m glad my parents weren’t selfish and got me vaccinated.Bob BeliveGlenvilleLicense plate plan is a way to stick it to usWhat is the purpose of new license plates other than more revenue, which the state will mismanage?This is just another fine example of why people are leaving New York state.I find it hilarious our governor is touting that we can choose which plate will become our state plate.You can bet the “choice” will not be ours, as the governor will choose the plate with the new bridge named after his father, and they will be our new plates.I have two cars, a truck and two motorcycles, and all their plates are fine. No need for new ones.New York is always finding ways to gouge its people.Michael P. Croce Sr.Ballston SpaInstall warning bar to stop bridge crashesI’m amazed at the lack of foresight by anyone in charge of making sure that our beautiful new bridge over Glenridge Road is protected from trucks and their drivers who can’t read a multitude of signs warning them they are about to be embarrassed after they run into said bridge.The solution sits less than three-tenths of a mile from our mayor’s office at the Dunkin’ Donuts in back of the Sunoco station. It’s called a truck height warning bar, which could save the Glenville police time and money, not to mention all the damage to the bridge and the time spent by motorists being stuck in these events.Trucks have had to stop and try to turn around on this narrow street, holding up traffic on an already-busy road. It took me 5 seconds to find them online.Hang this bar over the right-hand lane on Glenridge just before Bruce Drive, and then the truck driver has a chance to abort his trip, turn onto Bruce Drive and go in a different route to get to Route 50.They even come with warning lights and lit-up signs to let them know that they will hit the bridge. This isn’t rocket science. Why put up more signs that seem to do no good? How many more trucks will hit the bridge before this simple solution will be used?Denise CrisciScotia More from The Daily Gazette:Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homes Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionIt’s not a right to put others’ kids at riskJust when I thought I had heard every excuse and defense from anti-vaccine advocates, Ms. Garcia went “there” in her Aug. 23 letter (“Segregation not right for unvaccinated kids”), by comparing requirements that non-vaccinated children stay home to segregation. Wow.Ms. Garcia, your supposed “heavy heart” in one that is actually weighed down by a grotesque comparison of parents who will risk the health of not only their children, but others, based on a debunked theory to the exclusion minorities from aspects of American life. This is truly devoid of any logic or reason. Ms. Garcia, do what you wish with your children, and I would hope that by the time they reach an age of consent, they will make proper healthcare decisions for themselves based on science and not something from the tin-foil-hat world. Your rights end with your children. When you endanger others, your rights end. Michael FondacaroAlbanySchool a chance to educate dirt-bikersI’m glad to see the kids who were riding dirt bikes on the streets throughout the Capital Region will be returning to school very soon.I hope that when they think about the foolish choice they made to break the law, they will realize that they could have caused accidents that  could have resulted in injuries or even death.What they thought was fun was to drive recklessly and put a scare into drivers and pedestrians throughout the cities and towns, which was an unacceptable thing to do.Hopefully, when they return to their schools, the administrators will have the pleasure of explaining to our unlawful children that riding their dirt bikes where they were riding them was an unsafe thing to teach others. So it will not be done again next year. I would hope that all the school superintendents will put my request first on their list of things to do list to try to make our roads safer.Walter “Neal” BrazellRotterdamlast_img read more

Richard “Rik” Findley

first_imgRichard P. “Rik” Findley, 67, of Osgood, died peacefully in his sleep at 12:02 a.m. Friday, September 14, 2018, at Columbus Regional Health of a massive pulmonary embolism with his wife and younger daughter present.   Burial was Monday, September 17, at Perseverance Cemetery in Osgood, just down the road from his beloved country home.A memorial service will be held on Saturday, September 22. The ceremony will be held at Dayspring Assembly of God in Indianapolis.  Pastor Danny May of Church on the Rock Versailles will officiate.  Anyone who knew Rik or the family is welcome to attend.  Please share or hear stories of how Rik made others laugh.Born in Enid Oklahoma, August 15, 1951, Rik was the son of Robert and Jeane Murray McCormick Findley, the third of seven children.  He was a member of the Osage Nation.  He was married to Mary Dragan for 8 years.  He married Robin McCafferty on May 1, 1988; they recently celebrated 30 years of wedded bliss.Rik spent his childhood in various states and a stint in Holland. He was a graduate of Warner Robins High School, Warner Robins, GA.  He would say he dropped out of University of Louisville playing bridge and chess.  One year he was even the unrated chess champion of North Carolina.Rik was a hard worker.  He worked at many jobs and loved learning new trades.  He worked up until the day before he became disabled in April 2016. His longest employment was as a diesel mechanic and building maintenance at Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation for 20 years.  Then he transitioned from mechanic to semi driver and drove a truck for LB Trucking for 13 years until he retired in 2016 where he received the safest driver award many years.  Everywhere Rik worked, they called him “Preacher”.Rik participated in many ministries.  He and his wife ran a shepherding home for women in crisis pregnancies.  He drove a church bus for many years.  His greatest ministry was his sense of humor.  He had code words for almost everything, and special names for his friends and family—for instance he called his daughter Claire the Bear and her unborn baby his Grandbear.  He was known to transpose letters at the drop of a hat, and use truck driver lingo, like “20”, “10-4”, “status”, and “roger that”.In his personal life, he kept the family’s vehicles in top running order.  He used to change everyone’s oil.  In later years when he wasn’t’ as mobile, he worked closely with his nephews to pass his skills on.  He always carried a pen and tire gauge on him .  He would check tire pressures on cars at family gatherings and church parking lots.  He was most famous for the homemade tomato sauce he canned for ZBM’s, his code for Zesty Bloody Mary’s.Rik’s domain was the kitchen on a weekend morning with his wife and daughters.  He would play music on his old 1970’s stereo and announce, “it’s a {name of artist} weekend”.   He would make a hungry man’s breakfast from scratch and then bring it to you.  Then he would mow the grass or shovel the walk with a song in his heart.  He loved his music.Rik was preceded in death by his parents and brother, Denny. Survivors include his siblings:  Jayne (Bill) Hunter of Mobile, Alabama, Tom (Peggy) of Cocoa Beach, Florida, Jody (Butch) Dennis of Spokane, Washington, Julie (Mark) Boyd of Franklin Tennessee, and Jeri Findley of Paducah, Kentucky.  He leaves behind 17 nieces and nephews and many great nieces and nephews.  He is also survived by daughters Martina (Matt) Schuett of Indianapolis and Claire (Khyle) Reed of Osgood.  He is also had 2 grandchildren with one grandchild due in March.  He was honored to be the first person to the hear the heartbeat of his unborn Grandbear.In lieu of flowers, contributions may be sent to the Community Healthcare Clinic of Decatur County – 415 E. Montgomery Road, Greensburg, IN 47240.last_img read more