No rout, but Trojans will take win

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe top 10 theme park moments of 2019 With USC posting gaudy stats, like 724 yards of offense, 39 first downs and 37 minutes in time of possession, it’s hard to imagine the Trojans only held a 28-21 lead with 13 minutes remaining. That contradiction between score and stats forced Carroll to go out of his way to rationalize the Trojans’ performance. “Sometimes you’re going to play well and not win. Anyway. I don’t really care,” Carroll said. “I just like getting wins. I don’t know what more you can expect. “I’m a football coach. I’ve been coaching for 37 years and you don’t win every game everything-to-nothing. It just doesn’t happen like that. I wish it did, but it just doesn’t. You’ve got to live with the game and play it.” The tone underscored a feeling that maybe things didn’t go quite as smoothly as expected, despite that overwhelming difference in yardage, as Arizona gained just 245 yards. It’s too bad USC didn’t play defense as well on the field as in the locker room Saturday, or the No. 1-ranked Trojans would have experienced far fewer tense moments against Arizona. USC coach Pete Carroll considered this game a test for the Trojans to play to their ability, no matter the opponent. But the Trojans’ 42-21 victory over Arizona before 90,221 at the Coliseum didn’t prove much, except that a pair of fourth-quarter touchdowns could make the score more lopsided than it was for most of the game. “A win is a win,” quarterback Matt Leinart said, defending the outcome. “Maybe it doesn’t feel or look like it, but it’s a win.” center_img It’s also the result of increased expectations, built during USC’s 27-game winning streak. “I don’t think expectations are too high. They are what they are,” Carroll said. “It doesn’t bother me. I’m letting you know what I feel. This was a heckuva win, when you play a good defense and score 42 points.” Arizona is also a 2-3 team and winless (0-2) in the Pacific-10 Conference. That fact wasn’t lost on offensive lineman Winston Justice, who took himself to task for the closer-than-expected result. “It was just a bad game. It was all our fault too,” he said. “I think it was the whole offense. I had a bad game, personally.” Justice committed three holding penalties (two were enforced) after Arizona coaches alerted the officials to watch him closely during the game. “It was just one of those games,” Justice said. Maybe Justice didn’t get the memo on how good Arizona was. But neither did anyone else apparently. Although USC scored on its opening drive, it started out slowly for the third consecutive game. “We need to stop starting off slow,” said Justice, a Poly High graduate. “It’s going to hurt us when we play a better team.” USC (5-0, 3-0) was lucky to lead 14-7 at halftime, as Leinart threw an interception and tailback Desmond Reed, playing because Reggie Bush sprained his knee and missed part of the first half, fumbled. There was also an embarrassing effort from the kickoff team, which allowed returns of 51 and 76 yards to Arizona’s Syndric Steptoe. And the defense also got in the act, as cornerback John Walker allowed a 38-yard pass that set up Arizona’s first touchdown and cornerback Justin Wyatt gave up a 42-yard touchdown pass that cut the Trojans lead to 21-14. “We don’t give up fade routes,” secondary coach Greg Burns said. “We’ve got to clean that up. Our defense doesn’t do that.” It all set the stage for an interesting fourth quarter. With USC ahead 28-21, Leinart threw a 29-yard touchdown pass to Dwayne Jarrett. Or did he? Replays indicated Jarrett juggled the ball but were inconclusive and the officials never reviewed the play. “I was in,” Jarrett said. “I knew I bobbled it but I held it up. At the last second, I tried to drag my feet. The ref was right there. We’d have scored anyways.” Just in case, Carroll called out, “May Day,” USC’s code for getting the field-goal team out quickly, to prevent a review by the officials. Arizona actually responded and drove to the USC 6-yard line, but quarterback Richard Kovalcheck’s pass got tipped by linebacker Collin Ashton and intercepted by safety Ryan Ting. “The ball felt like it was in the air forever,” Ting said. For perhaps the third consecutive game, USC tailback LenDale White demonstrated he’s as valuable as Bush or Leinart, with 179 yards and four touchdowns in 24 carries. “I want the ball in my hands every play,” White said. USC NOTES: White has gained 376 yards in the past two weeks, the most by a Trojan tailback over two games since Marcus Allen gained 398 in consecutive starts in 1981. White has done it in far fewer carries (43 vs. 90). … Arizona coach Mike Stoops thought Jarrett bobbled the fourth-quarter TD reception. “I saw a bobble,” Stoops said. “I don’t know why they didn’t review it. I didn’t see his feet.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

State corn grower leaders to Trump: Uphold commitment to farmers and RFS

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest State leaders of corn grower organizations in 23 states sent a letter to President Trump, calling on him to follow the law and keep the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) whole. The letter to the President comes on the heels of the Trump Administration’s most recent approval of 31 new RFS waivers to big oil companies. The 85 total waivers approved under the Trump Administration amount to 4.04 billion gallons, resulting in reduced corn demand due to lower ethanol blending and consumption and a rising number of ethanol producers slowing or idling production.The state corn grower leaders urge the President to stop the harm caused by waivers and restore integrity to the RFS by directing the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to account for projected waivers beginning with the pending 2020 RFS volume rule.The full text of the letter is below.Dear President Trump,We are writing on behalf of the more than 300,000 corn farmers across the country who are being negatively impacted by a perfect storm of challenges in rural America. The 31 new Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) waivers to big oil companies, recently approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and bringing total waivers issued under your Administration to 85, could not have come at a worse time for agriculture.Ethanol plants in several states, including Iowa, Ohio, Wisconsin, Michigan, Indiana, Minnesota and Mississippi have closed or idled. These closures have cost 2,700 rural jobs and impacted demand for more than 300 million bushels of corn. Corn farmers are beginning harvest and continuing to lose markets to deliver their corn. Frustration in the countryside is growing.Corn farmers are not asking for a special deal. We are simply asking, as we have been for the past two years, that your EPA uphold the law.To effectively stop the harm caused by RFS waivers, EPA needs to account for projected waivers beginning with the pending 2020 RFS volume rule. Accounting for waivers in the annual RFS volume process restores integrity to the RFS. It also allows your Administration to continue granting waivers, as allowed by the law, while keeping the RFS whole.While adding gallons and improving market access for higher blends of ethanol are all policies farmers appreciate and support, future waivers will continue to minimize the RFS, unless your Administration acts to account for waivers beginning this coming year first.We were pleased to see press reports indicating that, following a meeting with farm-state lawmakers, an agreement had been reached to address the harm caused by waivers. With more than 4 billion gallons waived out of the RFS, we appreciate you listening to our elected representatives about what is needed to restore meaning to the RFS. Farmers across the country are anxiously awaiting the release of more details about this agreement. Ethanol plants will continue to close if you don’t act soon, creating a rippling effect throughout the rural economy.Corn farmers are appreciative of your past support for agriculture and ethanol. We especially appreciate your efforts to remove the barrier to year-round sales of E15, but EPA’s current use of waivers undermines growth potential for higher blends of ethanol, reduces demand, lowers the value of our crop, and puts the outlook for the rural economy in jeopardy.Mr. President, we firmly ask that you uphold your commitment to America’s farmers and the RFS.last_img read more

Stuff I Learned at Joe Lstiburek’s House, Part 1

first_imgThe invitation was too cool to be real: My name was somehow on a list of “experts” who were invited to take part in a Building America Water Heater Expert Session on combo systems. The invite noted that the session was to be the day before Joe Lstiburek’s Building Science Summer Camp, and “it is expected that the information obtained will lend itself toward the eventual production of a guide for the best practice application of combination space and domestic water heating systems for new and retrofit residential construction.”I noticed a heavy representation of tankless water heater manufacturers, as well as researchers and giants of the industry Gary Klein and Larry Weingarten. Martin Holladay was invited as designated skeptic and naysayer, a role he served vigorously.Needless to say, I got there an hour earlyTo get us started, Hugh Magande from Rinnai ran us through the ignition sequence of the Rinnai condensing and modulating domestic water heater and discussed improvements they have made to shorten it, especially on re-starts after a brief off cycle, to reduce the “cold water sandwich” problem.Originally the systems required a ten-second cold fan run to clear any residual propane from the combustion chamber and “prove draft” before starting the ignition sequence. Rinnai has reduced this time; the new range is from 10 seconds to as low as 2 seconds to cold start and shorter for re-start after short off periods (short bursts of hot water in close sequence). Stuff I Learned at Joe Lstiburek’s House, Part 2Using a Tankless Water Heater for Space HeatStorage vs. Tankless Water Heaters RELATED ARTICLES center_img Rinnai has responded to the new ultra-low-flow faucets by dropping the low-flow limit from .7 to .4 gpm for cold start and .2 gpm for re-start, but with less than .3 triggering the shutdown. Once first burn is proved, the two central gas valves ignite and, if water doesn’t come up to temperature, two more light, then two more. Water is heated to as high as 180°F and then mixed down to the set-point by a computerized mixing valve.Setting the water temperature too cold can cause low-flame issues, so a 140°F set-point leads to the cleanest burn. Cooler intake water is directly related to better energy efficiency. At 100°F the water heater has an efficiency of 91%; at 110°F that drops to 89%, at 120°F only 88%, and at 130°F intake water it drops it to 86%.Of course, a few years ago we considered 86% efficiency to be pretty darn good, but these days we’re seeking durability and low first cost at 90% efficiency — plus the capacity to provide both domestic hot water and space heating.What could possibly go wrong with tankless water heaters?Martin Thomas from NRC (Natural Resources Canada) shared photos of tankless water heaters hooked up to small electric water heaters used as tempering tanks which provide hot water to fan-coil units for forced-air heating systems.Thomas discussed the problems encountered in these systems: reduced tankless water heater efficiency and perpetually clogged intake filters. Running the tempering loop off the tank bottom at 110°F gives limited opportunity for condensation, but as soon as the water leaving the bottom of the tank exceeds 120°F, you no longer have a condensing water heater. Worse, the warmer water makes the modulating water heater turn down to its lowest setting which, like running a car at 15 miles an hour, further reduces the efficiency of the unit.People in the audience spoke of measuring the efficiency of on-demand water heaters at about 50% when choked down in this fashion. I have certainly witnessed this problem, as well as soot build-up on heat exchangers when burning propane this way. So if you’re running a tankless water heater to maintain heat on a tempering tank for use in a radiant floor, you won’t get any benefit from using a modulating unit and very little from using a condensing unit.Non-modulating units are cheaperThe folks from Bosch were very quick to note that their units are non-modulating (and most of them are non-condensing and sell in big box stores for around $600). Here I was installing the best Rinnai and Quietside units and I would have been better off with the inexpensive Bosch from Home Depot, which would probably have allowed me to size the recirculation pump down to a Taco 006 (instead of the more expensive Taco 009s we’ve been using).Dave Hammond from A.O. Smith spoke about using a fast-acting probe-type thermistor rather than the surface-mounted aquastat typically found on the electric tank water heaters to activate and shut down the recharge pump more quickly, improving system efficiency by reducing recharge time.A casual side comment made me go “Ah ha!” — when someone spoke of wrapping thermistors in electrical tape to “prevent those problems you get when you have metal-to-metal contact with thermistors.” I’ve sure seen the problem, but never realized the solution was so simple.Rolling the tank stings two waysThe clogged intake filter problem seems to be related to debris coming from the anode rod. The problem is exacerbated by tank turbulence (AKA “rolling the tank” — when incoming water creates a current that sends hot water to the bottom of the tank and pushes cold water and sediment to the top). So using a smaller pump with a shorter run-time could reduce tank turbulence and help solve this problem.I spoke about returning the water to the tempering tank using a horizontally mounted perforated “solar” dip tube to diffuse the flow and layer the hottest water into the top of the tank, to press the coldest water from the bottom of the tank to the tankless water heater.The folks from Bosch proposed that plumbers just remove the filter after two months of operation, as their equipment only needs the filter in long enough to keep any teflon tape and pipe dope from jamming the flow. However, the Rinnai and Navien reps at the meeting didn’t jump on that bandwagon.It’s Larry Weingarten’s turnLarry Weingarten from Water Heater Rescue spoke of using a J-shaped cold-water dip tube to push debris up against the drain port, facilitating tank cleaning during maintenance.Combined heat and hot water systems increase tank cycling and accelerate aging, so tank durability is an important part of this discussion. Weingarten stimulated a glorious conversation with graphic photos of tank failures and premature anode-rod decay. He proposed the idea of buying souped-up electrically powered anode rods and avoiding soft aluminum anode rods, and he explained how to tell the difference between magnesium and aluminum anode rods by looking for a bump on the nut (bump good, flatness bad).Larry also sold me on using plastic-lined steel nipples to minimize corrosion in the transition between glass-lined steel tanks and brass or copper fittings. He also made a convincing argument to replace the plastic drain port at the bottom of the tank with a proper 3/4-inch ball valve and to take the time every year to flush the corrosive sediment.The low flow rates of modern WaterSense-listed fixtures has created problems with tankless water heaters that tempering tanks can help address. Larry led a discussion on faucet aerator designs, citing Brycor and Neoperl. You can open up your design choices in faucet selection and just swap out the aerators — the low-flow ones are even helpfully made from green plastic, so the green building rater can verify the swap. We also discussed the pressure drop of different tankless water heaters, noting that the same flow from a Taco 009 pump on a Rinnai would require a Taco 013 in a Navien.A vote for simplificationMartin Holladay pointed out (vigorously) that we were all going around our elbows to get to our thumbs, by designing and fine-tuning these complex systems when we should just give up and admit that we need one appliance to heat domestic hot water and another to heat the home. (My lead plumber, Matt McDonald, points this out to me on a regular basis, much to my annoyance.) He also noted that most of the suggested modifications to tankless water heaters used for space heating — adding a storage tank, a huge intake filter, and a circulating pump, for example — complicated the systems in the effort to restore the advantages of a cheaper tank-style heater.Martin loves wood stoves, solar water heaters, and wall-hung minisplit heat pumps, but he has a point. From my perspective, I just can’t imagine building a passive solar house without a well insulated slab floor, and I can’t imagine skipping the opportunity to put radiant piping in a slab and heating it with a water heater, especially with a solar tie-in.Someone in the audience pointed out that A.O. Smith makes the Vertex condensing tank-type water heater that doesn’t cost much more than a good condensing tankless water heater, and solves many of the problems of marrying a tankless to a tempering tank. The Vertex still hits condensing efficiencies when supplying heat and hot water (or in a radiant floor application). Up to now, condensing tank-type water heaters like Triangle Tube, Polaris, and Phoenix have been much more expensive than condensing tankless water heaters, but it appears that the Vertex at least is competitive with all but the Bosch, which appears to be what we should have been using all along.Problematical standards, againThe discussion then degraded to raging against the test standards by which these devices are rated. Most excoriated was the ASHRAE 124-2007, “Combined Heat and Hot Water Annual Efficiency Test Standard,” which prescribes supply and return temperatures which may not be the temperatures your equipment is designed for, and further requires that all “smart controls” be disabled prior to testing the equipment. The test gives no way to assess the real-world performance of a system with advanced electronic optimization.Slightly less vitriol was directed at the Canadian CSA P.9-2011 standard, and mention was made of a new ASHRAE 206 standard for heat-pump water heaters.I inserted my foot in my mouth by kvetching about how our local HVAC contractors have taken radiant heating away from the plumbers here in North Carolina through activism with their licensing board. My comment fired up the HVAC contractors in the back of the room, who took exception to my complaint. I countered that profiteering by the HVAC industry is slowing the acceptance of minisplit wall-hung heat pumps, because folks who sell ducted heat seek higher markups from systems that are ductless.We agreed to revisit it at the club house, and eventually all ended well. Last year I ticked off the spray foam industry by bringing up the halogenated flame retardant issue; this year I ticked off the HVAC guys. Joe says I’m not off the list so far, so I’ll see who I aggravate next year.The elephant in the roomWe are all expecting the manufacturers who are putting out these tank-top heat pump water heaters to come out with minisplit versions, where the compressor is located outdoors and doesn’t heat your water by cooling the air that has just been heated by your furnace, but instead harvests heat from outside the house. I assume that they are still working out the issues of stripping the heat off the coil efficiently, and I hope that they will get these products on the market soon.At this point the Daikin Altherma, Multi Aqua, Space Pak, Unichiller RC, and Aqua Products reverse-cycle chillers are too multi-purpose and expensive to economically serve the simple need to heat a tank of water with a recharge rate of 60 to 140 kBTUh (the typical range for combined heat and hot water systems). Most of these are designed to provide both modulating heat and cooling to fan-coils in forced-air applications.We need to see a convergence of these technologies, and I think a lot of that innovation will come from the folks at the annual Westford Summer Camp.last_img read more

Two criminals shot dead in U.P. encounter

first_imgTwo notorious criminals were killed in an encounter with police in New Mandi area here on Tuesday, an official said.They were involved in several cases of loot and murder. Rohit alias Sandu and Rakesh were carrying cash rewards of ₹one lakh and ₹50,000 on their heads, respectively, ADG Prashant Kumar said. During the encounter, two policemen also sustained injuries, he said. Police have seized two pistols, cartridges and a motorcycle, Mr. Kumar added.last_img

Barack Obama likely to announce drawdown of troops in Afghanistan on Wednesday

first_imgUS President Barack Obama.US President Barack Obama was likely to announce the drawdown of American troops from Afghanistan on Wednesday, senior administration officials said.However, the White House insisted that Obama has made no decision so far, but said the decision on it would be made “very soon”.”The president is still in the process of finalising his decision on the pace and scope of the drawdown that will begin in July of 2011,” White House Press Secretary Jay Carney told reporters.”He (Obama) is finalising his decision. He’s reviewing the options and the assessments and will have an announcement to make soon,” he said in response to a question.Diplomats from various countries in the knowhow of information being shared by the Obama Administration, said the withdrawal was likely to be equivalent to the 30,000 surge announced by Obama in December 2009. Currently there are about 100,000 US troops serving in Afghanistan.Obamas top commander for Afghanistan, General David Patraeus, is in Washington this week, giving rise to the speculation that the announcement is imminent. The Pentagon too refused to entertain questions related to the announcement.”He (Obama) has had a number of consultations with his national security team, all members from, obviously, his uniform command, his civilian leadership, rather, all the principals on the national security team. He is continuing those consultations and will have an announcement soon,” Carney said.He said there has been significant progress in disrupting or halting the momentum of the Taliban and in stabilising Afghanistan and the government to allow Afghan national security forces to build up, to train and prepare for taking over the lead.advertisement”We have made significant progress towards achieving those goals. Obviously, the most sensational and significant data point in that progress, of that progress, is the elimination of Osama bin Laden. But, there has been enormous progress in disrupting and dismantling al-Qaeda in the Afghanistan-Pakistan region beyond and below Laden,” the official said.”So he looks at this decision as a part of a process, of a policy he put in motion in December of 2009. He said at the time that he would begin the drawdown of the surge forces in July of 2011. That will happen; the pace and scope of that will depend on his assessment of how far we have come in achieving the goals that he set out,” he added.- With PTI inputsFor more news on India, click here.For more news on Business, click here.For more news on Movies, click here.For more news on Sports, click here.last_img read more