Michael Bailey named Ohio Farm Bureau vice president

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest  1 CommentMichael Bailey of Marysville has been named vice president, strategic partnerships for Ohio Farm Bureau. In this newly created position, he will develop and manage key relationships and partnerships within the farm and food sector and with businesses, educators, public officials and others. He also will be responsible for the Ohio Farm Bureau Foundation; OFBF Development Corporation; member benefits and services; Young Agricultural Professionals, youth and leadership development programs and Farm Bureau events.  Bailey has extensive experience in building productive relationships, creating partnerships and attaining shared goals and applied those skills in numerous senior administrative positions within state government.  At the Ohio Department of Agriculture, he served as deputy director, executive director of the Livestock Care Standards Board, senior program manager for the marketing division and executive director for the Office of Farmland Preservation. At the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, he was chief of the Division of Soil and Water Resources and most recently chief of the Division of Parks and Watercraft.  Bailey is also a major in the United States Army Reserve and is concluding a period of active duty service at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. A combat veteran of Operation Enduring Freedom while serving in Afghanistan, he is currently a military intelligence officer with over 17 years of service.   He grew up working on his family’s dairy and grain farm in Union County, which he now owns and farms with his father. Bailey is also a member of the Union County Farm Bureau. He and his wife, Jess, are raising their four children on their third-generation farm, and they worship at Marysville Grace Church. A graduate of The Ohio State University, Bailey received his bachelor’s degree in agribusiness and applied economics and a master’s degree in agricultural, environmental and developmental economics.  His addition to the OFBF senior leadership team is part of Executive Vice President Adam Sharp’s actions to realign staff teams and departments around key strategic plan areas of advocacy, membership, communication, financial strength, strategic partnerships and organizational excellence. The process began shortly after Sharp was named OFBF executive vice president in 2016. Ohio Farm Bureau’s mission is working together for Ohio farmers to advance agriculture and strengthen our communities.  This is a news release for use by journalists. Questions should be directed to Joe Cornely, 614-246-8230.Editors: A high resolution photo of Mr. Bailey is available to accompany this story.   1 Commentlast_img read more

Don’t want to do anything fancy: Kidambi Srikanth aims for consistency

first_imgNewly-crowned Denmark Open champion Kidambi Srikanth says he would be cutting down on the number of tournaments he competes in to be in best shape for the marquee events lined up next year.”I really want to play a fixed number of tournaments and don’t want to play all the tournaments and push myself for the ranking,” said Srikanth, who outclassed 37-year-old Lee Hyun II in a lop-sided final to clinch the Denmark Open title on Sunday.”I will play around 10 tournaments and then play the Commonwealth and the Asian Games, the World Championship and then there is Syed Modi which is compulsory and PBL, so it would make it 15-17 tournaments anyway,” he said.Srikanth capped an impressive week with a 21-10, 21-5 win over Lee in the final.#IndonesiaSS #AustraliaSS #DenmarkSSPSrikanth Kidambi will lift the ??? in Denmark. Beats Lee Hyun 21-10, 21-5.Take a bow, champ! ?? pic.twitter.com/7z2krGoxQl- PBL India (@PBLIndiaLive) October 22, 2017″I am happy with the way it went for me, it was fantastic. I beat some tough players this week. I can’t even say it was a dream come true because I never dreamt of winning three titles this year. I really want to continue playing well,” Srikanth said.”I just wanted to continue what I did this week and not do anything fancy. I feel I have to be more consistent in the coming months,” said Srikanth, who has clinched the Indonesia Super Series Premier and Australia Super Series this year.advertisementSrikanth, who won the 2014 China Open Super Series Premier and 2015 India Open Super Series, said he would look to finish the year on a high.With 3 trophies under his belt, Srikanth Kidambi has the most number of Superseries titles in the men’s singles circuit in 2017. ??? pic.twitter.com/xPpBaprArr- PBL India (@PBLIndiaLive) October 23, 2017″It was a good year for me. After coming back from injury, I played really well. There are more Super Series tournaments to go and I really want to finish well.”Asked about the Dubai Super Series Final in December, Srikanth said, “It is an important event. After China and Hong Kong, I will think about Dubai Super Series Final.”I reached semis in 2014 and in 2015, I lost in the league stages but it doesn’t matter. We, as players, have to forget what had happened and start afresh. So I don’t want to think about what happened in 2015,” he added.The 25-year-old from Guntur also revealed that he will be announcing a few deals in the coming months.”My management company IS in talks with some major firms and may be after these two tournaments, I will announce some sponsorship deals,” he said.last_img read more

At Oklahoma State, Money Really Does Buy Greatness

first_imgThere was a great longer article in the Tulsa World at the end of last week about Mike Holder’s first 10 years on the job. That culminated on Wednesday which was his 10th anniversary.Did you know that only two men have been there longer as the AD?Ed Gallagher (1915-31) and Henry P. Iba (1935-69). “Pretty fast company right there,” Holder says. “I like that.”What I found to be interesting is how much money OSU has raised (and lost!), mostly during Holder’s tenure. Here is Holder’s estimate.From 1970 through 1999, Holder says, OSU spent a total of $10 million on athletic facilities. In 2000-10, he reports, OSU spent $400 million on facilities. Now not all of that was for football, but we all know the king of American sports is what drives economics at an athletic department. Because of that, I wanted to look at the correlation between money spent and winning percentage. How much is each win worth if we presume that all that money was spent on football (and it wasn’t).[1. We’re also not taking into account inflation etc. This is not an economics blog.]Here’s a look. You want to be on the bottom right of this graph where you don’t have to spend a ton of money but you still win a ton of games. OSU has been on the bottom left (good for the pocketbook!) and the upper right (good for morale!)Screen Shot 2015-09-17 at 11.23.56 AMThe answer to the latter is easy. OSU won 171.5 games between 1970 and 1999 (for the college kids, there used to be ties … crazy, I know). At $10 million spent on facilities, that’s $58,000 a W. OSU has won 117 games since 2000. That’s $3.4 million. Success is pricey.“We’ve won in every sport here, except in football,” Holder told the Tulsa World. “We wanted to try to do something to change that, so when you went to the football stadium on Saturday, you actually had a chance to win the football game. I wanted to see what that was like.”It feels pretty good, doesn’t it?If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more

Inquiry legal battles loom over info police want kept secret

first_imgAPTN National NewsFor the moment, the families of Robert Pickton’s victims have wrapped up their testimony at the missing women’s inquiry in Vancouver.The sister of one victim used her chance on the stand to tell police exactly how she felt about their botched investigation.Her emotional testimony comes just as family lawyers fear a fierce legal battle is looming over efforts by police to keep some material secret.APTN National News reporter Rob Smith has this story.last_img