Wyandanch Armed Home Invasion Leaves Victim Hurt

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County police are investigating a home invasion in Wyandanch over the weekend during which the victim was wounded by two suspects armed with a knife and a screwdriver, authorities said.The armed duo came into the victim’s Levey Boulevard home, demanded money and hit the victim before rifling through his belongings at 11 a.m. Friday, police said.It is unclear what, if anything, the assailants stole before they fled the scene.The victim was taken to Good Samaritan Hospital in West Islip for treatment of his injuries.No suspects have been arrested and no description of the attackers was available, police said.First Squad detectives are continuing the investigation.last_img read more

Employment equity body named

first_img28 July 2005Labour Minister Membathisi Mdladlana has expressed confidence at the establishment of a second Commission for Employment Equity.He said that the appointment of the commission, to be chaired by Jimmy Manyi, would add impetus to the quest of achieving equality in the country’s workplaces.The commission’s members are Marlene Bossett and Lebogang Montjane from business, Tefo Raditapole and Neva Makgetla from organised labour, Mzolisi kaToni and Khulu Mbongo from the community sector, and Alfred Tau representing the state.Like the first commission – appointed in 1999 under the leadership of Mapule Ramashala – the second commission is mandated to advise the minister on codes of good practice, regulations, policy and other matters concerning the Employment Equity Act.Mdladlana said the establishment of the commission came at a time when compliance with the law was moving too slowly, with recent statistics indicating that blacks, African women and disabled people were still discriminated against in relation to appointments to influential positions.“The new commission will develop, adopt and implement strategies that vigorously respond to the very slow pace at which we are reaching the overall objectives of the Act,” Mdladlana said.He said his department was balancing enforcement of employment equity compliance with strengthening collaboration with social partners, as well as aligning employment equity with broad-based black economic empowerment, skills development and preferential procurement.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

The Children Struggle Too!

first_imgWe all play a pivotal role in helping support our military children through the process of deployment. While a soldier’s job may be to fight for and protect our freedom it should never be at the cost of the well-being of his or her child. Become aware of and validate difficult feelings (guilt, resentment, anxiety, confusion, anger, or fear)Become more sensitive to their family structure and living arrangements (some children stay with grandparents- not parents)Acknowledge that children may sense of a loss of time with the deployed parentHelp children maintain a close distance relationship with the deployed parent (allow the child to make things for care packages, record voice notes, create cards and other small gifts online, play online games with the deployed parent, leave the deployed parent Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) messages, etc.)Encourage children to journal or write down feelings they are experiencingAbove all, listen to children. Sometimes children just need to talk without being pressured or judged by others. As every military family knows, deployment is a necessary part of the job. The enlisted service member has a responsibility to the branch of service to which they belong and their responsibilities are taken very seriously. But the family they leave behind is equally important.As a military families support professional, you recognize deployment as one of the most difficult times for families. And while there’s lots of information on how deployment affects the servicemembers and their spouses, what about the impact on their children left at home with one “solo parent” and one who is deployed?The Center for Military Health Policy Research did a recent study in an attempt to explore how deployment affects the academic, social, and emotional well-being of military children. The study looked at 1,500 children aged 11-17. All the children in the study had at least one parent in the military in that 57% had an Army parent, 20% had an Air Force parent, 17% had a Navy parent and the remainder of the parents were in the Coast Guard or Marine Corps.The results showed that children with a deployed parent reported:Increased levels of anxietyEmotional and behavioral difficultiesIncreased problem behaviors, (i.e., fighting)Greater difficulties in social and emotional functioningGreater school or peer-related difficultiesSo what can we do to support these children through one of the most difficult times of their lives? As support professionals we can help the adults in the child’s life to:center_img Have some ideas of your own on how to support children with a deployed parent? Please share them in the comments section below. We would love to hear what works for the families you serve. 🙂last_img read more