10 Lakeside Mountain Biking Loops Not to Miss This Summer

first_imgWe could list all the reasons we love mountain biking—the challenge of a long uphill, those heart-pounding downhill lines, the satisfaction of solving a technical section—but one reason rises above the others: the views. The views, the air, the outdoors. Surrounded by trees, riding a trail through ferns and boulders and briars to emerge on some ridgeline, some riverbank, some lakeshore. That moment is the payoff to a day of pedaling, so we found 10 lakeside trails that are worth every ounce of effort.Issaqueena ForestClemson Experimental Forest, Clemson, SCClemson University’s 17,500-acre experimental forest is laced with more than 100 miles of mountain biking trails and forest roads spread over three distinct areas. Make your way to Issaqueena Forest where 47 miles of trails await. You’ll find waterfalls just of the trail but biking the Issaqueena Lake Trail along the east side of the lake will reward you with some stunning views. Before you go, know this is a teaching forest and trails are built to study recreational design and use, so conditions vary, routes vary, and finding your way can be tough (bring a GPS).Paris Mountain State ParkGreenville, SCJust six miles north of Greenville, SC, (a cool town where it’s easy to quench your thirst and fill your belly) you’ll find Paris Mountain State Park and some of the top mountain biking trails in the Upcountry. Eleven miles of Intermediate-to-Difficult trails give you a taste of everything: switchbacks, technical climbs and downhills, steep sections, and ramps. Ride Brissy Ridge to Pipsissewa to North Lake for a 5-mile ride that will loop the lake. The only downside: since these are hiking-biking trails, it’s boots only on Saturday. The upside: you can ride Greenville’s popular Swamp Rabbit Trail on Saturday and never be far from a cold brew.rsz_1allegrippis_raystown_credit_aelandesBig Bear Lake Trail CenterBruceton Mills, WVThe reputation of Big Bear Lake Trail Center has been growing because within their 50 miles of trail you can put together a ride that introduces novice riders to the sport or challenges the most experienced rider in your group. In addition to the iconic singletrack cutting through thigh-high ferns, rock gardens, and brake-testing downhills, a couple of tracks skirt the edges of the namesake lake. If you’re into races and endurance events, keep these guys on your radar as they hold several throughout the year.Fort Yargo- biking-GeorgiaDepartmentofNaturalResourcesMountwood ParkWaverly, WVClose to 30-miles of singletrack trails cut courses through the valleys, ridges, and ravines that make up Mountwood Park. Lake Trail and Rat Snake Trail will have you pedaling alongside the 50-acre lake, while other rides—Trip to The Moon, Warrior Ridge, and Power Line—will challenge you with leg-burning uphills and switchbacks. Mark your calendars for their early-April Challenge at Mountwood but go ahead and start riding, consider it training for next year.Allegrippis TrailsHuntingdon, Pa.It’s no surprise that the Allegrippis Trails—ranked among the top mountain biking trails in the world by SingleTrack.com—appear on this list. The two-dozen trails in the system give riders 30 miles of trail to ride and combine any way they please. Raystowne Deer Trail gets you lakeside, but just about every trail has lake views. One thing that makes these trails excellent is access. Beginners will find the trails doable and challenging if they take them slow, and experts will find the trails ripe for lung-ripping rides. If you’re hitting the trail here and want a little warm up, check out the 2-acre Raystowne Mountain Bike Skills Park and stretch out or brush up on some neglected techniques.rsz_allegrippis_raystownlake_evanwheelie_credit_aelandesphotographyFort Yargo State ParkWinder, Ga.What can be better than a swim at the end of a long ride? Pedal the length of either the Yellow or Blue Trail at Fort Yargo State Park and you’ll earn that dip in the lake. Both trails carry you to the water’s edge and bring you uphill for even bigger views. Though each trail is rated as intermediate, Yellow is considerably easier and both the length of Blue (12 miles) and the section known as the “Monster Mile” will push the endurance of advanced riders.Tsali Recreation AreaBryson City, NCTsali is well known and technically the trails there only flank the edge of Fontana Lake (but we can forgive that, right? I mean, Fontana’s only got 240 miles of shoreline, so a loop would be a little time-consuming), but still, they offer a solid mix of challenging rides and pause-worthy views. Mouse Branch, Left Loop, and Thompson Loop Trails provide loads of waterside riding, while Right Loop gets you up on the ridge for long views of the lake and mountains. Access to these trails alternate between equestrian and mountain bikes, so two days here will cover all four trails.Issaqueena-creditTKTKKerr Scott TrailsWilkesboro, NCBuilt by mountain bikers for mountain bikers, the trails at Kerr Scott Reservoir in the North Carolina mountains are possibly the most challenging on the list. Three sets of trails—Dark Mountain, Overmountain Victory Trail, and Warrior Creek—offer up lake views along with their own quirks, pulse-quickening moments, and problems to solve. Warrior Creek follows the undulating shoreline of the reservoir and challenges riders with technical downhill and uphill sections. All of these trails are tough and Warrior Creek is by far the toughest, so come prepared for a big day.FountainheadTrail-flickr-scorchedearthPanther Creek State ParkMorristown, Tenn.Mountain Bikers will find 15 miles of trails along the shore of Cherokee Lake and along the lakeside hills in Tennessee’s Panther Creek State Park to be lovely and immensely rideable. That said, they are suited to Beginner-to-Intermediate riders, but experienced riders shouldn’t be discouraged by this, they should see it as an opportunity to bring a new rider along and show them why your love for mountain biking falls somewhere between passion and obsession.Panther Creek State Park_flickr_Simon (1)Fountainhead Regional ParkFairfax, Va.We’d be remiss if we didn’t’ mention Carvin’s Cove, the fantastic recreation area near Roanoke, Va., but since we know we’ll find so many readers on the trail there anyway, we thought we’d look elsewhere in Virginia for a killer lakeside Ride. Enter Fountainhead Regional Park in Fairfax. The trails here are bike-only; are riddled with rock gardens, wooden ramps and banked turns; have clearly marked alternate routes to guide beginners around technical or difficult features; and the loops here can be ridden in any order, giving experienced riders a challenging day in the saddle. At several points you’ll want to stop for a breather and to take in those views of the Occoquan Reservoir.Related Content:last_img read more

Arthur Johnson, 87, Oxford: Feb. 4, 1929 – June 25, 2016

first_imgArthur JohnsonArthur M. Johnson, 87, of Oxford died Saturday, June 25, 2016 at the Kansas Veterans Home in Winfield.Funeral Services will be held at 10 a.m., Wednesday, June 29, 2016 at the Oxford Christian Church. Visitation will be held on June 28, 2016 from 12 until 8 p.m., with the family receiving friends from 5 to 7 p.m. at Oxford Funeral Service Chapel. Memorials have been established with the Kansas Veterans Home and Oxford Church of Christ and may be left with Oxford Funeral Service. Burial will be at the Oxford Cemetery. Arrangements are with Oxford Funeral Service. For further information please visit www.oxfordfuneralservice.com.Arthur Milton Johnson was born on February 4, 1929, the son of John and Ruth (Putnam) Johnson in Spencer, NE. He was known to his family and friends as Art or Johnny. He graduated from Spencer Nebraska High School in 1946 and joined the U.S. Air Force in 1948 and was a training mechanics instructor. Following service he worked briefly for O’Neill Outlaw Grocery and then for H.C. Leach Oil Field Construction. He worked on in-flight refueling and rebuilding helicopters during the Vietnam War.Art was also a defense contractor administrator as the regional manager of DCA’s quality assurance completing 33 years of civil service. On March 3, 1951 Art was united in marriage to Margaret Leach. They lived in Electra, TX, O’Neill, NE, Holliday, TX, and Amarillo before moving to Oxford, KS in 1973. Art was a member of the Oxford Church of Christ.Art is survived by his three children: Larry Johnson and his wife Linda of Winfield, Gary Johnson and his wife Susan of Oxford, and Susan Spoon and her husband Robert of Oxford; grandchildren: Jonathan Johnson and his wife Abby of  Dexter, Daniel Spoon and his wife Stephanie of Oxford, Kaly Spoon of Oxford, Seth Johnson of Derby, Aaron Johnson and his wife Eden of Clearwater, Kaydee Johnson and Laura Riggs of Winfield, and Zac Johnson of Oxford, Jessica Lucas of Lawrence, Nick Lucas of Wellington, and Mary Lucas of Winfield; great grandchildren: Keaton and Charlee Johnson, Grayson Drake, Kase and Kale Johnson, Reignor Abasolo, Mary Tyler, Corbin and Carson Lucas; two sisters: Helen and Duane Bolliger and Caroline Rossi and one brother, Leo Johnson.He is preceded in death by his parents, his loving wife, Margaret, two brothers: Carlton “Buck” Johnson and Kenny Johnson, and 3 sisters: Evelyn Liable, Nancy Gamble and Opal “Soapy” Miller.last_img read more

December 4 2015The November workshop crew got an

first_imgDecember 4, 2015The November workshop crew got an opportunity to leave their mark in concrete as they mixed, carried and filled in the formwork for the amphitheater stage. [all photos and text by Hildemar Cruz]Crew members worked early in the morning while the weather behaved to mix and carry all the materials to pour the new layer on the stage. Patience and commitment proved to be the best tools for this task, as workshop participant Carlos works diligently to fill in the formwork.Teamwork wins again! The group was able to completely fill in the edge of the stage before morning meeting.last_img read more