MLAX : Syracuse looking to find identity in season’s 1st scrimmages

first_img Published on February 1, 2012 at 12:00 pm Contact Ryne: rjgery@syr.edu Comments When Syracuse takes the field in the Carrier Dome on Sunday, it will be searching for an identity. After losing seven starters and All-Americans from last season’s roster, the Orange enters the season as an unknown in college lacrosse for the first time in years.With the first scrimmage of the season this weekend, Tommy Palasek hopes to see the team begin establishing its identity.‘I think we’ve been doing a pretty good job figuring it out,’ Palasek said. ‘But as far as everyone else is concerned, I mean really no one’s seen us play since Maryland, so we have a whole new team for the most part. I think that we’re getting there.’Syracuse will be back in action for the first time since falling to Maryland in the NCAA tournament quarterfinals last May, taking on Le Moyne and Hofstra in a pair of scrimmages at the Carrier Dome on Sunday. The exhibition matchups will serve as a chance for the Orange to evaluate its progress two weeks before its season opener against Albany. With seven holes to fill going into the season, the tune-ups will also be a crucial to solidifying the starting lineup.Head coach John Desko said he is close to determining the starters and lineups on the field after nearly three weeks of practice.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textRight now, the head coach said goaltender Matt Lerman will start in net. On close defense — where the team must replace two starters — Desko listed four candidates to join veteran Brian Megill, who is currently battling injuries. And in the midfield, 10 different players are in the mix to see significant playing time. JoJo Marasco, Hakeem Lecky and Bobby Eilers appear to be set as the starters thus far.Though Desko has an idea of his plans heading into the season, there is still some uncertainty surrounding the final roster. And Sunday will allow him to mix and match players on different lines to see how different combinations respond in game situations.‘We see some different things happen in game situations and how different players react. Some rise to the occasion, some take a step back,’ Desko said. ‘And we see how well those have learned the offenses and defenses when they get in a game situation, so that tells us a lot in these types of scrimmages.’With 10 players fighting for time at midfield, Desko said he actually feels more comfortable with the line as a whole than he did heading into last season. Though they don’t have the same experience as last season’s group, which included three All-Americans, Desko said the intense competition has them clicking and learning the offense.The constant battling every day has started to form the identity the Orange is searching for.Bobby Eilers remembers a grueling team workout before leaving for Winter Break. At 6 a.m., every player did six-minute squat holds, grimacing in pain while pushing each other to finish the exercise that left their legs shaking.‘The whole team did it and everyone lasted six minutes, and that’s just what we’re kind of like this year,’ Eilers said. ‘We’re all just sticking together and doing things together, and it’s paying off. We’re meshing very well out there.’Eilers said he hopes that togetherness translates to success on the field for the Orange, specifically in the midfield.The defense — which ranked third in the nation in scoring defense and set a school record for man-down efficiency last season — has been Syracuse’s identity in recent years while the offense has struggled. But the senior wants to see the offense pick up its production this year and return to SU’s old ways when the Orange seemed to go on a scoring outburst every game.Palasek feels the Orange has the ability to achieve that. After a few weeks of practice, the attack characterizes Syracuse as an unselfish group that is always looking for the next pass and has the athleticism to get up and down the field.And though SU won’t know its identity until the regular season begins, Palasek is confident this group will continue the program’s success the same way it always has.‘We’re just trying to stick with the Syracuse way,’ Palasek said. ‘And that’s always been the Syracuse way and play unselfish, and we’re just trying to keep that identity.’rjgery@syr.educenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Microgrid Study To Determine Middletown’s Future Resiliency

first_imgBy Jay Cook |MIDDLETOWN – An effort to make the township more storm resilient while protecting many essential services is advancing.On Nov. 13 the governing body agreed to spend a $150,000 grant from the state Board of Public Utilities on a 12-month microgrid feasibility study. The goal is to explore the creation of a backup power source on a portion of Naval Weapons Station Earle’s waterfront base in Leonardo which would connect to more than a dozen municipal, county and federal services.“It’s a pretty big deal for us, when you think about what happened to Middletown after Sandy,” said Middletown Mayor Gerry Scharfenberger.A microgrid is defined by the BPU as “a group of interconnected loads and distributed energy resources (DER) within clearly defined electrical boundaries that acts as a single controllable entity with respect to the grid.” Microgrids have the ability to connect and disconnect from the electrical grid to enable it to operate in both grid-connected or island mode.The wish list of services being sought for connection to the microgrid are NWS Earle’s Waterfront Administration Area, Township of Middletown Sewage Authority, NY Waterways Ferry Terminal, Middletown Public Works and CNG Fueling Facilities, Middletown’s municipal complex, Leonardo Elementary School, Bayview Elementary School, Bayshore Middle School, Monmouth County Highway Department, Middletown Fire Stations 3, 4 and 7 and the Monmouth County Bayshore Outfall Authority, according to the BPU.Middletown was one of 13 entities in New Jersey awarded grant money in January by the BPU for the studies, which totaled over $2 million. Neptune Township was the only other Monmouth County town given a grant.Middletown officials are supporting the study, hoping it can provide significant backup to flood-prone areas along the Bayshore.Scharfenberger compared the township to a checkerboard with the microgrid protecting one or a few of the squares in a specific area.“I think we submitted a good proposal,” added township administrator Anthony Mercantante. “Because we were partnering with a federal agency, particularly the military, that made it attractive. We were also a town that was significantly impacted by the last two hurricanes, so clearly there’s a need for power resiliency along the coast.”Mercantante noted two specific areas in Middletown which could benefit the most: the Route 36 corridor and Port Monmouth. He said Route 36 is a key evacuation route out from the Bayshore which should have a backup.Also, Phase II of the $110 million Port Monmouth Flood Wall is under construction. “Reliable power to that during a storm is important,” Mercantante said, considering it would protect low-lying areas in the event of another major hurricane.Cooperation with NWS Earle was necessary for the study to go forward as preliminary plans have the microgrid positioned inside the base’s Leonardo post.Continuing to invest in storm resiliency is important for the United States Navy, said Dennis Blazak, NWS Earle’s community plans and liaison officer. He said NWS Earle suffered more than $50 million in damages and was out of power for a week after Super Storm Sandy.“It would mean that if we had another Hurricane Sandy, we’d still be able to operate and do our mission and work with our partners in the community,” Blazak said.William Addison, NWS Earle’s spokesman, said keeping military operations open is of utmost importance. He said NWS Earle is unique along the East Coast because of its ability to quickly supply ordnance to the Atlantic Fleet’s Carrier and Expeditionary Strike Groups.“Nobody can do it on the scale that we do it, and nobody can do it with the speed that we can,” Addison said. “That’s really where it comes into play for us.”Blazak also said microgrid consideration is laid out in the Joint Land Use Study, a federally funded project by the Department of Defense looking at how NWS Earle and its neighboring Monmouth County communities coexist.Mercantante said a microgrid would have no connection to the Monmouth County Reliability Project, a proposed 230-kV transmission line travelling from Aberdeen through Hazlet, Holmdel and Middletown before terminating in Red Bank. The Jersey Central Power & Light proposal currently sits before an Office of Administrative Law judge for a preliminary decision.Middletown awarded the $150,000 grant money to Leidos Engineering, a Massachusetts-based firm, and Scharfenberger anticipates a contract will be signed this week. Mercantante added a public hearing would ensue once the 12-month study is concluded. He also said it’s too early to tell what the cost of a microgrid would be if it’s found feasible, but said grant money and help from different agencies would be important.Addison echoed those statements, saying the study is a “joint effort.”“It can’t just be the Navy or the townships,” he said. “We certainly have to work together. We share that shoreline and we share that need.”This article was first published in the Nov. 16-23, 2017 print edition of the Two River Times.last_img read more