NA prisoners graduate from anger management course

first_imgThirty-three inmates of the New Amsterdam Prison were on Thursday recognised after successfully completing a three-month anger management and re-entry programme.Among those who completed the course is a woman who was recently sentenced to a 98-year-jail term for poisoning her two children.Participants were chosen based on their age and length of their prison term, and the programme was conducted by Solutions Training Consultancy and Counselling Services.Among those who graced the stage all decked out in their gowns were high profile and special watch inmates. Both remand and convicted prisoners, including the recently sentenced mother who poisoned her children, were given opportunity to participate in the programme, which focused on imparting skills to prepare inmates to reintegrate into society capable of dealing with issues which would confront them, so that they would not have to be placed in such a facility again.Officer-in-charge of the New Amsterdam Prisons, Superintendent Deoraj Gyandat, explained that the programme included such areas as self-worth, how to deal with emotions, and conflict resolution. He noted that although this is only the second batch graduating from the course, he has seen a change in the prison population.“I can see the impact it is having on the location. I can say (that), for this year, we have not had any major incidents at the New Amsterdam Prisons.”Managing Director of Solutions Training Consultancy and Counselling Services, Wil Campbell, said there were noticeable changes in the attitudes of those who participated in the twelve-week programme. He noted that males and females were accommodated in separate sessions because some of the issues relating to male anger are different from those relating to female anger.In reflecting on the anger management programme, one inmate, Randy Mars, urged parents to spend more time with their male children.Meanwhile, Valentine’s Day murder accused Mandy Sukhdeo said the programme allowed her to identify and be in touch with her emotions. According to the dentist, after completing the programme, she no longer considers herself an outcast.“A lot of people see us as outcasts, lawbreakers, and say we have no future and are no-good elements in society. I have learnt a lot being in prison. I am from Parika, and many nights I would sit at my bed and I would cry and I will ask, ‘Lord, why me?’ But today I no longer have to ask ‘Lord, why me?’, rather I have the answer to my question.“From being in this programme, it has given me the power and the analytical skills to focus on what it is that I want, and not what persons might think of me. Ladies and gentlemen, I tell you it is time to stand up for yourself,” she told the graduation class, while urging all to be ambassadors of peace.“If there is peace, then we can conquer any situation. I stand as an inmate of this institution, and now I am not ashamed to say that I am an inmate of this institution…”Managing Director of Solutions Training Consultancy and Counselling Services, Wil Campbell, said the programme which he taught would have posed many challenges did not seek any difficulties. He noted that the inmates were all happy and willing to participate in the anger management programme.According to him, there were noticeable changes in the attitudes of those who participated in the twelve-week programme.In the past, anger management programmes have been conducted in the prisons over the years. However, Campbell feels this one is different. “I think that ours is a bit different, in that we used a therapy approach rather that  teaching approach; so what we help the participations do is to understand themselves, understand the source of their anger, and thereby learn how to deal with it,” Campbell told <>.“Because it is not just about giving information about anger and how to deal with it, but helping them understand their own unique situation, their own circumstances, and to learn techniques that they can use that are specifically adapted to the individual.”The programme was part of two pilot skills training programmes being undertaken by the Guyana Prison Service. The other was a similar program held for inmates of the Timehri Prison.Meanwhile, a similar graduation took place at the Timehri Prison on Wednesday.During the three-month programme, participants were helped to understand the nature of anger, and to appreciate that it is something normal and okay to be angry. “We looked at some of the causes of anger, things like communication blocks, irrational thinking, the feeling that you must get respect from everyone, and this whole idea that respect must be earned or demanded. We also looked at the importance of forgiveness,” Campbell said.He noted that many persons are angry because they are holding on to past hurts, and as a result their anger is misdirected to random people, or others who are not the real source of the anger.“So we taught them how to let go of past hurts, how to forgive, and also how to apologize and how to accept apologies,” Campbell explained.According to Campbell, who is also a Psychologist and University of Guyana lecturer in Psychology, next year, it is being hoped that the programme will be run again and be extended to other facilities.last_img read more

Van Dijk can get even better after dream start – Klopp

first_img0Shares0000Liverpool’s German manager Jurgen Klopp hugs Liverpool’s Dutch defender Virgil van Dijk at the end of an FA Cup third round match against Everton at Anfield © AFP / Paul ELLISLIVERPOOL, United Kingdom, Jan 6 – Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp believes Virgil van Dijk will get even better after he scored the winning goal against Everton in a “fairytale” Merseyside derby debut.Van Dijk headed home six minutes from full-time to give Liverpool a 2-1 victory in their FA Cup third-round tie with the Toffees after Gylfi Sigurdsson had cancelled out James Milner’s opener from the penalty spot. The Dutchman became the most expensive defender in the world when he joined Liverpool from Southampton for £75 million ($102 million, 85 million euros) this month and Klopp could not be happier with his contribution in his first match for the Reds.“Fairytale in a world with not a lot of fairy tales anymore, so I think something like that is quite special,” said the Liverpool boss.“It was a difficult decision to make to be honest because, to be 100 percent honest, the first plan was not to start him but then Dejan Lovren and Ragnar Klavan played a lot of games in the last few weeks, so I changed my mind .“It was a big fight, it was not brilliant football, it was not the most beauty — it was how cup games should be. It is not about who is the better side, who can do this or that. Things like this can happen sometimes, but it is pretty rare.”Van Dijk was a commanding presence at the heart of Liverpool’s defence, although Klopp thinks the centre-back has only given a glimpse of his qualities as he predicted the best is yet to come from the Netherlands international.“He showed a lot of things we want him to show in the future very often,” Klopp added.“Heading of course, football-wise his first touch was good, good under pressure and then around set pieces a proper threat,” he added, praising Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain for his corner.“I think first of all we should help him just to be as good as he is already because that’s why we took him. You don’t pay that amount of money for a player and think ‘OK, we can get another 80 per cent’, but of course there is room for improvement.“But the first improvement will be to adapt really to the team, how we deal in different situations. But as I said, since he is in, we spoke more about it and we did it actually on the pitch.”Everton manager Sam Allardyce felt his side had done enough at Anfield to earn a replay after a battling display.“I’m very disappointed we’re not going back to Goodison and trying to get through to the next round,” he said.“We may have saved it late on and I think it was a brilliant effort from the players, even though we’re disappointed.“The performance deserved us to be able to take them back to our place, but that’s not to be.”0Shares0000(Visited 5 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

17YearOld Charged in Crash That Killed 2 Atascocita High School Students

first_img Share Two teenagers from Atascocita High School were killed and a driver was hurt when a car struck a tree and the force of the collision caused the vehicle to break in two. Harris County Sheriff’s Office Vehicular Crimes Unit has charged Jaggar Clayton Smith, 17-year-old, with two counts of intoxication manslaughter. HCSO Traffic Investigators Charge 17 Year Old with Two Counts of Intoxication Manslaughter — full release: https://t.co/CE6stAOtRh#HouNews pic.twitter.com/682xvXkGmA— HCSOTexas (@HCSOTexas) July 25, 2018Authorities said on approximately 12:05 a.m. July 25, 2018, Smith was operating his Nissan Altima in the 18300 block of Timber Forest with two 16-year-old girls, Salma Gomez and Chloe Robison. Smith failed to drive in a single lane and left the roadway traveling southeast into the center median of the roadway rotating counter-clockwise. The right side of the Smith’s vehicle struck a tree and the force of the collision caused the vehicle to break in two. The defendant was transported to Houston Northwest Medical Center where he was treated for his injuries and arrested on two counts of Intoxication Manslaughter.Teens involved in this accident were close friends and students at @HumbleISD Atascocita High School. #hounews— Ed Gonzalez (@SheriffEd_HCSO) July 25, 2018last_img read more